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as DCI, 1991-1993, remarks on intelligence and the Cold War,

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as DCI, 1991-1993, remarks on intelligence and the Cold War,
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alert, and what they were doing. This played a critical role in preventing a mistake or miscalculation that could have incinerated the world. By the same token, US intelligence provided nearly all of the information that made arms control agreements and associated lessening of tensions possible, from the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1993 to START II this year. had the conviction, the faith that communism was doomed. In his farewell address on January 15, 1953, President Truman said:
"As the free world grows stronger, more united, more attractive to men on both sides of the Iron Curtain-and as the Soviet hopes for easy expansion are blocked-then there will have to come a time of change in the Soviet world. Nobody can say for sure when that is going to be, or exactly how it will come about, whether by revolution, or trouble in the satellites, or by a change inside the Kremlin. Whether the communist rulers shift their policies of their own free will-or whether change comes about in some other way--I have not a doubt in the world that a change will occur. I have a deep and abiding faith in the destiny of free men. With patience and courage, we shall someday move into a new era."
During the long decades of the Cold War, one of the reasons that "containment" worked was that while military forces trained and exercised and glowered at one another, US intelligence was in the trenches and at war-from Italy and France out of World War II to Afghanistan in the 1980s. Containment worked not just because the Soviet system was fundamentally flawed, but also because Soviet aggression and subversion were resisted-and that resistance was usually organized or supported by American intelligence.
Though the Cold War is over, and the threat from communism has all but evaporated, American intelligence still has-and must maintain-a global view. In earlier years, we were concerned that underdevelopment and unstable countries would be susceptible to communist influence. Today, many of these same countries are still unstable, threatened by fanatics, or facing humanitarian crises that not only endanger their sovereignty, but also challenge regional stability. Thirty-six years later, the wall came down, and we are moving into the new era President Truman believed would come.
Our work is not over. There are other walls to tear down-the wall built by tyrants who would deny others their freedom, the wall that imprisons those addicted to illegal drugs, the wall of fear created by the terrorist and the wall of defiance, built by those who seek weapons of mass destruction.
So, in many ways, this monument represents a tremendous success-and a tremendous challenge. These are the walls that the democracies now seek to tear down. And with strong intelligence, and effective cooperation at home and abroad, these walls too will come down.
We must remember that those who conceived America's policies to contain Soviet communism, and those from CIA who helped implement them,
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Posted: May 08, 2007 08:53 AM
Last Updated: Aug 03, 2011 02:12 PM