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Field Listing :: Military equipment inventories and acquisitions
This entry provides basic information on each country’s military equipment inventories, as well as how they acquire their equipment; it is intended to show broad trends in major military equipment holdings, such as tanks and other armored vehicles, air defense systems, artillery, naval ships, helicopters, and fixed-wing aircraft. Arms acquisition information is an overview of major arms suppliers over a specific period of time, including second-hand arms delivered as aid, with a focus on major weapons systems. It is based on the type and number of weapon systems ordered and delivered and the financial value of the deal. For some countries, general information on domestic defense industry capabilities is provided.
By Country Listing of the values for the Military equipment inventories and acquisitions field
Country Military equipment inventories and acquisitions
Afghanistan
the Afghan Army and Air Force inventory is mostly a mix of Soviet-era and more modern US equipment; since 2010, the US is the leading supplier of arms to Afghanistan, followed by Russia (2019 est.)
Albania
the Albanian military was previously equipped with mostly Soviet-era weapons that were sold or destroyed; its inventory now includes a mix of mostly donated and second-hand European and US equipment; since 2010, it has received equipment from France, Germany, Italy, and the US (2019 est.)
Algeria
the ANP's inventory includes mostly Russian-sourced equipment with smaller amounts from other suppliers, particularly China and Europe; since 2010, Russia is the leading supplier of armaments to Algeria, followed by China, Germany, and Italy (2020)
Angola
most Angolan Armed Forces weapons and equipment are of Russian, Soviet, or Warsaw Pact origin; Russia remains Angola's top supplier of military hardware, followed by Belarus, China, and Lithuania (2019 est.)
Antigua and Barbuda
the ABDF's equipment inventory is limited to small arms, light weapons, and soft-skin vehicles; the Coast Guard maintains ex-US patrol vessels and some smaller boats (2019 est.)
Argentina
the inventory of Argentina's armed forces is a mix of domestically-produced and mostly older imported weapons, largely from Europe and the US; since 2010, France and the US are the leading suppliers of equipment; Argentina has an indigenous defense industry that can produce air, land, and sea systems (2019 est.)
Armenia
the inventory of the Armenian Armed Forces (as well as the Nagorno-Karabakh Defense Army) includes mostly Russian and Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, almost all of Armenia's imported weapons have come from Russia (2019 )
Australia
the Australian military's inventory includes a mix of domestically-produced and imported Western (mostly US-origin, particularly aircraft) weapons systems; since 2015, the US is the largest supplier of arms, followed by Spain; the Australian defense industry produces a variety of land and sea weapons platforms; the defense industry also participates in joint development and production ventures with other Western countries, including the US and Canada (2019 est.)
Austria
the Austrian military's inventory includes a mix of domestically-produced and imported weapons systems from European countries and the US; since 2010, Germany and Italy are the leading suppliers of armaments to Austria; the Austrian defense industry produces a range of armored vehicles (2019 est.)
Azerbaijan
the inventory of the Azerbaijan military includes mostly Russian and Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, Russia is the leading supplier of arms to Azerbaijan, followed by Israel (2019 est.)
Bahamas, The
most of the RBDF's major equipment inventory is supplied by the Netherlands (2019 est.)
Bahrain
the inventory of the Bahrain Defense force is comprised mostly of equipment acquired from the US along with a smaller quantity of material from European suppliers; since 2010, Turkey and the US are the leading suppliers of arms to Bahrain (2019 est.)
Bangladesh
the Bangladesh Defense Force inventory is comprised of mostly Chinese and Russian equipment; since 2010, China and Russia are the chief suppliers of arms to Bangladesh (2019 est.)
Barbados
the RBDF's major equipment inventory - maritime patrol boats - is supplied by the Netherlands (2019 est.)
Belarus
the inventory of the Belarus Armed Forces is comprised of Russian-origin equipment; Belarus's defense industry manufactures some equipment, including vehicles, guided weapons, and electronic warfare systems (2019 est.)
Belgium
the Belgian Armed Forces have a mix of weapons systems from European countries, Israel, and the US; since 2010, France, Germany, and Switzerland are the leading suppliers of armaments; Belgium has an advanced, export-focused defense industry that focuses on components and subcontracting (2019 est.)
Belize
the BDF's inventory is limited and consists mostly of equipment from the UK and US (2019 est.)
Benin
the FAB is equipped with a mix of foreign-supplied weapons; historically, France and Russia (including the former Soviet Union) have been the chief suppliers of military hardware (2019 est.)
Bhutan
India has provided most of the Royal Bhutan Army's equipment, although the only recorded delivery of military equipment to Bhutan since 2010 was from France (2019 est.)
Bolivia
the Bolivian Armed Forces are equipped with a mix of mostly Brazilian, Chinese, European, and US equipment; since 2010, China and France are the leading suppliers of military hardware to Bolivia (2019 est.)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
the inventory for the Armed Forces of Bosnia and Herzegovina includes mainly Soviet-era weapons systems with a small mix of older European and US equipment (2019 est.)
Botswana
the BDF has a mix of foreign-supplied weapons and equipment, largely from European suppliers, as well as the US; since 2010, it has received limited quantities of equipment from Canada, France, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine, and the US (2019 est.)
Brazil
the Brazilian military's inventory consists of a mix of domestically-produced and imported weapons, largely from Europe and the US; since 2010, France, Germany, the UK, and the US are the leading suppliers of military equipment to Brazil; Brazil's defense industry is capable of designing and manufacturing equipment for all three military services; it also jointly produces equipment with other countries (2019 est.)
