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Internal Security and Counterintelligence Application of the Critical—Path Method to Evaluate Insider Risks

Internal Security and Counterintelligence Application of the CriticalPath Method to Evaluate Insider Risks

Eric Shaw and Laura Sellers

Governments and institutions of many kinds have faced the danger of hostile acts by insiders from time immemorial. In the case of the US government, such hostile acts have included betrayals by employees who supplied secrets to hostile powers, committed sabotage, and fatally attacked fellow employees. After each of these events investigators produced reports which, in 20/20 hindsight, assessed the damage and demonstrated that warnings of risks had been missed. These case-based, “One should have seen the writing on the wall” exercises often produce increased awareness and some revisions in policies and prac­tices in screening, adjudication, and risk assessment. But when these cases are reviewed in depth, it becomes clear that a lack of appreciation exists for the factors that increase the risk that insiders will undertake hostile acts against their organizations.

Our purpose in this article is to draw on the most recent and comprehensive empirical studies of insider hostile acts—ranging from formal academic efforts to collections of in-depth case reports—to demonstrate that there exists a common set of factors and a similar pattern of individual and organizational be­havior across the many occurrences during recent years.

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All statements of fact, opinion, or analysis expressed in this journal are those of the authors. Nothing in any of the articles should be construed as asserting or implying US government endorsement of their factual statements and interpretations. Articles by non-US government employees are copyrighted.


Posted: Jul 10, 2015 11:30 AM
Last Updated: Jul 10, 2015 11:30 AM