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Agency PageTonnage Through Tibet
Tonnage Through Tibet, by Philip Vetterling and Avis Waring. A more than routine interest has recently been focused on problems of highway logistics by the Communist Chinese threat along the northeastern border of India. The magnitude of this threat depends in large part on the Chinese ability to move military supplies by road from railheads deep in China to the areas of conflict; air transport, the only alternative, is at present not available to the Chinese in significant capacity...
Agency PageThe Theory and Practice of Soviet Intelligence
The Theory and Practice of Soviet Intelligence, Alexander Orlov. Like the Western intelligence services, the Russians get information about foreign states from two principal sources, from secret informants and undercover agents and from legitimate sources such as military and scientific journals, published reference material, and records of parliamentary debates. But the Russians regard as true intelligence (razvedka) only the first type of information, that procured by undercover agents and secret informants in defiance of the laws of the foreign country in which they operate. Information obtained from legitimate sources and publications they consider mere research data. In the eyes of Russian officers it takes a real man to do the creative and highly dangerous work of underground intelligence on foreign soil, while the digging up of research data in the safety of the home office or library can be left to women or young lieutenants just beginning their careers. The Western intelligence services, on the other hand, treat both types of information as intelligence, often with a much higher regard for research than for undercover work...
Agency PageCountersabotage--a Counterintelligence Function
Countersabotage--a Counterintelligence Function, Eric W. Timm. Counterintelligence in its most elementary form creates channels through which enemy agents must pass. Port security control, censorship, and interrogation camps for prisoners of war are such channels. These control channels, however, can be made effective only when the enemy's potential and our own situation have been analyzed and the balance struck between hostile forces and friendly facilities.
Agency PageMemoranda for the President: Sunrise
Memoranda for the President: Sunrise. Among the William J. Donovan papers are five volumes entitled OSS Reports to the White House containing carbons of memoranda predominantly transmitting or paraphrasing intelligence reports for the President's personal attention. They are characteristically introduced by a note to the President's secretary, Miss Grace Tully: "Dear Grace: Will you please hand the attached memorandum to the President? I believe it will be of interest to him."
Agency PageOperation Uproot
Operation Uproot, Frantisek Moravec. As Hitler's forces occupied one after another of the countries of Europe from 1939 through 1941, refugee officials from many of them assembled in London and formed governments in exile or liberation organs which tried among other things to organize intelligence activities. They were handicapped in this by having lost all the assets--agents, files, communications--of their pre-occupation intelligence organizations. They had to start from scratch, and with almost exclusively amateur staff personnel...
Agency PageCoastal Infiltration and Withdrawal
Lieutenant John A. Hurley's article, "A Technique for Coastal Infiltration," in the summer 1962 issue of this journal, suggested the application of the buoyant ascent escape technique to the debarking of agent personnel from a submarine submerged off the coast. He was apparently unaware that such an application has been made in practice, that in fact Marine Corps reconnaissance teams have been using the technique successfully in training exercises since 1958. These exercises were made public in the excellent CBS television presentation "The New Marine," shown on "Twentieth Century" in February 1961...
Agency PageThe Tenth Fleet by Ladislas Farago. Book review by Kenneth A. Knowles
Intelligence in Recent Public Literature. This is the best comprehensive account of U.S. antisubmarine operations in World War II that has come to this reviewer's attention, putting many aspects of them into print for the first time. It is based upon meticulous research into a wide range of source material, including U.S. Navy and captured German Admiralty documents and records, and just about everything that has been published on the subject.2 The main criticism that can be directed at the book arises from the author's dramatic compulsions, the most annoying of which is to portray the good guys as supermen and the bad guys as villains...