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Postwar Soviet Espionage - a Bibliography

 
 

APPROVED FOR RELEASE
CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM
22 SEPT 93

 

POSTWAR SOVIET ESPIONAGE
A Bibliography

 

This is a selective bibliography of publications that describe the activities of the Soviet intelligence services since the end of World War II. Some works of broader scope, covering also wartime and prewar operations, have been listed because of the postwar material they contain. Serious studies and official materials have been given preference over sensationalized or undocumented accounts intended for popular consumption.

 

CONTENTS BY COUNTRY OF OPERATION

 

                       General                                            Great Britain                  
Australia Japan
Austria Poland
Burma Sweeden
Canada Yugoslavia
Denmark United States
Germany, West Index of Cases

 

 

GENERAL


1. COOKRIDGE, E. H.
The Net That Covers the World.
New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1955.

A general review of Soviet intelligence activities, including references to the known cases of many Soviet agents in Europe and the western hemisphere.

2. DALLIN, David J. Soviet Espionage.
New Haven: Yale University Press, 1955.

A comprehensive study of the Soviet intelligence service from the late 1920's on. In addition to Soviet wartime espionage, the nets in Switzerland and the Rote Kapelle in Germany, it treats the Canadian spy case and Soviet postwar espionage in Europe and the United States, giving an account of Soviet agents in the U.S. Government and of atomic espionage.

3. DE PONCINS, Léon
Espions Soviétiques dans le Monde.
Paris: Nouvelles Editions Latines, 1961.

An account of several important Soviet espionage cases, including the Canadian atom spies, Alger Hiss, Fuchs, the Rosenbergs, Burgess and Maclean, Pontecorvo, and Sorge, and of Communist espionage in France.

4. DERIABIN, Peter, and Frank Gibney
The Secret World.
Garden City: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1959.

This autobiography is chiefly concerned with Deriabin's work in Soviet intelligence, both at its Moscow headquarters and in Vienna. It describes the Soviet intelligence organization and its espionage and terrorist operations. Deriabin defected in 1954. See also his testimony before the Internal Security Subcommittee of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary: Communist Controls on Religious Activity, May 5, 1959; and his testimony before the House Committee on Un-American Activities: The Kremlin's Espionage and Terror Organizations, March 17, 1959.

5. MENNEVEE, Roger
Les Services Secrets Soviétiques: Evolution et Méthodes d'Action (1917-1957).
Paris: Les Documents Politiques, Diplomatiques et Financiers, 1957.

This volume is a compilation from the monthly issues of Les Documents Politiques, Diplomatiques et Financiers, which chronicles disclosures of Soviet espionage activities throughout the world. Later cases are covered in several subsequent issues of the monthly.

6. NOEL-BAKER, Francis
The Spy Web: A Study of Communist Espionage.
London: The Batchworth Press, 1954.

These studies include several Soviet espionage cases--the wartime Sorge case in Japan, the Canadian affair, the Vavoudes group in Greece, and the Andersson case in Sweden.

7. SMITH, Colonel Truman
The Infamous Record of Soviet Espionage.
In: Reader's Digest, 77: 36-42, August 1960.

This article gives a short account of several cases of Soviet espionage and other intelligence activity in various parts of the world. Col. Smith has had a long career in U.S. military intelligence service, and his material here is authoritative.

8. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Communist Forgeries. Hearing Before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-seventh Congress, First Session. June 2, 1961 .
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1961 .

Testimony of Richard Helms, Assistant Director, Central Intelligence Agency, concerning the preparation by the Soviet and other Communist intelligence services of fabricated intelligence reports, forgeries, distortions of genuine documents, and false news articles for intelligence and propaganda purposes.

9. WHITE, John Baker
Pattern for Conquest.
London: Robert Hale Limited, 1956.

A survey of several kinds of non-military warfare carried on by Soviet agents and other Communist instrumentalities since 1945: espionage, subversion, coups d'état, and the infiltration of foreign governments and organizations.

10. WOLIN, Simon, and Robert M. Slusser, editors
The Soviet Secret Police.
New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1957.