Brunei
the Royal Brunei Armed Forces imports nearly all of its military equipment and weapons systems; the top suppliers since 2010 are France, Germany, and the US (2019 est.)
Bulgaria
the Bulgarian Armed Forces inventory consists primarily of Soviet-era equipment, although in recent years, Bulgaria has attempted to procure more modern weapons systems from Western countries; since 2010, it has acquired limited quantities of military equipment from France, Israel, Italy, Norway, and the US (2019 est.)
Burkina Faso
the FABF has a mix of foreign-supplied weapons; since 2010, it has received limited amounts of equipment from several countries, including donated second hand armaments; the leading suppliers are Brazil, Russia, and Turkey (2019 est.)
Burma
the Burmese Defense Service's inventory is comprised mostly of older Chinese and Russian/Soviet-era equipment with a smaller mix of more modern acquisitions; since 2010, China and Russia are the leading suppliers of military hardware to Burma; other suppliers include Belarus, India, Israel, and South Korea (2019 est.)
Burundi
the FDN is armed mostly with weapons from Russia and the former Soviet Union, with some Western equipment, largely from France; since 2010, the FDN has received small amounts of mostly second-hand equipment from China, South Africa, and the US (2019 )
Cabo Verde
the FACV has a limited amount of mostly dated and second-hand equipment, largely from China, European countries, and the former Soviet Union; since 2010, it has received limited quantities of equipment (naval patrol craft and air craft) from the Netherlands and Portugal (2019 est.)
Cambodia
the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces are armed largely with older Chinese and Russian-origin equipment; it has received limited amounts of newer equipment since 2010 with China as the principal provider, followed by Ukraine (2019 est.)
Cameroon
the FAC inventory includes a mix of mostly older or second-hand Chinese, Russian, and Western equipment, with a limited quantity of more modern weapons; since 2010, the top suppliers to the FAC are China, Russia, Spain, and the US (2019 est.)
Canada
the CAF's inventory is a mix of domestically-produced equipment and imported weapons systems from Australia, Europe, Israel, and the US; since 2010, the leading supplier is the US; Canada's defense industry develops, maintains, and produces a range of equipment, including aircraft, combat vehicles, naval vessels, and associated components (2019 est.)
Central African Republic
the FACA is armed mostly with second-hand equipment donated by Russia; since 2010, it has received limited quantities of second-hand equipment from China and Ukraine as aid (2019 est.)
Chad
the ANT is mostly armed with older or second-hand equipment from Belgium, France, Russia, and the former Soviet Union; since 2010, the leading suppliers are China, Italy, and Ukraine; the US has also donated equipment (2019 est.)
Chile
the Chilean military inventory is comprised of a mix of mostly European and US equipment and a limited number of domestically-produced systems; since 2010, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the US are the leading suppliers; Chile's defense industry produces some military vehicles and naval craft (2019 est.)
China
the PLA is outfitted primarily with domestically-produced systems heavily influenced by technology derived from other countries; Russia is the top supplier of foreign military equipment since 2010, followed by France and Ukraine (2019 est.)
Colombia
the Colombian military inventory includes a wide mix of equipment from a variety of suppliers, including Brazil, Canada, Europe, Israel, South Korea, and the US; Germany, Israel, and the US are the leading suppliers of military hardware since 2010; Colombia's defense industry is active in producing air, land, and naval platforms (2019 est.)
Congo, Democratic Republic of the
the FARDC is equipped mostly with a mix of second-hand Russian and Soviet-era weapons acquired from Ukraine and other former Warsaw Pact nations, as well as some equipment provided by Brazil and France; most equipment was acquired between 1970 and 2000; since 2010, Ukraine is the largest supplier of arms to the FARDC (2019 est.)
Congo, Republic of the
the FAC is armed with mostly ageing Russian/former Soviet Union weapons, with some French and South African equipment; the leading suppliers of arms to the FAC since 2010 are Russia and South Africa (2019 est.)
Costa Rica
the Public Forces' inventory includes mostly second-hand US equipment; since 2000, the only reported major equipment deliveries were from the US (light helicopters in 2012 and 2014 and second-hand coast guard cutters in 2018) (2019 est.)
Cote d'Ivoire
the FACI is mostly equipped with second-hand weapons and equipment of Russian origin; the leading suppliers since 2000 are Belarus, Bulgaria, and Romania (2019 est.)
Croatia
the inventory of the Croatian Armed Forces consists mostly of Soviet-era equipment, although in recent years, it has attempted to acquire more modern weapon systems from Western suppliers; since 2010, the leading suppliers of military equipment to Croatia are Finland, Germany, and the US (2019 est.)
Cuba
the Cuban military inventory is comprised of Russian and Soviet-era equipment; the last recorded arms delivery to Cuba was by Russia in 2004 (2019 est.)
Cyprus
the inventory of the Cypriot National Guard is a mix of Soviet-era and some more modern weapons systems; since 2010, it has received equipment from France, Israel, Italy, Oman, and Russia (2019 est.)
Czechia

the Czech military has a mix of Soviet-era and more modern equipment, mostly of European origin; since 2010, the leading suppliers of military equipment to Czechia are Austria and Spain

(2019 )
Denmark
the Danish military inventory is comprised of a mix of modern European, US, and domestically-produced equipment; the US is the largest supplier of military equipment to Denmark since 2010, followed by Germany and the Netherlands; the Danish defense industry is mainly active in the production of naval vessels, defense electronics, and subcomponents of larger weapons systems, such as the US F-35 fighter aircraft (2019 est.)
