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Agency PageThe Calculation of Soviet Helicopter Performance
The Calculation of Soviet Helicopter Performance, Theodore A. George. The chariness of the Soviets in disclosing facts about their military establishment and the technical characteristics of their equipment extends even to items not used primarily for military purposes. Despite stringent security, however, they are not able to continue concealing a new item once it is in series production and has been issued in quantity to field units. Recognizing this fact, they finally relax to the extent of demonstrating new equipment they have in service at such public affairs as the May Day Parade, attended by all foreign military attaches stationed in Moscow. Or alternatively, a picture of a new item may appear in a Soviet military journal over some such caption as "Another Great Proletarian Achievement" or "The Highest Performance in the World." ...
Agency PageIntelligence as Foundation for Policy
Intelligence as Foundation for Policy, Robert Cutler. An integral and in fact basic element in the formation of national security policy is the latest and best intelligence bearing on the substance of the policy to be determined. That statement is not a theoretical truism, but a description of what has by and large actually been practiced in the Executive Branch under the administration of President Eisenhower. It is based on first-hand observation: for periods totaling almost four years I was in continuous touch with the procedures for formulating, adopting, and coordinating the execution of national security policies within the Executive Branch. I assisted the President at 179 meetings of the National Security Council-almost half of all the meetings it held in the first dozen years of its existence. I presided at 504 meetings of the Council's Planning Board (earlier called its Senior Staff). I was a member and for a while Vice Chairman of its Operations Coordinating Board; I participated in meetings of the Council on Foreign Economic Policy; I represented the President on a small group which considered special operations. It is from this experience that the conclusions of this article are drawn ...
Agency PageThe Lost Keys to El Alamein
The Lost Keys to El Alamein, Wilhelm F. Flicke. How slight and unimpressive are often the initial causes which lead to great changes in the course of events; how our picture of great men varies according to what we know about them and the point of view from which we regard them; how easily the fame of great generals grows pale when we know the secret of their successes! ...
Agency PageTerrain Intelligence for the Pentomic Army
Terrain Intelligence for the Pentomic Army, Clifton A. Blackburn, Jr.. Over the Mulde River, behind the Iron Curtain in East Germany, there is a highway bridge. This bridge has a load classification of 50 tons. The national highway it carries has a concrete surface 26 feet wide. The approaches to the bridge are unusually steep (11% grade) and the roadway across it is unusually narrow (12 feet). The bridge has 3 spans and 2 piers. The piers are made of stone and contain demolition chambers. The spans are approximately 62 feet long, and the center span clears the surface of the water by 16 feet at normal high water, which occurs in May ...
Agency PageThe Alamo Scouts
The Alamo Scouts, Eustace E. Nabbie. Colonel Allison Ind's recent book, Allied Intelligence Bureau, which described a number of the unorthodox reconnaissance and raider activities carried out in the World War II South West Pacific Area, failed to mention a small intrepid group of men called "Alamo Scouts" who performed for the U.S. Sixth Army services similar to those rendered by OSS detachments in other overseas commands. It is the purpose of this article to bridge a gap thus left in the intelligence history of that Area and time...