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Agency PageThe Anatomy of Counterintelligence
The Anatomy of Counterintelligence, A. C. Wasemiller. The first purpose of this study was to help the authorities in emerging or young nations in which a counterintelligence capability is lacking or deficient. Such countries are especially vulnerable in this era, when Soviet skills in espionage, counterespionage, and subversion have been refined for half a century...
Agency PageThe Anatomy of Counterintelligence
The Anatomy of Counterintelligence
Agency PageThe Case of the SS-6
The Case of the SS-6, M. C. Wonus. The public display of a Soviet SS-6 rocket at the Paris Air Show in 1967 jolted the US scientific astronautics intelligence community into awareness of many weaknesses in its evaluative processes. These revelations were of much greater intelligence significance than the factual information gleaned from inspection of the missile itself...
Agency PageDCI Hillenkoetter: Soft Sell and Stick
DCI Hillenkoetter: Soft Sell and Stick, Arthur B. Darling. The man to succeed General Vandenberg at the head of the President's information service had been under consideration for some time. Though often credited with the choice, Admiral Souers took no part in selecting Admiral Roscoe H. Hillenkoetter. Another personal representative of the President, Admiral Leahy, did...
Agency PageSpotting Photo Fakery
Spotting Photo Fakery, Dino A. Brugioni. When Soviet troops moved into Czechoslovakia in August 1968, television viewers in Poland were shown film apparently depicting the enthusiastic welcome the invaders received from the Czechoslovaks. The Polish audience was not told that it was in fact seeing a re-run of a film strip dating from 1945. This simple deception was an example of "photo fakery." Here we will look at other, somewhat more subtle photographic methods often employed. Although an expert job of fakery may defy detection even by another expert, there are some telltale signs anyone should look for...
Agency PageMichael Collins and Bloody Sunday
Michael Collins and Bloody Sunday, Martin C. Hartline and M.M. Kaulbach. Until Easter Week 1966, the statue of Lord Nelson stood peacefully on its column in Dublin Square. It was blown up on the eve of the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rebellion, which the British had finally subdued on that very spot. Although the figurative decapitation of the hero of Trafalgar made the front page of The New York Times, the event was but a footnote to history, recalling one of the most newsworthy stories of the early 1900's, The Irish Revolt...
Agency PageMichael Collins and Bloody Sunday
Michael Collins and Bloody Sunday
Agency PageSailor in a Russian Frame
Intelligence in Recent Public Literature: Sailor in a Russian Frame. R.H. Sheepshanks. "I'm not a Profumo, but ..." was the title on the illustrated handbill, with photos to match, which was sent to the British press and the wife and political friends and enemies of retired Royal Navy Commander Anthony Courtney, Conservative Member of Parliament for Harrow East, in August of 1965. Before a year had passed, Courtney had lost his wife, his seat, and most of his business as a result of a KGB political action operation in the heart of London. His book is the story of why the Soviets "framed" him and how he fought back, and almost won. The episode vividly exemplifies how the Soviets employ assiduous data collection and personal provocation in political action...
Agency PageThe Okhrana: The Russian Department of Police. A Bibliography by Edward Ellis Smith. Book review by Thomas G. Therkelsen
Okhrana - history 1881-1917, Thomas G. Therkelsen. The Russian imperial secret service, the Okhrana, is the only major security establishment of the twentieth century about which a comprehensive bibliography, including material from its own files and interrogations of its leaders, could possibly appear as an open publication. It went out of existence in 1917, when the provisional regime took over and the revolutionary mobs destroyed most of the centrally and provincially kept records. The Bolsheviks promptly established their own Cheka, but in no way as a continuation of the Okhrana. Instead of safeguarding the secrets of the predecessor agency, the Cheka of the Soviets publicized and exploited them to serve their purposes...