Djibouti
the FAD is armed mostly with older French and Soviet-era weapons systems; since 2010, it has received limited amounts of newer equipment, with China and the US as the largest suppliers (2019 est.)
Dominican Republic
the military's inventory consists mostly of older US equipment with limited quantities of Brazilian, European, and Israeli material; since 2010, Brazil and Israel are the leading suppliers of armaments to the Dominican Republic (2019 est.)
Ecuador
the military's equipment inventory is mostly older and derived from a wide variety of sources; since 2010, the leading suppliers of military hardware are Brazil, the Netherlands, South Africa, and Spain (2019 est.)
Egypt
the EAF's inventory is comprised of a mix of domestically produced, Soviet-era, and more modern, particularly US, weapons systems; in recent years, the EAF has embarked on an extensive equipment modernization program with major purchases from a variety of suppliers; since 2010, the leading suppliers of military hardware to Egypt are France, Germany, Russia, and the US; Egypt has an established defense industry that produces a range of products from small arms to armored vehicles and naval vessels; it also has licensed and co-production agreements with several countries, including France (naval frigates) and the US (tanks) (2019 est.)
El Salvador
the FAES is dependent on a mix of imported Cold War-era platforms, largely from the US; since 2000, the FAES has received limited amounts of equipment from Chile, Israel, and the US (2019 est.)
Equatorial Guinea
the FAGE is armed with mostly second-hand Russian and Soviet-era weapons; Ukraine is the leading provider of equipment since 2010 followed by Israel (2019 est.)
Eritrea
the Eritrean Defense Forces inventory is comprised primarily of Soviet-era systems; Eritrea was under a UN arms embargo from 2009 to 2018; prior to 2009, Belarus, Bulgaria, and Russia were the leading arms suppliers (2019 est.)
Estonia
the Estonian Defense Forces have a limited inventory of Soviet-era and more modern Western weapons systems; France and the Netherlands are the leading suppliers of armaments to Estonia since 2010 (2019 est.)
Eswatini
the inventory of the UEDF consists mostly of equipment from South Africa; the only publicly recorded military acquisitions since 2010 were two secondhand helicopters from Taiwan in 2019 (2020)
Ethiopia
the ENDF's inventory is comprised mostly of Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, Russia and Ukraine are the leading suppliers of largely second-hand weapons and equipment to the ENDF, followed by China and Hungary; Ethiopia has a modest industrial defense base centered on small arms and licensed production of light-armored vehicles (2019 est.)
Fiji
the RFMF's small inventory is a mix of equipment from Australia, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, the UK, and the US; since 2010, the only recorded arms deliveries were from Australia; China has donated some non-lethal material since 2018 (2019 est.)
Finland
the inventory of the Finnish Defense Forces consists of a wide mix of mostly modern Western and domestically-produced weapons systems, as well as a limited quantity of Soviet-era equipment, particularly artillery and armored personnel carriers; since 2010, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, and the US are the leading foreign suppliers of armaments to Finland; the Finish defense industry produces a variety of military equipment, including wheeled armored vehicles and naval vessels (2019 est.)
France
the French military's inventory consists almost entirely of domestically-produced weapons systems, including some jointly-produced with other European countries; there is a limited mix of armaments from other Western countries, particularly the US; since 2010, the US is the leading foreign supplier of military hardware to France; France has a defense industry capable of manufacturing the full spectrum of air, land, and naval military weapons systems (2019 est.)
Gabon
the FDG's inventory is comprised mostly of Brazilian, French, and South African equipment; since 2010, the leading suppliers are France and South Africa (2019 est.)
Gambia, The
the GNA has a limited equipment inventory; the only reported weapons deliveries to the GNA since 2000 are second-hand patrol boats from Taiwan (2009) and one aircraft from Georgia (2004) (2019 est.)
Gaza Strip
the military wing of HAMAS is armed with light weapons, including an inventory of improvised rocket, anti-tank missile, and mortar capabilities; HAMAS acquires its weapons through smuggling or local construction; Iran provides military support to HAMAS (2019 est.)
Georgia
the Georgian Defense Forces are equipped mostly with older Russian and Soviet-era weapons; since 2010, it has received limited quantities of equipment from Bulgaria, France, and the US (2019 )
Germany
the German Federal Armed Forces inventory is mostly comprised of weapons systems produced domestically or jointly with other European countries; since 2010, the US is the leading foreign supplier of armaments to Germany, followed by the Netherlands and Switzerland; Germany's defense industry is capable of manufacturing the full spectrum of air, land, and naval military weapons systems (2019 est.)
Ghana
the inventory of the Ghana Armed Forces is a mix of Russian, Chinese, and Western equipment; the top suppliers of armaments since 2010 are China, Germany, Spain, and Russia (2019 est.)
Greece
the inventory of the Hellenic Armed Forces consists mostly of a mix of imported weapons from Europe and the US, as well as a limited number of domestically produced systems, particularly naval vessels; Germany is the leading supplier of weapons systems to Greece since 2010, followed by France and the US; Greece's defense industry is capable of producing naval vessels and associated subsystems (2019 est.)
Guatemala
the Guatemalan military inventory is small and mostly comprised of older US equipment; since 2010, Guatemala has received limited amounts of equipment from Canada, Colombia, Spain, Taiwan, and the US (2019 est.)
