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CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4
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October 22, 1965
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Anormied For Release_2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 22, UVU5 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE 27259 eqUality and dignity can be a living reality for all AnlericaPsi and , I'Vheriaa thia vital and. liable purpose has been effeetivey advanced by President Lyn- don_ B. Johnson, whose breadth of. Vision and brilliant leadership in this field are acknowl- edged with gratitude and admiration by the American people; and Whereas under President Johnson's out- standing effective leadership, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Civil Rights Act of 1961 have the potential to eliminate racial discrimination in many aspects of American life; and Whereas the implementation of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 have not met the high standards established by President Johnson and the Congress; and Whereas the high hopes of the American people are being frustrated by the slow implementation of these laws; Now, there- fore, be it Resolved by the Young Democratic Clubs of America meeting in contention that: Article 1. We call, upon the Department of Justice to use its extensive powers under the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to assign ad- ditional Federal voting registrars in all the many counties where Americans are still denied the right to vote by unconstitutional means. Article 2. We call upon all Federal agencies to implement title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which requires the withdrawal of Federal funds whereVer racial discrimination exists in federally supported programs until that racial discrimination ends, Article 3. The Young Democrats of America are encouraged to devise, implement and support programs which secure to all groups the right to share fully and equally, with dignity, in American society. FAIR HOUSING RESOLUTION SUBMITTED BY THE Yourro Dsztrocaaric CL17,0 or NEW JERSEY Whereas in, the ,1960 election campaign presidential candidate John F. Kennedy pledged that, if elected, he would ban dis- crimination practices in the Government's helping operations with a "stroke of the pen"; and Whereas on November 20, 1962, President Kennedy placed his signature on Executive Order No. 11063 banning discrimination in federally aided housing, and including a dec- laration that exclusion of Americans from stich housing because of their race, color, creed or national origin is "unfair, unjust, and inconsistent with the public policy of the United States as manifested in its Con- stitution and laws;" and . Whereas the order, though an important advanced principle, is limited in scope and (1) fails to embrace existing housing, even if such housing is federally assisted, (2) fails to cover loans by federally aided savings and loans associations and other similar institu- tions, and (3) fails to protect against dis- criminatory practices by these lenders; and Whereas housing segregation is tied directly to slums and slum conditions, to segregated schools, to inequalities in employment and to the poverty which haunts millions of Negro Americans and other minorities so movingly outlined by President Johnson in his Howard University speech in June 1965; and Whereas it remains the responsibility of the executive branch of the Government to com- plete the task of prohibiting discrimination in federally assisted housing, which it set out to accomplish in 1962: Now, therefore, bp it Resolved by the Young Democratic Clubs of America meeting in convention, That we d.O.,hereby _respectfully urge the President of the jiri1te-&-t.OsteS to alnend Executive Order N9. 1I068 84011PWC. ? - I. To prohibit discriminatory practices in mortgage loans by all banks and lending No. 198-19 institutions which are subject in any manner to regulation., supervision or control by an agency of. the Federal Government. 2. To cover all federally aided housing which was built or contracted for prior to November 20, 1962, and which continues to enjoy Federal assistance. In addition to the foregoing recommenda- tions, the YDCA also urges action on the following administrative matters: 1. The procedural power provided various Federal housing agencies to grant exemp- tions from the scope of the order should be withdrawn. Under this power the Federal Housing Administration has excluded the resale of single family homes. This exemp- tion vitiates the reach of the order and minimizes its effectiveness. 2. The President's Committee on Equal Oportunity in Housing should be directed to assume broad responsibility for the imple- mentation of the order and should be pro- vided with sufficient staff and budget ex- pansion to administer an effective national program. RACIAL VIOLENCE RESOLUTION Whereas in recent months lily-white southern juries, ignoring the overwhelming weight of the evidence, have in several cases, refused to indict or convict white southern- ers accused of serious crimes of violence against both Negro and white citizens denied the equal protection of the law; and Whereas the punishment of those guilty of crime is essential to the protection of the rights of the innocent and the failure to punish persons guilty of crimes such as murder against any citizen is a denial of the equal protection of the laws promised all citizens; and Whereas these recent events indicate that it may be impossible to obtain judges or juries in southern courts which are not biased against civil rights workers, and biased in favor of those who commit crimes against them; and Whereas bias on the part of the court and jury in favor of accused defendants is as detrimental to the preservation of law and order as is bias against such defendants: Now, therefore, be it Resolved, That the YDCA strongly deplore the denial of equal protection of the law of these Southern States; and be it further Resolved, That we urge that crimes of vio- lence against civil rfghts workers and any other citizen denied the equal protection of the law be made Federal offenses, to be tried in Federal court after indictment by a Fed- eral