Although this book is primarily a study of the Soviet secret police from its Chekist origins in 1917 to the death of Stalin, it includes a section on postwar Soviet espionage activities in Western Europe.

AUSTRALIA
Vladimir Petrov was the chief MVD officer in the Soviet Embassy in Australia; his wife, Evdokia, also served in the Embassy as an MVD cipher clerk. Petrov's intelligence work included the recruitment of agent personnel and the organization of intelligence networks. When the Petrovs defected in April 1954, a Royal Commission on Espionage was established to hear testimony from them and others on the activities of Soviet espionage in Australia. The first two entries below report its findings.

11. AUSTRALIA, COMMONWEALTH OF. ROYAL COMMISSION ON ESPIONAGE
Official Transcript of Proceedings taken at Sydney (Canberra and Melbourne).
Sydney: Commonwealth of Australia, 1954-55.

12. AUSTRALIA, COMMONWEALTH OF. ROYAL COMMISSION ON ESPIONAGE
Report of the Royal Commission on Espionage, 22nd August 1955.
Sydney: Commonwealth of Australia, 1955.

This includes the Commission's Interim Report of October 21, 1954.

13. BIALOGUSKI, Michael
The Case of Colonel Petrov.
New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1955.

The story of the Petrov case as told by Dr. Bialoguski, who assisted in the defection. At points he overplays his own role in the affair.

14. PETROV, Vladimir and Evdokia
Empire of Fear.
New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1956.

The Petrovs' own story of their intelligence activities in Australia on behalf of the USSR.

 

AUSTRIA

 

15. ANDERSON, Jack and Fred Blumenthal
Trapped at the Washington Monument.
In: Parade, pp. 6-8, January 6, 1957.

This article is the only consolidated public version of the story of two naturalized Americans who became Soviet intelligence agents in Vienna, Kurt Ponger and Otto Verber. Also involved was Yuri Novikov, Second Secretary of the Soviet Embassy in Washington. As a result of their espionage activities, Novikov was declared persona non grata in 1953, Verber was sentenced to 10 years in prison for conspiring to communicate and transmit information to a foreign country, and Ponger was given 15 years for espionage.

 

BURMA

 

16. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Soviet Intelligence in Asia. Hearing before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-Sixth Congress, First Session. December 14, 1959.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1959.

Testimony of Aleksandr Yurievich Kaznacheyev, who was a member of the staff of the Soviet Embassy in Burma. In addition to his regular duties, and without the knowledge of his Foreign Office colleagues, Kaznacheyev was coopted by the Soviet intelligence service to perform covert intelligence operations in Burma. His testimony describes Soviet intelligence activities in Burma and several other countries in Asia. See also his further testimony before the same Subcommittee on January 22, 1960, entitled Conditions in the Soviet Union.

CANADA
Igor Gouzenko was a cipher clerk on the staff of the Military Attaché in the Soviet Embassy in Ottawa, Canada. In September 1945 he defected to the Canadian authorities. A Royal Commission established to hear testimony from him and others on Soviet espionage activities in Canada issued the report listed below as item 18. As a result of Gouzenko's defection, 20 persons, including a member of the Canadian Parliament and employees of the Canadian Government, were tried for supplying information to a foreign power during the war and in the immediate postwar period.

17. ATHOLL, Justin
How Stalin Knows: The Story of the Great Atomic Spy Conspiracy.
London: Distributed by News of the World, 1951.
An account of Soviet atomic espionage, in particular of the Canadian case and those of Dr. Fuchs and the Rosenbergs.

18. CANADA. THE ROYAL COMMISSION
The Report of the Royal Commission appointed under Order in Council P.C. 411 of February 5, 1946, to investigate the facts relating to and the circumstances surrounding the communication, by public officials and other persons in positions of trust, of secret and confidential information to agents of a foreign power. June 27, 1946.
Ottawa: Edmond Cloutier, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, 1946.

Contains also: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Interim Reports, March 1946.

19. GOUZENKO, Igor
The Iron Curtain.
New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., 1948.

Gouzenko's own story of Soviet inteiligence activities in Canada.