Guinea
the inventory of the Guinean military consists largely of ageing and outdated (mostly Soviet-era) equipment; since 2010, it has received a limited amount of equipment from France, Russia, and South Africa (2019 est.)
Guinea-Bissau
the inventory of the FARP consists of Soviet-era equipment; the only reported deliveries of military equipment to Guinea Bissau since 2015 were patrol boats from Spain in 2017 and non-lethal equipment from China in 2015 (2019 est.)
Guyana
the Guyana Defense Force's limited inventory is mostly comprised of second-hand platforms from a variety of foreign suppliers, including Brazil, China, the former Soviet Union, the UK, and the US; since 2000, Guyana has received limited amounts of military equipment from Brazil, China, Costa Rica, and the UK (2019 est.)
Haiti
N/A
Honduras
the FFAA's inventory is comprised of mostly older imported equipment from Israel, the UK, and the US; since 2010, Honduras has received limited amounts of military equipment from Colombia, Israel, Netherlands, Taiwan, and the US (2019 est.)
Hungary
the inventory of the Hungarian Defense Forces consists largely of Soviet-era weapons, with a smaller mix of more modern European and US equipment; since 2010, Hungary has received limited quantities of equipment from Czechia, Finland, France, Germany, Russia, Sweden, and the US (2019 est.)
Iceland
the Icelandic Coast Guard's inventory consists of equipment from European suppliers (2019 est.)
India
the inventory of the Indian Armed Forces consists mostly of Russian-origin equipment, along with a smaller mix of Western and domestically-produced arms; since 2010, Russia is the leading supplier of arms to India, followed by the France, Israel, the UK, and the US; India's defense industry is capable of producing a range of air, land, missile, and naval weapons systems (2019 est.)
Indonesia
the Indonesian military inventory is comprised of equipment from a wide variety of sources; since 2010, the top suppliers are China, Germany, the Netherlands, Russia, South Korea, the UK, and the US (2019 est.)
Iran
the Iranian military's inventory includes a mix of domestically-produced and mostly older foreign equipment largely of Chinese, Russian, Soviet, and US origin (US equipment acquired prior to the Islamic Revolution in 1979); weapons imports from Western countries are restricted by international sanctions; since 2010, Iran has received equipment from Belarus, China, and Russia; Iran has a defense industry with the capacity to develop, produce, support, and sustain air, land, missile, and naval weapons programs (2019 est.)
Iraq
the Iraqi military inventory is comprised of Russian and Soviet-era equipment combined with newer European- and US-sourced platforms; since 2010, Russia and the US are the leading suppliers of military hardware to Iraq (2019 est.)
Ireland
the Irish Defense Forces have a small inventory of imported weapons systems from a variety of European countries, as well as South Africa and the US; the UK is the leading supplier of military hardware to Ireland since 2010 (2019 est.)
Israel
the majority of the IDF's inventory is comprised of weapons that are domestically-produced or imported from Europe and the US; since 2010, Germany and the US are the leading suppliers of weapons to Israel; Israel has a broad defense industrial base that can develop, produce, support, and sustain a wide variety of weapons systems for both domestic use and export, particularly armored vehicles, unmanned aerial systems, air defense, and guided missiles (2019 est.)
Italy
the Italian Armed Forces' inventory includes a mix of domestically-produced, jointly-produced, and imported European and US weapons systems; the US is the leading supplier of weapons to Italy since 2010, followed by Germany; the Italian defense industry is capable of producing equipment across all the military domains with particular strengths in naval vessels, aircraft, and helicopters; it also participates in joint development and production of advanced weapons systems with other European countries and the US (2019 est.)
Jamaica
the Jamaica Defense Force's inventory is limited and features mostly older equipment imported from a variety of foreign suppliers, including the UK and US; since 2010, Jamaica has received limited quantities of military equipment from Australia, Austria, the Netherlands, and the US (2019 est.)
Japan
the JSDF is equipped with a mix of imported and domestically-produced equipment; Japan is capable of producing a wide range of air, ground, and naval weapons systems; the majority of its weapons imports are from the US and some domestically-produced weapons are US-origin and manufactured under license (2019)
Jordan
the JAF inventory is comprised of a wide mix of imported weapons, mostly second-hand equipment from Europe and the US; since 2010, the Netherlands and the US are the leading suppliers of military hardware to Jordan (2019 est.)
Kazakhstan
the Kazakh military's inventory is comprised of mostly older Russian and Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, Russia remains by far the leading supplier of weapons systems, but Kazakhstan has also received weapons systems from China, Germany, Israel, South Africa, Turkey, Ukraine, and the US (2019 est.)
Kenya
the KDF's inventory traditionally carried mostly older or second-hand Western weapons systems, particularly from France, the UK, and the US; however, since the 2000s it has sought to modernize and diversify its imports; the top suppliers since 2010 are China, Italy, Jordan, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Ukraine, and the US (2019 est.)
Korea, North
the KPA is equipped mostly with older weapon systems originally acquired from the former Soviet Union, Russia, and China; North Korea manufactures copies and provides some upgrades to these weapon systems; it also has a robust domestic ballistic missile program based largely on missiles acquired from the former Soviet Union; since 2010, there were no publicly-reported transfers of weapons to North Korea; between 2000 and 2010, Russia was the only recorded provider of arms (2019 est.)
