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Agency PageIntelligence for the Policy Chiefs
Intelligence for the Policy Chiefs, James P. Hanrahan. In this discussion of intelligence needs at the top national level and some specific ways in which they are filled, I shall be speaking from the perspective of CIA's Deputy Director for Intelligence. I will not attempt to speak for the other organizations of the Washington intelligence community or pretend to be presenting the whole picture...
Agency PageAutomation for Information Control
Automation for Information Control, Paul A. Borel. Last July the Saturday Review, in a special issue on the automation revolution, equated the computer with the atomic bomb as a technological development formidable enough to make a turning point in human history. Some months earlier a Newsweek report entitled "Good-by to Gutenberg" gave readers a glimpse of other things to come in the field of information technology: a photosensitive crystal the size of a sugar lump that is capable of containing images of 100,000 pages; a lensless photographic system which could lead to three-dimensional home television; a no-contact, no-pressure printing technique that can write on sand, print a message on a pizza, or put a trademark on a raw egg yolk. Marshall McLuhan, in Understanding Media-the Extensions of Man, predicts that books and newspapers will in time no longer exist, that publishing will give way to an active servicing of the human mind through research packages done to suit individual needs...
Agency PageAutomation for Information Control
Automation for Information Control
Agency PageAutomation for Information Control
Automation for Information Control
Agency PageThe Kidnapping of the Lunik
The Kidnapping of the Lunik, Sydney Wesley Finer. A number of years ago the Soviet Union toured several countries with an exhibition of its industrial and economic achievements. There were the standard displays of industrial machinery, soft goods, and models of power stations and nuclear equipment. Of greater interest were apparent models of the Sputnik and Lunik space vehicles. U.S. intelligence twice gained extended access to the Lunik, the second time by borrowing it overnight and returning it before the Soviets missed it. This is the story of the borrowing, which required the efforts of many people and close cooperation between covert and overt intelligence components...
Agency PageThe Kidnapping of the Lunik
The Kidnapping of the Lunik
Agency PageA New Kind of Air Targeting
A New Kind of Air Targeting, William A. Tidwell. Military events that form historical watersheds are not always as clearly discernible as the battle of Waterloo or the invasion of Normandy. For this reason it might be of service to later historians for us to venture an indiscretion and register at this point the possibility that the 13th of November 1964 marked the beginning of the decline of "wars of national liberation." On that date ten A-1H fighter-bombers belonging to the Vietnamese Air Force successfully attacked a small Viet Cong base hidden away in the forest a few miles west of Saigon. This was the first attack launched against a guerrilla base area in South Vietnam with the aid of newly developed targeting techniques which have subsequently been used with increasing effect to harass the Viet Cong in territory they previously occupied unmolested...
Agency PageA Staff Agents Second Thoughts
A Staff Agents Second Thoughts, Louis Boifeuillette. Some time ago I wrote you about my first two years in Songhai, West Africa, where I was covered as representative of a well-known American firm, the Hefner Brewing Company, promoting sales in the former French colony. Originally, you recall, Hefner had planned to build a brewery there, but the Songhai government, which was to have shared in the project, backed out, largely as a result of its pro-Communist and anti-U.S. leanings. Then there had developed, at time of my last writing, a quite acute foreign exchange shortage for which the government's stupid and anti-Western economic policies were much to blame-and this was seriously curtailing business activity. I should like you to know how this all turned out and to share with you some further ideas about staff agent projects...
Agency PageWhich Way Did They Go?
Which Way Did They Go? Takemi Miyagi. Now that more than twenty years have passed, it is of a certain wry interest to consider what happened to the members of the organizations which made up Imperial Japanese Intelligence. When the war ended, its officers, spread rather widely about the world, came home to a land that had no further use for their services and to an immediate future in which, were they to continue to exercise their considerable professional talents, they could find employment only as mercenaries of the occupying power. After the initial period of resettlement and inevitable interrogation, many of them chose to do just that...
Agency PageThe Illustrious Career of Arkadiy Harting
The Illustrious Career of Arkadiy Harting, Rita T. Kronenbitter. To the Russian revolutionaries of all colors the life of Abraham Hackelman, as he was originally named, was one of endless and utmost infamy. He was a traitor to his ethnic group, an informer, spy, provocateur, impostor, and the most ruthless bloodhound of the Tsarist regime. When his true identity was exposed in 1909 at the height of his career as Arkadiy Harting, the press of western Europe was filled with accounts of his betrayals and activities as a master spy on behalf of the political police and finally as director of its foreign service, the Paris Okhrana. Among the files of the Paris station there are preserved several thick volumes of clippings from European newspapers giving the revolutionaries' version of the life of this extraordinary and by them most hated man. Writers competed with each other in describing him in the strongest terms of dread and repugnance...
Agency PageThe Illustrious Career of Arkadiy Harting
The Illustrious Career of Arkadiy Harting
Agency PageThe Mare's Nest by David Irving. Book review by Edwin R. Walker
The Mare's Nest by David Erving. Book review by Edwin R. Walker. Confronted by a really good book and an outstandingly bad one, a reviewer has the clear duty to warn against the latter. Let me begin, therefore, by advising you that The Battle of the V-Weapons is to be avoided as the plague. It is a shoddy, ill-conceived, inadequately researched, badly written piece of journalistic rubbish which is as near to being a non-book as anything to be found in a cloth binding. The Mare's Nest, on the other hand, has everything but sex: a great plot (World War II); an unbeatable cast of characters (Churchill, Hitler, Himmler, Von Braun, et al.) ; human interest (Lord Cherwell's vendetta against Duncan Sandys) ; fascinating side trips (e.g., the aluminized explosives scandal) ; and, above everything, suspense (Will British Intelligence unmask the Diabolical Schemes of German Science in time to save London?). Best of all, it abounds in lessons for the intelligence community...