20. Gouzenko Talks: Interview with the man who exposed the Soviet spy ring in Canada.
In: U.S. News & World Report, 36: 34--15, January 1, 1954.

21. NEWMAN, Bernard
Soviet Atomic Spies.
London: Robert Hale Limited, 1952.

A review of Soviet atomic espionage, including the Canadian case and those of Dr. Klaus Fuchs and the Rosenbergs.

22. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Testimony of Former Russian Code Clerk Relating to the Internal Security of the United States;
Questioning on January 4, 1954, in Ottawa, Canada, of Igor Gouzenko, former Code Clerk in the Soviet Embassy at Ottawa. . . .
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1955.

23. WHITE, John Baker
The Soviet Spy System.
London: The Falcon Press, Ltd., 1948.

An account of Soviet intelligence activities in Canada based on the facts brought out before the Royal Commission.

 

DENMARK

 

24. U.S. JOINT PUBLICATIONS RESEARCH SERVICE
Press Articles on Recent Danish Espionage Case.
New York: U.S. Joint Publications Research Service, April 25, 1960. JPRS 3145.

This pamphlet is a translation of various Danish newspaper articles in November and December, 1959, concerning seven Danes indicted in Denmark for peace-time espionage on behalf of "a foreign intelligence service seeking information primarily of a military nature," particularly concerning NATO installations in Denmark. All the defendants were found guilty.

 

GERMANY

 

25. KHOKHLOV, Nikolai Yevgen'yevich
In the Name of Conscience.
New York: David McKay Company, Inc., 1959.

First published with title: Pravo na Sovest'. Frankfurt am Main: Possev Verlag, 1957.
Khokhlov was an MVD staff officer sent from Moscow in January 1954 to assassinate Georgi Okolovich, an official of the NTS, an anti-Soviet Russian émigré organization. Khokhlov apprised Okolovich of his mission and defected in February 1954. This book describes his activities as a Soviet intelligence officer.

26. MVD-MGB Campaign Against Russian Emigrés.
Frankfurt am Main: Possev Publishing House, 1957.

A description of Soviet State Security activities against émigré groups abroad. Specific cases illustrate the Soviet use of agents and informers, agents provocateurs. kidnapping, and assassination as instruments to eliminate anti-Soviet émigrés and cripple their organizations.

27. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Activities of Soviet Secret Service. Hearing before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-Third Congress, Second Session: May 21, 1954.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1954.

Testimony of Nikolai Yevgen'yevich Khokhlov, former MGB agent.

 

GREAT BRITAIN

 

28. BLAKE, George (Case of)
Press articles.

George Blake was a Soviet agent for several years, furnishing the Soviets with secret information while serving in the British intelligence service. He was convicted in 1961 for violation of the Official Secrets Act. Material about this case appeared in the press, both in England and abroad, particularly on May 4, 1961, and immediately thereafter, but also from mid-April on.

29. BULLOCK, John and Henry Miller
Spy Ring: The Full Story of the Naval Secrets Case.
London: Secker & Warburg, 1961.

An account of the Soviet espionage net in England headed by Gordon Lonsdale. See item 33 below.

30. CLARKE, Comer
The War Within.
London: World Distributors, 1961.

Another account of the Soviet espionage net headed by Gordon Lonsdale.

31. MOOREHEAD, Alan
Traitor Klaus Fuchs: He Gave Stalin the A-Bomb.
In: Saturday Evening Post, 224:22-23+, May 24, 1952; 32-33+, May 31, 1952; 36-37+, June 7, 1952; 34+, June 14, 1952.

These articles describe the espionage activities of the naturalized British scientist Dr. Klaus Fuchs on behalf of the Soviet intelligence service. Commencing during the war years, Dr. Fuchs transmitted secret details about the atomic bomb to the Soviets. He was arrested and convicted in London in 1950.

32. MOOREHEAD, Alan
TheTraitors.
New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1952.

This book deals briefly with the Canadian spy case and in considerable detail with the atomic espionage activities of Dr. Klaus Fuchs.