Korea, South
the Republic of Korea Armed Forces are equipped with a mix of domestically-produced and imported weapons systems; domestic production includes armored fighting vehicles, artillery, aircraft, and naval ships; the top foreign weapons supplier is the US and some domestically-produced systems are built under US license; Germany is the second largest supplier of armaments since 2010 (2019 est.)
Kosovo
the Kosovo Security Force is equipped with small arms and light vehicles only; its only recorded delivery since 2010 was light-armored patrol vehicles from Turkey (2019 est.)
Kuwait
the inventory of the Kuwaiti Armed Forces consists of a range of European- and US-sourced weapons systems; the US is the leading supplier of arms to Kuwait since 2010 (2019 est.)
Kyrgyzstan
the Kyrgyz Armed Forces' inventory is comprised of older Russian and Soviet-era equipment; outside of a small delivery by China in 2019, Russia continues to be the only supplier of weapons systems to Kyrgyzstan (2020)
Laos
the LPAF is armed largely with weapons from the former Soviet Union with a smaller mix of more modern weapons from China, Russia, and Ukraine; since 2010, China and Russia are the top suppliers of military hardware to Laos (2019 est.)
Latvia
the Latvian military's inventory is limited and consists of a European, Israeli, and US weapons systems; since 2010, it has received mostly second-hand equipment from Austria, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, the UK, and the US (2019 est.)
Lebanon
the LAF inventory includes a wide mix of mostly older equipment, largely from the US and European countries, particularly France and Germany; since 2010, the US is the leading supplier of armaments (mostly second hand equipment) to Lebanon (2019 est.)
Lesotho
the LDF's inventory consists of older equipment from a variety of countries; the only reported delivery to the LDF since 2007 was two helicopters from France in 2017 (2019 est.)
Liberia
the AFL has almost no hardware as nearly all aircraft, equipment, materiel, and facilities were damaged or destroyed during the country's civil war; it has received little new equipment outside of ammunition, small arms, and trucks from China in 2008 and boats donated to the Coast Guard by the US in 2011 and 2016 (2019)
Libya
both the forces of the Government of National Accord and the Libyan National Army are largely equipped with weapons of Russian or Soviet origin (2020 est.)
Lithuania
the Lithuanian Armed Forces' inventory is mostly a mix of Western weapons systems and Soviet-era equipment (primarily aircraft and helicopters); Germany and the UK are the leading suppliers of armaments to Lithuania since 2010 (2019 est.)
Luxembourg
the inventory of Luxembourg's Army is a small mix of European and US equipment; since 2010, it has received small quantities of equipment from Germany, Norway, and Sweden (2019 est.)
Madagascar
the PAF's inventory consists mostly of ageing Soviet-era equipment; since 2010,  it has received limited amounts of second-hand equipment from South Africa and France (2019 est.)
Malawi
the Malawi Defense Force inventory is comprised of mostly obsolescent or second-hand equipment from France, Germany, South Africa, and the UK; since 2010, it has taken deliveries of additional second-hand equipment from South Africa (2012-15) and the UK (2015), as well as new patrol boats from China (2019) and non-lethal equipment donated by the US (2019) (2019)
Malaysia
the Malaysian Armed Forces field a diverse mix of imported weapons systems; the chief suppliers since 2010 are Germany, South Korea, Spain, and Turkey (2019)
Maldives
India has provided most of the equipment in the MNDF's inventory (2020)
Mali
the FAMa's inventory consists primarily of Soviet-era equipment, although in recent years it has received limited quantities of mostly second-hand armaments from a variety of countries; since 2010, the leading suppliers have been Brazil, Bulgaria, France, Russia, South Africa, Spain, and the United Arab Emirates (2019 est.)
Malta
the small inventory of the Armed Forces of Malta consists of equipment from a mix of European countries, particularly Italy, and the US; since 2010, Italy and the US are the only providers of military equipment to Malta (2019 est.)
Mauritania
the Mauritanian Armed Forces' inventory is limited and made up largely of older French and Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, Mauritania has received mostly secondhand military equipment from a variety of suppliers, including Brazil, China, France, and Turkey (2019 est.)
Mauritius
the Special Mobile Force's inventory includes mostly second-hand equipment from France and the UK; since 2014, India has provided the majority of the Coast Guard's equipment, including patrol boats and aircraft (2019 est.)
Mexico
the Mexican military inventory includes a mix of domestically-produced and imported equipment from a variety of mostly Western suppliers; since 2010, France, Spain, and the US are the leading suppliers of military hardware to Mexico; Mexico's defense industry produces naval vessels and light armored vehicles (2019 est.)
Moldova
the Moldovan military's inventory is limited and almost entirely comprised of older Russian and Soviet-era equipment; since 2000, it has received small amounts of donated material from other nations, including the US (2019 est.)
Mongolia
the MAF are armed with Soviet-era equipment supplemented by deliveries of second-hand Russian weapons; since 2010, Russia is the sole provider of armaments to Mongolia (2019 est.)
Montenegro
the inventory of the Armed Forces of Montenegro is small and consists mostly of equipment inherited from the former Yugoslavia military, with a limited mix of other imported systems, such as French-made helicopters; since 2010, it has received small quantities of equipment from Austria, Turkey, and the US (2019 est.)
Morocco
the Moroccan military's inventory is comprised of mostly older French and US equipment; since 2010, France and the US are the leading suppliers of weapons to Morocco, followed by China and the Netherlands (2019 est.)
