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Microtechnology

microtechnology, implications for advances in,
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Microtechnology

perhaps best illustrated in Figure 10, showing a full superheterodyne receiver, including antenna, audio section, and battery, inside a pencil. The system runs on two hearing-aid batteries and performs as well as any conventional portable.
Some Future Goals
With systems like those described above available, the intelligence community can begin to approach operational problems from an entirely different point of view. Problems that were impossible just a few years ago have become solvable through micropower techniques. When a communications-quality receiver considerably smaller than a package of cigarettes can be operated from the light of a candle, battery life and resupply no longer trouble an agent in hostile territory. The problems are not radically different, but the range of possible solutions has been tremendously broadened.
The scope of this technology can be illustrated by a few advanced concepts as listed below. These are at present either undergoing development or being conceptually explored.
High-density digital storage: The fabrication of a microminiature unit capable of storing 200,000 bits of digital information in a cubic inch. This unit, operating on a 10-milliwatt total power drain, will make on-site processing or storage a reasonable design requirement in future intelligence collection systems.
A 50- to 10,000 megahertz surveillance receiver in a five-pound microminiature package. Putting into five pounds what ordinarily requires a full rack of equipment has enormous implications for the size and range of the reconnaissance vehicle.
Distributed jammers.   Considering the high efficiency of the micropower transmitters, it is reasonable to consider deploying vast arrays of low-power oscillators in the area of any potential electromagnetic intruder. An orbital vehicle would be particularly susceptible to such jammers since they could be put into orbittoo and powered by the sun.
A 6-bit analog-to-digital converter powered by one penlight cell and one cell 5/s" in diameter by 7/32" long. The life expectancy of the batteries would be ten years.
The remarkable nature of such developments leads one to speculate whether they are about to reach a fundamental limit that nature has surely set.   Many people like to draw comparisons between the human brain and the electronic computer.   If we adopt, therefore, the brain
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Posted: May 08, 2007 08:19 AM
Last Updated: Aug 05, 2011 12:54 PM