33. PORTLAND NAVAL SECRETS CASE
Press articles.

The case of Soviet espionage in Britain involving Gordon Lonsdale and his accomplices Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kroger, Henry Houghton. and Ethel Elizabeth Gee. These were all indicted and convicted in 1961 under the Official Secrets Act for espionage against the Admiralty's Underwater Weapons Establishment at Portland. Long extracts of the pertinent testimony appear in the London Daily Telegraph and Times for 8-10 February 1961 (preliminary hearing in Magistrate's Court) and 13-23 March 1961 (trial in Central Criminal Court). Other accounts and feature stories appear elsewhere in the British press for this period.

34. WEST, Rebecca, pseudonym
A Train of Powder. London: Macmillan & Co., 1955.

In the section of this book entitled The Better Mousetrap (pp. 271-332), Miss West describes the case of William M. Marshall, a code clerk in the British Foreign Office who was convicted in 1952 of communicating secret information to Pavel Kuznetsov, Second Secretary of the Soviet Embassy in London. This account was originally serialized in The New Yorker under the title Annals of Treason, February 14, 21, and 28, 1953.

 

JAPAN

 

35. KOKOKU DOSHIKAI (Homeland Comrade Society), Tokyo Soren-chukyo No Tainichi
Kosei: Akama Ni Odoru Kakukai No Yokyoha Gunsho.
(Soviet and Chinese Communist Aggression Toward Japan: The Red Activities Among the Masses).
Tokyo: Seikei Shiryo Tsushinsha, 1959.

Sections of this book outline the nature of Soviet espionage activities in Japan and make some reference to specific cases. Soviet attempts to penetrate the Royal Household and government agencies are also described. The remainder of the book deals with Soviet political action, including economic, cultural, and propaganda activities and work with front organizations.

36. RASTVOROV, Yuri Aleksandrovich
How Red Titans Fought for Supreme Power.
In: Life, 37: 18-21+, November 29. 1954.
Red Fraud and Intrigue in the Far East.
In: Life, 37: 174-176+, December 6, 1954.
Goodby to Red Terror.
In: Life, 37: 49-50+, December 13, 1954.

Rastvorov, a member of the Soviet intelligence service for over a decade, was in Tokyo at the time of his defection in 1954 under the cover of Second Secretary of the Soviet mission there. These articles discuss not only Soviet espionage in Japan but Soviet intelligence activities over all.

37. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Scope of Soviet Activity in the United States. Hearing before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and other Internal Security Laws . . . Eighty-fourth Congress, Second Session. February 8, 1956. Part I.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1956.

Testimony of Yuri Rastvorov. This testimony, dealing in part with the question of Soviet agents in the United States, has more detailed information on Soviet intelligence activities in Japan, where Rastvorov was stationed.

38. WALKER, Gordon
Russia's Busiest Spy Nest.
In: Collier's 126: 18-19+, December 2, 1950.
Soviet espionage activity and personalities in Tokyo.

 

POLAND

 

39. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Soviet Espionage Through Poland. Hearing before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-Sixth Congress, .
Second Session. June 13, 1960.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1960.

Testimony of Colonel Pawel Monat, for nine years a member of the Polish military intelligence service and at one time Polish Military Attaché in Washington. His testimony describes the direct and indirect controls exercised by Soviet intelligence over the Polish services, including the assignment of Soviet intelligence officers to key positions therein. The testimony also discloses that copies of all Polish military intelligence reports are sent to the Soviet military intelligence service and that many of these reports are the result of intelligence collection requirements levied by the Soviets on the Polish service.

 

SWEDEN

 

40. FALKENSTAM, Curt
Röd Spion: En Skildring av den Farligaste Spionaffär Som Avslöjats i Vårt Land.
Stockholm: Aktiebolaget Epege, 1951.

This is the only full-length published account of the apprehension and trial of Ernst Hilding Andersson, a non-commissioned officer in the Swedish Navy, who for two years collected naval defense information for Soviet intelligence representatives in Stockholm. He was convicted of espionage in 1951.

 

YUGOSLAVIA

 

41. YUGOSLAVIA. MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
White Book on Aggressive Activities by the Governments of the U.S.S.R., Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Rumania, Bulgaria and Albania towards Yugoslavia.
Beograd: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia, 1951.