Mozambique
the FADM's inventory consists primarily of Soviet-era equipment, although in recent years it has received limited quantities of newer equipment, particularly aircraft and maritime patrol craft (mostly as aid/donations); India is the leading supplier since 2010 (2019 )
Namibia
the inventory of the Namibian Defense Force consists mostly of Soviet-era equipment; China is the leading supplier of weapons to Namibia since 2010 (2019 est.)
Nepal
the Army's inventory includes a mix of older equipment largely of British, Chinese, Indian, Russian, and South African origin; since 2010, China, Italy, and Russia are the top suppliers of military hardware to Nepal (2019 est.)
Netherlands
the inventory of the Netherlands Armed Forces consists of a mix of domestically-produced and modern European- and US-sourced equipment; since 2010, the US is the leading supplier of weapons systems to the Netherlands, followed by Germany, Italy, and Sweden; the Netherlands has an advanced domestic defense industry that focuses on armored vehicles, naval ships, and air defense systems; it also participates with the US and other European countries on joint development and production of advanced weapons systems (2019)
New Zealand
NZDF is equipped mostly with imported weapons and equipment from Western suppliers; Australia, France, and the US are the leading suppliers since 2010 (2019 est.)
Nicaragua
the Nicaraguan military's inventory includes mostly Russian/Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, Russia is the leading arms supplier to Nicaragua (2019 est.)
Niger
the FAN's inventory consists of a wide variety of foreign-supplied weapons, including Chinese, French, German, Russian, and US; since 2015, the FAN has received limited amounts of equipment from China, France, Russia, Sweden, and the US, some of which were donations (2019 est.)
Nigeria
the Nigerian Armed Forces' inventory consists of a wide variety of imported weapons systems of Chinese, European, Middle Eastern, Russian (including Soviet-era), and US origin; since 2010, the leading suppliers are China, France, Italy, Russia, Ukraine, and the US; Nigeria has been the largest arms importer in sub-Saharan Africa since 2014; Nigeria is also developing a defense-industry capacity, including small arms, armored personnel vehicle, and small-scale naval production (2019 est.)
North Macedonia
the inventory of North Macedonia's Army consists mostly of Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, it has received small amounts of equipment from Ireland and Turkey (2019 est.)
Norway
the Norwegian Armed Forces inventory includes mostly imported European and US weapons systems, as well as a limited mix of domestically-produced equipment, particularly small naval craft; since 2010, the US is the leading supplier of weapons systems to Norway, followed by France, Italy, South Korea, and Spain (2019 est.)
Oman
the SAF's inventory includes mostly a mix of older and some more modern British and US weapons systems, with smaller quantities of equipment from South Africa and a variety of European countries; since 2010, the UK and the US are the leading suppliers of armaments to Oman (2019 est.)
Pakistan
the Pakistan military inventory includes a broad mix of equipment, primarily from China, France, Ukraine, the UK, and the US; since 2010, China and the US are the leading suppliers of arms to Pakistan; Pakistan also has a large domestic defense industry capable of upgrading existing air, land, and sea weapons systems (2019 est.)
Palau
since 2018, Australia and Japan have provided patrol boats to the Palau's Division of Marine Law Enforcement (2020)
Panama
Panama's security forces do not maintain heavy military equipment, instead focusing on light air transport, patrol, and surveillance capabilities; since 2010, Italy and the US have been the leading suppliers to the security forces (2019 est.)
Papua New Guinea
the PNGDF has a limited inventory consisting of a diverse mix of foreign-supplied weapons and equipment; Papau New Guinea receives most of its military assistance from Australia; since 2010, it has also received equipment from China and New Zealand (2019 est.)
Paraguay
the Paraguayan military forces inventory is comprised of mostly older equipment from a variety of foreign suppliers, particularly Brazil and the US; since 2010, Paraguay has acquired limited quantities of mostly second-hand military equipment from Argentina, Brazil, Israel, Spain, Taiwan, and the US (2019 est.)
Peru
the Peruvian military's inventory is a mix of mostly older equipment from a wide variety of suppliers, including Brazil, Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the US; the leading suppliers of military equipment since 2010 are Italy, Russia, and South Korea (2019 est.)
Philippines
the AFP is equipped with a mix of imported weapons systems, particularly second-hand equipment from the US; since 2014, its top weapons suppliers are Brazil, Indonesia, South Korea, and the US (2019 est.)
Poland
the inventory of the Polish Armed Forces consists of a mix of Soviet-era and more modern Western weapons systems; since 2010, the leading suppliers of armaments to Poland are Finland, Germany, Italy, and the US (2019 est.)
Portugal
the Portuguese Armed Forces inventory includes mostly European and US-origin weapons systems along with a smaller mix of domestically-produced equipment; since 2010, Germany and the US are the leading suppliers of armaments to Portugal; Portugal's defense industry is primarily focused on shipbuilding (2019 est.)
Qatar
the Qatari military's inventory includes a mix of older and modern weapons systems, mostly from the US and Europe, particularly France, Germany, and the UK; the leading providers of armaments to Qatar since 2010 are France, Germany, and the US; Qatar is scheduled to receive several ships from Italy beginning in 2021 and a large shipment of fighter aircraft from the UK in 2022 (2019 est.)
Romania
the inventory of the Romanian Armed Forces is comprised mostly of Soviet-era and older domestically-produced weapons systems; there is also a smaller mix of Western-origin equipment; Italy, Portugal (second-hand fighter aircraft), and the US are the leading suppliers of armaments to Romania since 2010 (2019 est.)
