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Gulf War operations in Tel Aviv,

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Gulf War operations in Tel Aviv,
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Tel Aviv
monitors, wearing earphones, could seldom distinguish the sounds on TV from the real thing, and several times one monitor or another would come out of the room yelling, "The sirens! I hear the sirens!" One teletype operator announced that he had heard a missile strike one night in the sealed room. What he really had heard was me accidentally hitting my head on the wall and making a great thumping sound. The apartment of one of our monitors was damaged by a blast while she was there, but she was unhurt. Debris from a Scud fell on the home of another monitor, but it did not cause any damage. It was close, but we were lucky.
At work, I could be calm. At home, I hid behind my couch. This was more than just cowardice. Most injuries were caused by flying glass, and the couch was a protection against that.
Scary Situations After six weeks and 39 Scuds, President Bush declared victory, and the missiles stopped coming. The bureau stepped down from 24-hour coverage, schools reopened, and cars ventured onto the streets. But it was a while before things returned to normal. People kept their gas masks with them even after the IDF said they no longer were needed. Any thud at any time sounded like a missile. After a few more weeks, however, most people calmed down. But I still jump at the sound of sirens or any booms anytime, anywhere.
When we heard the missiles strike, I was afraid. The Patriots were worse than the Scuds, because they were louder and always sounded like they were flying directly over my apartment. Everyone hearing a Patriot apparently thought it was flying just over his house, but the Patriots were so loud they just sounded that close. One bank began advertising "We are all Patriots."
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Posted: May 08, 2007 08:48 AM
Last Updated: Aug 04, 2011 08:33 AM