Contains documentary evidence and testimony on the espionage activities of Soviet agents in Yugoslavia, with Soviet diplomatic officers frequently involved.

 

UNITED STATES

 

42. Abel mit der Antenne.
In: Der Stern, 10 no. 43: 9-10, 63-73, October 26, 1957.

A general presentation of the case of Colonel Rudolf Abel. See item 45 below.

43. BUSCH, Francis Xavier
Enemies of the State: An Account of the Trials of the Mary Eugenia Surratt Case, the Teapot Dome Cases, the Alphonse Capone Case, the Rosenberg Case.
London: Arco Publications Limited, 1957.

This book contains a short and readable summary of the case of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and Morton Sobell, who were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage on behalf of the USSR by passing documents and information regarding the atomic bomb and other defense secrets. The Rosenbergs were executed in 1953 and Sobell was imprisoned.

44. DAVIDSON, Bill
The Secret: The People Who Stole It From Us.
In: Look, Vol. 21, No. 22: 87-105, October 29, 1957.

A review of the Rosenberg case based largely on U.S. Department of Justice records.

45. GIBNEY, Frank
Intimate Portrait of a Russian Master Spy (Colonel Rudolf Abel).
In: Life, 43: 122-130, November 11, 1957,

This article sets forth the facts in the case of the Soviet spy Colonel Rudolf Abel, largely as developed at his trial. Colonel Abel was convicted in 1957 for conspiring for almost 10 years to obtain and transmit to the USSR information relating to the national defense of the United States.

46. HOOVER, John Edgar
The Case of the Faceless Spy (Colonel Rudolf Abel).
In: This Week Magazine, pp. 9, 11-13, 22-23, October 23, 1960.

The FBI chief's account of the activities and apprehension of Colonel Abel.

47. MORROS, Boris
My Ten Years As A Counterspy.
New York: The Viking Press, 1959.

The author relates his experiences first as an agent of Soviet intelligence and then for 10 years as a double agent for the FBI. In the latter capacity he worked with an espionage net which included Jacob Albam, Jack and Myra Soble, Albert and Martha Dodd Stern, and Jane and George Zlatovski, all of whom were indicted for espionage. Albam and the Sobles pleaded guilty in 1957, the Sterns fled the country, and the Zlatovskis remained abroad.

48. PILAT, Oliver
The Atom Spies
New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1952.

This book describes the activities of Harry Gold, the Rosenbergs, David Greenglass, Dr. Fuchs, and others involved in atomic espionage for the Soviet Union in the United States.

49. U.S. CONGRESS. HOUSE. COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES
Chronicle of Treason: Reprint of Series of Articles by Representative Francis E. Walter, Appearing in the Philadelphia Inquirer, March 3-9, 1958. Eighty-Fifth Congress, Second Session. Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1958.

These articles by the Chairman of the House Committee on Un-American Activities describe Harry Gold's atomic espionage, his relations with Dr. Fuchs, the activities of the Rosenbergs, and the cases of Judith Coplon and Colonel Abel.

50. U.S. CONGRESS. HOUSE. COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES
Patterns of Communist Espionage. Report by the Committee on Un-American Activities, House of Representatives, Eighty-Fifth Congress, Second Session. January 1959.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1959.

This report notes certain Soviet espionage cases overseas and then summarizes several in the United States, including those of Jack Soble and his associates, of Colonel Abel, of Sgt. Rhodes, and of Mark Zborowski. It also describes Soviet attempts to recruit other persons in America as agents and lists Soviet diplomatic personnel involved in espionage in the United States.

51. U.S. CONGRESS. HOUSE. COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES
The Shameful Years: Thirty Years of Soviet Espionage in the United States. Report by the Committee on Un-Americar. Activities, U.S. House of Representatives, 1951.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1951.

This report covers the whole range of Soviet espionage activities in the United States up to 1951. In the postwar period it describes the Judith Coplon case and the atomic espionage cases.

52. U.S. CONGRESS. JOINT COMMITTEE ON ATOMIC ENERGY
Soviet Atomic Espionage.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1951.