Russia
the Russian Federation's military and paramilitary services are equipped with domestically-produced weapons systems, although since 2010 Russia has imported limited amounts of military hardware from Czechia, France, Israel, Italy, Turkey, and Ukraine; the Russian defense industry is capable of designing, developing, and producing a full range of advanced air, land, missile, and naval systems (2019)
Rwanda
the RDF's inventory includes mostly Soviet-era and older Western - mostly French and South African - equipment; Russia is the largest supplier of equipment to the RDF since 2010 (2019 est.)
Saudi Arabia
the inventory of the Saudi military forces, including the SANG, includes a mix of mostly modern weapons systems from the US and Europe, particularly France and the UK; since 2010, France, the UK, and the US are the leading suppliers of armaments, followed by Germany, Spain, and Canada (2019 est.)
Senegal
the SAF inventory includes mostly older or second-hand equipment from a variety of countries, including France, South Africa, and Russia/former Soviet Union; in recent years, the SAF has attempted to modernize, particularly its air force; China and France are the leading suppliers of newer military hardware to the SAF since 2010 (2019 est.)
Serbia
the inventory of the Serbian Armed Forces consists of Russian and Soviet-era weapons systems; since 2010, most of its weapons imports have come from Russia, but it has also received equipment from Belarus (second-hand aircraft), Germany, Montenegro (second-hand aircraft), and the US (2019 est.)
Seychelles
the SPDF's inventory primarily consists of Soviet-era equipment delivered in the 1970s and 1980s; since 2010, China and India are the leading suppliers of newer equipment (mostly donations of patrol boats and aircraft) (2019 est.)
Sierra Leone
the RSLAF's small inventory includes a mix of Soviet-origin and other older foreign-supplied equipment; since 2010, it has received limited quantities of material from China and South Africa (2019 est.)
Singapore
the SAF has a diverse and largely modern mix of domestically-produced and imported weapons; Singapore has the most developed arms industry in Southeast Asia and is also the largest importer of weapons; the chief suppliers since 2010 are France, Germany, Spain, and the US (2019 est.)
Slovakia
the inventory of the Slovakian military consists mostly of Soviet-era platforms; since 2010, it has imported limited quantities of equipment from China, Czechia, Italy, Russia, and the US (2019 est.)
Slovenia
the inventory of the Slovenian Armed Forces is a mix of Soviet-era and limited quantities of more modern Western equipment; since 2010, it has received weapons systems from Finland, Russia, and the US (2019 est.)
Somalia
the SNA inventory includes a variety of older, second-hand equipment largely from Italy, Russia, South Africa, and the UK; since 2015, it has received limited quantities of second-hand equipment from China, France, Italy, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates, usually as aid/donations (2019 est.)
South Africa
the SANDF's inventory consists of a mix of domestically-produced and foreign-supplied equipment; South Africa's domestic defense industry produced most of the Army's major weapons systems (some were jointly-produced with foreign companies), while the Air Force and Navy inventories include a mix of European, Israeli, and US-origin weapons systems; since 2010, Sweden was the largest supplier of weapons to the SANDF (2019 est.)
South Sudan
the SSPDF inventory is primarily of Soviet origin; South Sudan was under a UN arms embargo through May 2020; from 2010 to 2015, Russian and the United Arab Emirates were the leading suppliers of arms and equipment (2020)
Spain
the inventory of the Spanish military is comprised of domestically-produced and imported Western weapons systems; France, Germany, and the US are the leading suppliers of military hardware since 2010; Spain's defense industry manufactures land, air, and sea weapons systems and is integrated within the European defense-industrial sector (2019 est.)
Sri Lanka
the Sri Lankan military inventory consists mostly of Chinese and Russian-origin equipment, as well as smaller amounts from Israel, the UK, and the US; since 2000, China, India, Israel, and the US have been the leading suppliers of arms to Sri Lanka (2019 est.)
Sudan
the SAF's inventory includes a mix of Chinese, Russian, Soviet, Ukrainian, and domestically-produced weapons systems; since 2010, the leading arms providers to the SAF are Belarus, China, Russia, and Ukraine; Sudan has a domestic arms industry that manufactures ammunition, small arms, and armored vehicles, largely based on older Chinese and Russian systems (2019 est.)
Suriname
the Suriname Army inventory includes a mix of equipment from several foreign suppliers, including Brazil, China, India, and the US; since 2010, Suriname has received small quantities of military hardware from Colombia, France, India, and the US (2019 est.)
Sweden
the inventory of the Swedish Armed Forces is comprised of domestically-produced and imported Western weapons systems; since 2010, the US is the leading supplier of military hardware to Sweden, followed by France and Germany; Sweden's defense industry is capable of providing most of the military's equipment requirements, including advanced aircraft and submarines (2019 est.)
Switzerland
the Swiss Armed Forces inventory includes a mix of domestically-produced and imported weapons systems; the US is the leading supplier of military armaments to Switzerland since 2010; the Swiss defense industry produces a range of military land vehicles (2019 est.)
Syria
the SAF's inventory is comprised mostly of Russian and Soviet-era equipment; since 2010, Russia has supplied nearly all of Syria's imported weapons systems, although China and Iran have also provided military equipment (2019 est.)
Taiwan
the Taiwan military is armed mostly with second-hand weapons and equipment provided by the US; Taiwan also has a domestic defense industry capable of upgrading some weapons systems and building surface naval craft and submarines (2019 est.)
