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A 12 Article 128.
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A 12 Article 128.
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Sketches from Johnson's notebook.
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To test its radar cross section, a full-size model of the A 12 was placed in various positions on a pylon as radar readings were taken.
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To test its radar cross section, a full-size model of the A 12 was placed in various positions on a pylon as radar readings were taken.
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CIA’s A-12 “drivers” and managers: (l. to r.) Layton, Sullivan, Vojvodich, Barrett, Weeks, Collins, Ray, BGen Ledford, Skliar, Perkins, Holbury, Kelly, and squadron commander Col. Slater.
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CIA’s A-12 “drivers” and managers: (l. to r.) Layton, Sullivan, Vojvodich, Barrett, Weeks, Collins, Ray, BGen Ledford, Skliar, Perkins, Holbury, Kelly, and squadron commander Col. Slater.
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Patches made for OXCART crew members. CYGNUS was the name given the A-12 in testing. The 1129th SAS was the unit designation of the A-12 team assigned to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa.
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“The A-12 ‘practically spawned its own industrial base’ and the 2,400 or so machinists, mechanics, and fabricators could do their own milling and forging.” The sign at the top, “Stamp out F.O.D.” was an exhortation to “Stamp Out Foreign-object Damage,” a problem of engine failure sometimes caused by small objects inadvertently dropped and left in nacelles during fabrication.
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“The A-12 ‘practically spawned its own industrial base’ and the 2,400 or so machinists, mechanics, and fabricators could do their own milling and forging.” The sign at the top, “Stamp out F.O.D.” was an exhortation to “Stamp Out Foreign-object Damage,” a problem of engine failure sometimes caused by small objects inadvertently dropped and left in nacelles during fabrication.
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Dealing with the extreme temperatures of Mach 3+ flight was the most formidable challenge.
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Dealing with the extreme temperatures of Mach 3+ flight was the most formidable challenge.
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The J58 jet engine during a static test. A modified version of an engine designed for another program four years earlier, the jet generated as much power as the turbines of the ocean liner the Queen Mary.
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The J58 jet engine during a static test. A modified version of an engine designed for another program four years earlier, the jet generated as much power as the turbines of the ocean liner the Queen Mary.
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In this photo, one of the first of the A-12 released by CIA, the adjustable inlet cones in front of the en-gines are clearly visible. Called “spikes,” the devices regulated the incoming air flow to maximize thrust and prevent interruptions in fuel combustion at high speeds.
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In this photo, one of the first of the A-12 released by CIA, the adjustable inlet cones in front of the en-gines are clearly visible. Called “spikes,” the devices regulated the incoming air flow to maximize thrust and prevent interruptions in fuel combustion at high speeds.
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Hauled disassembled and in boxes to its Nevada test site, the A-12 posed a significant traffic hazard. Once, an oncoming bus grazed a crate.
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Hauled disassembled and in boxes to its Nevada test site, the A-12 posed a significant traffic hazard. Once, an oncoming bus grazed a crate.
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Throughout testing, flight procedures evolved; in effect, pilots were testing and training simultane-ously. Here, the only A-12 trainer built—the “Titanium Goose”—is about to refuel, a process that took the A-12 close to stall speed when it was filled up.
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Throughout testing, flight procedures evolved; in effect, pilots were testing and training simultane-ously. Here, the only A-12 trainer built—the “Titanium Goose”—is about to refuel, a process that took the A-12 close to stall speed when it was filled up.
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A rare photo of an airborne A-12 with landing gear visible, here on its second flight ever.
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A rare photo of an airborne A-12 with landing gear visible, here on its second flight ever.
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YF-12A
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YF-12A
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All of the OXCART’s operational missions were flown out of Kadena Air Base on Okinawa, shown here.
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All of the OXCART’s operational missions were flown out of Kadena Air Base on Okinawa, shown here.
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OXCART’s first mission over Southeast Asia, 31 May 1967. With pilot Vojvodich in the cockpit, Article 131 refueled three times during its3 hour 39 minute flight.
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OXCART’s first mission over Southeast Asia, 31 May 1967. With pilot Vojvodich in the cockpit, Article 131 refueled three times during its3 hour 39 minute flight.
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This image of Hanoi area was taken during the fourth mission, on 30 June 1967.
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OXCART’s first mission over Southeast Asia, 31 May 1967. With pilot Vojvodich in the cockpit, Article 131 refueled three times during its3 hour 39 minute flight.
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With the OXCART program cancelled, the A-12s flew back to the United States and were placed in stor-age.
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With the OXCART program cancelled, the A-12s flew back to the United States and were placed in storage.
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In this photo, one of the first of the A-12 released by CIA, the adjustable inlet cones in front of the engines are clearly visible. Called “spikes,” the devices regulated the incoming air flow to maximize thrust and prevent interruptions in fuel combustion at high speeds.
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Patch made for OXCART crew members. CYGNUS was the name given the A-12 in testing.
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Throughout testing, flight procedures evolved; in effect, pilots were testing and training simultaneously. Here, the only A-12 trainer built—the “Titanium Goose”—is about to refuel, a process that took the A-12 close to stall speed when it was filled up.
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OXCART’s first mission over Southeast Asia, 31 May 1967. With pilot Vojvodich in the cockpit, Article 131 refueled three times during its 3 hour 39 minute flight.
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This image of Hanoi area was taken during the fourth mission, on 30 June 1967.
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To test its radar cross section, a full-size model of the A-12 was placed in various positions on a pylon as radar readings were taken.
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A-12 Article 128
Agency Image Patches made for OXCART crew members
Patches made for OXCART crew members. CYGNUS was the name given the A-12 in testing. The 1129th SAS was the unit designation of the A-12 team assigned to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa.
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“Untouchable” by artist Dru Blair.