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Agency PageThe Oxcart Story
The Oxcart Story, Thomas P. McIninch. One spring day in 1962 a test pilot named Louis Schalk, employed by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, took off from the Nevada desert in an aircraft the like of which had never been seen before. A casual observer would have been startled by the appearance of this vehicle; he would perhaps have noticed especially its extremely long, slim, shape, its two enormous jet engines, its long, sharp, projecting nose, and its swept-back wings which appeared far too short to support the fuselage in flight. He might well have realized that this was a revolutionary airplane; he could not have known that it would be able to fly at three times the speed of sound for more than 3,000 miles without refueling, or that toward the end of its flight, when fuel began to run low, it could cruise at over 90,000 feet. Still less would he have known of the equipment it was to carry, or of the formidable problems attending its design and construction...
Agency PageSomewhere in Siberia
Somewhere in Siberia, Henry S. Lowenhaupt. At the halfway point in the September 1958 Second Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy at Geneva, Switzerland, the Russians announced that they had just put into operation an atomic power station "somewhere in Siberia." We were able to start collecting information on it immediately, for we had laid extensive plans for the intelligence exploitation of this conference. Nevertheless, enthusiastic though we were, I doubt that any of us expected this information to be, as it indeed became, the key to understanding Russian facilities for the production of plutonium for nuclear weapons...
Agency PageWhat Size is It?
What Size is It? Ralph S. Pearse. Man has been interested in the size of things since earliest time. The need for his knowing the size of objects has changed with the evolution of man himself. Primitive man, for instance, needed to know if a tree was tall enough, when felled, to use as a bridge across a stream. As time passed, he needed to know the height of an enemy fortress wall in order to build ladders long enough to scale the wall. Today, the intelligence analyst's need for measurements is of a drastically different nature. Even more significant is the high degree of precision now required...
Agency PageThe Good Old Days
The Good Old Days, Walter H. Gioumau. In the recent past the writer was involved in a problem which was difficult to solve because it clearly did not fall within existing CIA regulations and, therefore, was subject to various interpretations. While exploring means to achieve a solution through the uncharted channels and shoals of shifting bureaucracy, and exercising a branch chief's prerogatives, the writer was told that his solution, while acceptable, was not technically (bureaucratically) correct. After full responsibility was willingly assumed, the writer was told, "OK, you are on your own." Subsequent developments are not important; however, after hearing that he was "on his own," the writer paused to reflect upon the last time he had heard these words during his CIA career. It was in October 1951, and it happened as follows...
Agency PageBasic Psychology for Intelligence Analysts
Basic Psychology for Intelligence Analysts, Charles D. Cremeans. When Allen Dulles chose to have the words "For ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free," carved in white marble at the entrance to the Headquarters building he was giving expression to an article of faith in the intelligence profession. We must believe that knowledge of the truth sustains and supports our government or we couldn't justify what we are doing...
Agency PageA Note on KGB Style
A Note on KGB Style, Wayne Lambridge. The KGB like any enduring institution has a style, its own way of doing things. When we seek to understand the service and its officers, we should perhaps pay attention to how they do business as well as to what kind of business they do. This article is intended to raise the subject for discussion, to present largely one man's opinion. It is far from a definitive study...