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A History of Pride at CIA

Before 1995, LGBT CIA officers were considered a security risk for potential blackmail by foreign intelligence services and officers could, and did, lose their jobs if they admitted to being, or were thought to be, LGBT. This began to change when President Bill Clinton signed Executive Order (EO) 12968 banning the withholding of security clearances from members of the LGBT community.

The EO sparked the push for diversity and inclusion inside the CIA and inspired three courageous LGBT officers to found ANGLE in 1996. The officers, two lesbians and a transgender woman within the CIA’s Directorate of Science and Technology, stood up and banded together to try and create a working environment that was equitable to all employees regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. The journey was not always easy and the evolution of changing the embedded internal culture of the CIA to be more diverse and inclusive was a monumental tasking.

Throughout the years, ANGLE sought out senior champions and allies, collaborated with other Agency employee resource groups, worked with policy offices, and educated the workforce on LGBT issues and concerns. In addition, ANGLE worked closely with the Diversity and Inclusion Office and its predecessors on community outreach efforts to LGBT professional groups and organizations outside the CIA to share their experiences. ANGLE was also instrumental in creating IC Pride, a resource group made up of members from agencies across the Intelligence Community (IC).

ANGLE today has hundreds of members, including allies and senior champions, and is one of the longest-standing employee resource groups in the IC.


For more information on ANGLE, CIA inclusion efforts, and CIA Pride, see:


Posted: Jun 01, 2020 12:05 PM
Last Updated: Jun 01, 2020 12:05 PM