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Agency PageBeaumarchais and the American Revolution
Beaumarchais and the American Revolution, Streeter Bass. It was September, 1775, the King of England was George III, and the speaker of the bold words was John Wilkes, flamboyant pamphleteer, demagogue, radical Whig, rabble-rouser, libertarian, and, since the autumn of 1774, Lord Mayor of London. He was the center of a circle of the most vociferous of His Majesty's not-so-loyal Opposition and a lodestone for all those who hated the authoritarianism of George III. lie presided over a series of famous (or infamous, according to the point of view) "libertarian suppers" which were attended by radical British Whigs and equally radical Americans of strongly separatist persuasion. He gave vent to this opinion of his and his King's mutual esteem at one such supper and, on this particular occasion, one of his hearers was a Frenchman, Pierre August Caron de Beaumarchais, who the next day included it in an intelligence report he was sending to Versailles...
Agency PageBeaumarchais and the American Revolution
Beaumarchais and the American Revolution
Agency PageSoviet Deception in the Czechoslovak Crisis
Soviet Deception in the Czechoslovak Crisis, Cynthia M. Grabo. The various postmortems and retrospective analyses of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968 have revealed a considerable amount of disagreement among analysts concerning the deception measures taken by the Soviet Union during that summer. Some analysts believe that the USSR conducted a deliberate and fairly successful political and military deception campaign at least from mid-July onward (that is, from the start of major mobilization and deployment of the invasion forces), which was intended to conceal the scale and purpose of the military movements, and to deceive the Czechoslovaks and others into believing that there would not be an invasion. On the other hand, there are analysts who believe that the USSR did not engage in any significant deception effort, and that if we or the Czechoslovaks were misled at all it was a result of wishful thinking or self-deception. Aside from those relatively few specialists who have examined all the evidence in detail, most of us probably have a very inexact understanding of this question and why there should be a difference of opinion in retrospect...
Agency PageSoviet Deception in the Czechoslovak Crisis
Soviet Deception in the Czechoslovak Crisis
Agency PageThe Agency and the Future
The Agency and the Future, Charles D. Cremeans. The Central Intelligence Agency is twenty-two years old—old enough for Parkinson's law to have gone into operation and for its original missions to lose some of their crispness and relevance to the needs of the country and of its policy-makers...
Agency PageBook review of The Secret Road to World War Two: Soviet Versus Western Intelligence, 1921-1939 by Paul W. Blackstock
THE SECRET ROAD TO WORLD WAR TWO: SOVIET VERSUS WESTERN INTELLIGENCE, 1921-1939. By Paul W. Blackstock. This book has grave defects. For the most part they result from two of the author's characteristics. The first of these is that he is insufficiently grounded in intelligence, or insufficiently critical, to make discriminating judgments about his sources. The second is that he artificially equates the USSR and the democratic West in comparing their governments and their intelligence services...