Tajikistan
the Tajikistan Armed Forces' inventory is comprised of older Russian and Soviet-era equipment; it has received limited quantities of weapons systems since 2010, most of which was secondhand material from Russia, followed by Belarus and China (2019 est.)
Tanzania
the TPDF inventory includes mostly Soviet-era and older Chinese equipment; since 2010, China is the leading supplier of arms to the TPDF (2019 est.)
Thailand
the RTARF has a diverse array of foreign-supplied weapons systems, including a large amount of obsolescent or second-hand US equipment; since 2015, the top suppliers are China, South Korea, Ukraine, and the US (2019 est.)
Timor-Leste
Timor-Leste Defense Force's limited inventory consists of equipment donated by other countries; the only known deliveries of major arms to Timor-Leste since 2010 are naval patrol craft from China and South Korea (2019 est.)
Togo
the FAT's small inventory is a mix of older Brazilian, British, French, German, Russian/Soviet, and US equipment; since 2010, France is the leading supplier of military hardware to Togo (2019 est.)
Trinidad and Tobago
the TTDF's ground force inventory includes only light weapons; the Coast Guard and Air Guard field mostly second-hand equipment from a mix of countries, including Australia, China, the Netherlands, the UK, and the US (2019 est.)
Tunisia
the Tunisian military's inventory includes mostly older or secondhand US and European equipment; since 2010, the Netherlands and US are the leading suppliers of arms to Tunisia (2019 est.)
Turkey
the Turkish Armed Forces inventory is mostly comprised of a mix of domestically-produced and Western weapons systems, although in recent years, Turkey has also acquired some Chinese, Russian, and South Korean equipment; since 2010, the US is the leading provider of armaments to Turkey, followed by Italy, South Korea, and Spain (2019 est.)
Turkmenistan
the inventory for Turkmenistan's military is comprised almost entirely of older Russian and Soviet-era weapons systems, although in recent years, Turkmenistan has opened itself up to Chinese and Western equipment; since 2010, China, Italy, Russia, and Turkey are the leading arms suppliers to Turkmenistan (2019 est.)
Uganda
the UPDF's inventory is mostly older Russian/Soviet-era equipment with a limited mix of more modern Russian- and Western-origin arms; since 2010, the leading suppliers of arms to the UPDF are Russia and Ukraine (2019 )
Ukraine
the Ukrainian military is equipped mostly with older Russian and Soviet-era weapons systems; since 2010, it has imported limited quantities of weapons from several European countries, as well as Canada, the US, and the United Arab Emirates; Ukraine has a broad defense industry capable of building Soviet-era land systems and maintaining and upgrading Soviet-era combat aircraft, as well as missile and air defense systems (2019 est.)
United Arab Emirates
the UAE Armed Forces inventory is comprised of mostly modern imported equipment; since 2010, the UAE has acquired military equipment from more than 20 countries with the US as the leading supplier, followed by France and Russia (2019 est.)
United Kingdom
the inventory of the British military is comprised of a mix of domestically-produced and imported Western weapons systems; the US is the leading supplier of armaments to the UK since 2010; the UK defense industry is capable of producing a wide variety of air, land, and sea weapons systems (2019 est.)
United States
the US military's inventory is comprised almost entirely of domestically-produced weapons systems (some assembled with foreign components) along with a smaller mix of imported equipment from a variety of Western countries; since 2010, Germany and the UK are the leading suppliers, followed by Australia, Canada, France, the Netherlands, and Norway; the US defense industry is capable of designing, developing, maintaining, and producing the full spectrum of weapons systems (2019 est.)
Uruguay
the Armed Forces of Uruguay inventory includes a wide variety of older or second-hand equipment imported from a range of suppliers, including Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Russia, Spain, and the US (2019 est.)
Uzbekistan
the Uzbek Armed Forces use mainly Soviet-era equipment, although since 2010 they have received weapons and aircraft from a variety of sources, including China, France, Russia, Spain, Turkey, and the US (2019 est.)
Venezuela
the FANB inventory is mainly of Chinese and Russian origin with a smaller mix of equipment from Western countries such as France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, the UK, and the US; since 2010, China and Russia are the top suppliers of military hardware to Venezuela (2019 est.)
Vietnam
the PAVN is armed largely with weapons and equipment from Russia and the former Soviet Union; Russia remains the main supplier of newer PAVN military equipment, although in recent years Vietnam has begun diversifying its procurement with purchases from other countries including Belarus, India, Israel, and Ukraine (2019 est.)
West Bank
the Palestinian Authority Security Forces are armed mostly with small arms and light weapons, although since 2007, they have received limited amounts of heavier equipment from Jordan (armored personnel carriers) and Russia (armored personnel carriers and transport helicopters) (2019 est.)
Yemen
the inventory of the Yemeni Government forces consists primarily of Russian and Soviet-era equipment, although much of it has been lost in the current conflict; since 2010, it has received limited amounts of equipment from a variety of countries, including Belarus, Czechia, Jordan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, UAE, Ukraine, and the US (2019 est.)
Zambia
the ZDF's inventory is largely comprised of Soviet-era and older Chinese- and Russian-origin equipment; since 2010, China is the leading supplier of arms to Zambia (2019 est.)
Zimbabwe
the ZDF inventory is comprised mostly of older Chinese- and Russian-origin equipment; since 2000, China is the leading arms supplier to the ZDF, although there are no recorded deliveries of weapons since 2006 (2019 est.)