Library

 

html

Agency PageWhat is a Generalist?
What is a Generalist?, Gordon M. Stewart. The word generalist as it is used by intelligence people has no fixed and useful meaning. It suggests a number of ideas which, for the most part, have been imported from other walks of life: from the military services we derive the concept of the general staff officer; from medicine, the general practitioner; from business, the manager; and from the world of scholarship, the synthesizer. And it must be admitted that an element of bias creeps into any discussion of generalists in intelligence. Most of us tend to line up for or against them. The result of this is that people beginning a career in intelligence have a hard time deciding upon long-range goals. They fear that the old hands will reject them if they try to become generalists and that they will run the risk of being tucked away and forgotten if they specialize. These fears, it will be seen, are largely the result of misunderstanding ...
Agency PageToward a Federal Intelligence Memory
Toward a Federal Intelligence Memory, George W. Wright. The problem of storing an ever mounting accumulation of raw intelligence information and maintaining ready access to assorted needles in this haystack is one of the most baffling in the whole field of intelligence management. It is particularly difficult in CIA, where it is necessary to provide community-wide reference services and where no categories of data are excluded from the collection. The problem has been attacked manfully and partial solutions have been achieved; but these solutions have not kept pace with the growing mountain of documents and the sharpened requirements of intelligence analysts. CIA analysts still fall more or less frustrated between the impossibility of keeping adequate personal files and the deficiencies of the central reference service ...
Agency PageDevelopments in Air Targeting: The Damage Assessment Model
Developments in Air Targeting: The Damage Assessment Model, Davis B. McCarn. The primary mission of air targeting is the identification of opportunities for air action. The identification of these opportunities requires an exhaustive study of many aspects of the structure of potential enemy nations. Each of the important resources of these nations must be evaluated, measured, and, if possible, associated with specific geographic locations. The contributions of these resources to the strengths of the enemy must be evaluated. The motivations and national objectives of the enemy must, in turn, be studied to determine the probable threats posed by his available strengths. Having defined the threats posed, it is then possible to return to the resources which were critical to the strengths underlying these threats and assess their vulnerability to air attack. Through the assessment of the vulnerability of many combinations of resources, opportunities for optimum air action can be identified. This analytic process, proceeding from the enemy's resources and strengths to the threats he poses and from his vulnerabilities to the opportunities they provide for air action, is what air targeting calls "comprehensive analysis." ...
Agency PageNew Anachronism
New Anachronism, Ralph Riposte. There can be no quarrel with the charge in the foregoing article that Americans generally, and some intelligence personnel as well, tend to transport their homes abroad along with their baggage, consort with other Americans to the near exclusion of foreigners, attend Hollywood films in Bond Bros. suits, etc. Nor can there be any doubt that the insularity of some intelligence officers creates grave disadvantages. Mr. Tidwell's proposals, however, carry within them problems quite as grave as those he seeks to solve ...
Agency PageThe Exploitation of Russian Scientific Literature for Intelligence Purposes
The Exploitation of Russian Scientific Literature for Intelligence Purposes, J. J. Bagnall. Russian scientific literature has been an object of the intelligence community's attention for the past ten years and more. Even before the end of World War II, US intelligence had assigned some priority to the examination of Soviet documents. Army intelligence had established its Special Documents Section to collect information on the USSR from captured documents in both the Russian and German languages. Although not abundant in these sources, a good deal of information on Soviet military technical developments was ferreted out. The Washington Document Center, jointly operated by the Army and Navy, similarly searched captured Japanese documents for Russian scientific and technical developments ...
Agency PageThe Interrogation of Suspects Under Arrest
The Interrogation of Suspects Under Arrest, Don Compos. Your virtuous interrogator, like the virtuoso in any field, will tell you that formulating the principles of his art would be a presumptuous and sterile procedure. Interrogators are born, not made, he almost says, and good interrogation is the organic product of intuition, experience, and native skill, not reducible to a set of mechanical components. Yet the organic whole can usefully be dissected, and examination will reveal its structural principles ...
Agency PageThe Intelligence Hand in East-West Exchange Visits
The Intelligence Hand in East-West Exchange Visits, Guy E. Coriden. Exchange visits with the Soviet Bloc have now become a prominent feature of East-West relationships. Such visits have been lauded by both Eastern and Western statesmen as an ideal method for bringing the peoples into contact and thereby lessening world tensions. Scientists have said that the free interchange which is provided by direct contact is essential if man is to make maximum progress in his battle to conquer nature and the elements. Men of good will have reiterated the necessity for peoples of the world to know each other and to share the gifts they possess with those who are in need of them. Last, and maybe least from any point of view except that of this community, exchanges have been considered as vehicles for the collection of foreign positive intelligence ...
Agency PageA Note on Casual Intelligence Acquisition
A Note on Casual Intelligence Acquisition, Amerikanskiy Turist. "Your pass, please," crisply asked the guard. "Oh, the Devil! I left it home." With a gesture of annoyance tempered by indifference, the guard motioned me into the Frunze Soviet Army Club in Moscow. And so I wandered around and cased the place. The auditorium was ultramodern, well equipped for several hundred guests. The luxury of the surroundings for the senior and field-grade officer class which frequents this elite officers' club was evident in the mosaic murals and paintings depicting in warm colors the past battles of the Red Army. No secrets lying about-but a laxity on the part of the guard reflecting his assumption that, after all, no unauthorized Soviet citizen would try to get in ...
Agency PageA Cable from Napoleon
A Cable from Napoleon, Edwin C. Fishel. The years 1864-67 saw the United States facing one of the severest international problems in its history: an Austrian prince ruled Mexico and a French army occupied the south bank of the Rio Grande. It was toward the end of this period that the Atlantic cable went into permanent operation. Thus the United States had both the motive and the means for what was almost certainly its first essay in peacetime communications intelligence ...
Agency PageMilitary Intelligence Behind Enemy Lines
Military Intelligence Behind Enemy Lines, Stefan Borowy. The history of intelligence activities during World War II includes many chapters on adventures and accomplishments in the German-occupied countries, but nothing to equal in scale and in organization the systematic intelligence collection effort carried out in Poland under the direction of the Home Army's Intelligence Division. Before describing this effort let us recall the circumstances in which Poland then found herself and the conditions under which the intelligence service was organized ...
Agency PageA Neglected Source of Evidence
A Neglected Source of Evidence, Myron Rush. The profound changes which have occurred in the Soviet Union in the five years since Stalin's death have been accompanied by many surprising events. It is useful to consider certain means by which Western observers might have reduced the element of surprise ...