This is a report on several cases of Soviet atomic espionage, including those of David Greenglass, Harry Gold, Dr. Fuchs, and Allan, Nunn May. The revelations of Gold and Greenglass are presented in question-and-answer form from their testimony in the Rosenberg case. Other cases of alleged Soviet atomic espionage are also discussed.

53. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Communist Passport Frauds. A Staff Study Prepared for the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-Fifth Congress, Second Session. July 11, 1958.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1958.

A study of the fraudulent procurement and use of U.S. passports by Communists and Soviet espionage agents.

54. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Exposé of Soviet Espionage--May 1960. Prepared by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Justice. Transmitted by Direction of the Attorney General for use of the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-Sixth Congress, Second Session.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1960.

A general statement of Soviet intelligence activities in the United States, with a description of many specific cases involving both Soviet agents and official Soviet representatives engaged in illegal intelligence activities in this country.

55. U.S. CONGRESS. SENATE. COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
Scope of Soviet Activity in the United States. Hearings before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws. Eighty-Fourth Congress, Second Session. February 29, 1956, Part 4; March 2, 1956, Part 5.
Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1956.

Testimony of Mark Zborowski, a former Soviet intelligence officer who came to the United States as a refugee in 1941. While admitting to earlier intelligence activities in France, particularly in infiltrating the Trotskyite movement, he denied having done espionage in the United States. In 1958 he was convicted of perjury in denying that he had known Jack Soble, who testified that he had met Zborowski many times and that Zborowski had given him information for transmission to the USSR.

 

INDEX OF CASES

 

Abel, Col. Rudolf. 42, 45, 46, 49, 50, 54. See also: Rhodes.
Albam. Jacob. See: Soble
Andersson, Ernst Hilding. 6, 9, 40.
Atomic espionage. See: Fuchs, Gold, Gouzenko, May, Rosenberg.
Australian spy case. See: Petrov.
Blake, George. 28.
Canadian spy case. See: Gouzenko, May.
Coplon, Judith. 2, 49, 51, 54.
Deriabin, Peter. 4.
Emigré groups. 26.
Forgeries, Communist. 8.
Fuchs, Dr. Klaus. 1, 2, 3, 17, 21, 31, 48, 49, 51, 52, 54. See also: Gold.
Gee, Ethel Elizabeth. 29, 30, 33.
Gold, Harry. 1, 2, 3, 5, 21, 44, 48, 49. 51, 52, 54.
Gouzenko, Igor. 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 32.
Greenglass, David. See: Rosenberg.
Houghton, Henry. 29, 30, 33.
Kaznacheyev, Aleksandr. 16.
Khokhlov, Nikolai. 1, 7, 9, 25, 26, 27.
Kroger, Mr. & Mrs. Peter. 29, 30, 33.
Lonsdale, Gordon A. 29, 30, 33.
Marshall, William. 1, 34.
May, Dr. Allan Nunn. 1, 2, 3, 6, 18, 19, 21, 23, 32, 52, 54.
Monat, Colonel Pawel. 39.
Morros, Boris. 7, 42. 47. See also: Soble, Stern.
Petrov, Vladimir and Evdokia. 1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14.
Ponger, Kurt. 1, 15, 54.
Rastvorov, Yuri. 36, 37.
Rhodes, M/Sgt. Roy. 7, 50. See also: Abel.
Rosenberg, Julius and Ethel. 1, 2, 3, 5, 17, 21, 43, 44, 48, 49, 51, 52, 54.
Sobell, Morton. See: Rosenberg.
Soble, Jack and Myra. 42, 47, 50, 54. See also: Morros, Stern, Zborowski. Stern, Alfred and Martha Dodd. 42, 47, 54. See also: Morros, Soble. Svendsen, Benny, et al. 7, 24.
Vavoudes, Nicholas, et al. 6.
Verber, Otto. 1, 15, 54.
Zborowski, Mark. 50, 54, 55. See also: Soble.
Zlatovski, George and Jane Foster. 47, 54. See also: Morros, Soble.
 

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