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Agency PageThe Intelligence of Literature
The Intelligence of Literature. By James V. Ogle. The controversy in the Soviet Union involving nonconformist writers like Ilya Ehrenburg and Yevgeniy Yevtushenko and reaching into the highest levels of party and government has dramatically illustrated for the Western public the close link between literature and politics in Soviet society. To one who has been watching for years a similar drama played on the small stage of Hungary, this is a gratifying development. When I became responsible for Hungarian political and cultural journals in 1958, it was with the conviction that the trends there which culminated in the 1956 revolt could not have stopped dead, that they must re-emerge in some form. This paper is an account of how the re-emergence was discovered and includes a description of the course taken by these trends as evidenced in the open literary sources ....
Agency PageThe Pitfall of a Latin Quirk
The Pitfall of a Latin Quirk. By M.E.O. Gravalos. A problem of interpretation recurs from time to time in current intelligence on Latin America. The set-piece situation is created by spot reports of statements from a Latin national "in a position to know" to the effect that events in his country have passed into a critical stage. Of unimpeachable authenticity and alarming content, these reports are immediately disseminated in raw form at the cabinet or presidential level. At the same time, fill-in and assessment are urgently demanded of the area specialist. The analyst whose expertise is primarily Latin American is thus brought into contact with the higher levels of current intelligence-men whose background tends to give them a particular familiarity with European and Sino-Soviet problems-and it is often extremely difficult for him to explain to them his grounds for recommending caution about accepting reports whose authenticity he does not question.
Agency PageCentralized Requirements in the DIA
Centralized Requirements in the DIA. by Lowell E. May. The Defense Intelligence Agency, organized in the fall of 1961, includes a Directorate for Acquisition which is responsible for functions relating to intelligence collection. With respect to community-wide programs this responsibility means representation on the four USIB committees devoted to collection problems (the CCPC, SIGINT, IPC, and COMDR), management of the Foreign Materiel Exploitation Program, and participation in interagency activities such as the Travel Folder Program and special collection projects. With respect to Department of Defense intelligence collection, it means a centralized processing of all requirements ...
Agency PageAgent Hazard in the Super-Het
Agent Hazard in the Super-Het. By M.J. Angelicchio. An agent is not likely to worry about counterintelligence direction-finders when he is merely listening to a blind transmission from his radio base. Yet most radio receivers radiate a measurable amount of radio-frequency energy, which can be detected at distances ranging from a fraction of an inch to many miles according to the design of the receiver and the sophistication of the detection apparatus. It is thus possible under the right circumstances to locate an agent receiver through an extension of the techniques long used in the locating of transmitters. The seriousness of this hazard varies so greatly with circumstance that no general rules can be made to deal with it, but it should be taken into account as one of the many considerations in an agent's security. An understanding of the phenomenon and some broad parameters will help one to assess the danger in a particular case ...
Agency PageA Name for Your Number
A Name for Your Number. By Thomas W. Marcquenski. For a variety of operational purposes it is useful to have a "reversed" city telephone directory, that is one in which you can look up a telephone number or street address and get the name of the subscriber. It was once possible, for example, by identifying the subscribers to which a certain telephone number was assigned in the Moscow directory, to assemble a list of officials and offices concerned with the Soviet nuclear energy program. The production of such reversed listings is the subject of this paper ...
Agency PageStudy in Indications Methodology
Study in Indications Methodology. Communications to the Editors.
Agency PageGeographic Intelligence
Geographic Intelligence. The examination of any single functional sector of the intelligence spectrum requires at the outset a choice between looking at it in isolation and emphasizing its relationships with the other sectors. The restrictive approach gives a picture so incomplete as to be misleading; the broad one may obscure the focal point. This discussion of the geographic sector will try to avoid the two extremes but will favor the larger picture where this seems desirable. The term "geographic intelligence" will refer interchangeably to the process or its product. These will be treated functionally, in abstraction from administrative organization, but with the entirety of the scattered U.S. apparatus in mind ...
Agency PageThe Intelligence Department
The Intelligence Department. By Garnet J. Wolseley. From the moment that war is declared until peace is made, it is of the utmost importance that we should know what the enemy is doing. A general who has the means of always learning the enemy's movements and intentions is certain to annihilate an adversary to whom his doings are unknown, all other things being equal. Napoleon said that a general operating in an inhabited country who was ignorant of the enemy's doings and intentions was ignorant of his profession; in writing on this subject to his brother in Spain, he said that the single motive of procuring intelligence would be sufficient to authorize detachments of 3,000 or 4,000 men being made to seize local authorities, post offices, etc., etc....