grand jury, in the hope that cases in these courts may be tried free of the racial bias which, in State courts, denies to civil rights workers the equal protection of the laws. M/SS/SSIPPI RESOLUTION?INTRODUCED BY MICHIGAN Whereas this 15th biennial convention of the Young Democratic Clubs of America has chartered a Mississippi Young Democratic organization which is racially integrated and broadly representative of all the people of Mississippi who support the national Demo- cratic Party and the progressive programs of President Lyndon B. Johnson; and Whereas the 1961 National Convention of the Democratic Party meeting in. Atlantic City, N.J., declared its national policy to be one of requiring and encouraging all State Democratic Parties to be racially integrated and open to all loyal Democrats and the spe- cial Lawrence Subcommittee of the Demo- cratic National Committee is now formulat- ing a program to enforce this policy; and Whereas Mississippi is a politically de- pressed area Where the lack of a loyal Demo- cratic Party organization and unconstitu- tional restrictions on the right to vote which meant that nearly half of all eligible Missis- sippians were not allowed to vote in 1964 elections resulted in the electoral votes of Mississippi being cast for the representative of rightwing reaction and negativism; and Whereas the Voting Rights Act of 1965 sponsored by the Johnson administration has recently been signed into law which enforces the right of every American to register and vote regardless of race and which the Democratic Party and the John- son administration are committed to vigor- ously and expeditiously enforce; and Whereas the absence of any other affiliated Democratic organization in Mississippi which supports the national Democratic Party means that the Young Democratic organiza- tion of Mississippi must build an organiza- tion from the ground up; and Whereas the members and officers of the young Democratic organization of Mississippi are to be particularly commended and are especially deserving of help by the Young Democratic Clubs of America because the current political situation in Mississippi means that it requires special acts of courage to affiliate with and support the national Democratic Party: Now be it hereby Resolved by the Young Democratic Clubs of America meeting in convention that. Article 1. The Young Democratic Clubs of America hereby pledge every form of assist- ance necessary for the Mississippi Young Democratic organization to grow and flourish so that it may build the Great Society in. Mississippi. Article 2. The President of the YDCA shall appoint a select committee to develop and administer a detailed program to implement article 1 which shall include but not be lim- ited to the encouragement of nationally prominent Democrats to speak in Mississippi under the aegis of the Mississippi Young Democrats and the recruitment of Young Democrats who are expert in membership recruitment and voter registration to help the Mississippi Young Democrats. All aspects of the detailed program shall be at the request of and with the approval of the executive committee of the Young Democratic Clubs of Mississippi. Article 3. A special Mississippi fund is hereby established which will be used to help the Mississippi Young Democratic organiza- tion to register voters, recruit members, and ? establish an active Young Democratic pro- gram in Mississippi. The national executive committee shall solicit contributions to the fund from regional, State, and local organi- zation of Young Democrats and from groups sympathetic to a vigorous Young Democratic organization in Mississippi. Article 4. The convention hereby calls upon its regional, State, and local organizations to adopt and help particular units of the Mis- sissippi Young Democrats by providing funds, supplies, and expert help under the direction of the special Mississippi com- mittee. INTOLERABLE CONDITION OF SHAW JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL (Mr. WHITENER asked and was given permission to address the House for I minute, to revise and extend his remarks, and to include extraneous matter.) Mr. WHITENER. Mr. Speaker, in recent months Members of Congress and the public have been greatly concerned about the intolerable condition of Shaw Junior High School. Anyone familiar with the condition of that school facility must agree that it should be abandoned at the earliest possible date and a new facility established. This is easier said than done. A school even though in bad physical con- dition, which is serving several hundreds Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved &sInIteEassslciga0iatibil8-___RDfiges0R446R00050MON9,-422, 27260 1965 of students, cannot be summarily aban- doned without providing another phys- ical plant to accommodate the dispos- ses.sed students. In the ease of the Shaw Junior High School many problems are presented which would not be present in a small town or rural area. There is the problem peculiar to a metropolitan area of finding a site within the service area of the school that is being aban- doned, and this is particularly true in the case of Shaw. Another problem that presents itself is that if a new site is located in the Shaw area it will be necessary to dis- possess residents and small business op- erators who are currently residing and operating in the area to be used for a future school building. These are real and existing problems which are much mire difficult to solve than many are willing to admit. It is quite easy to be critical of the Board of Education, the District Commissioners, and the Congress for continuing to use this substandard school facility, but it Is another thing to find a solution to the problem. This is particularly true in view of the fact that vacant land which the Board of Education already owns has recently been made available by the Board of Education to the Recreation Department for the John F. Kennedy Memorial Playground. The playground is serving a very use- ful purpose, and the recreational oppor- tunities it affords are badly needed. So with these complex problems it appears that there can be no solution by any one department or agency of the government of the District of Columbia. In order to accomplish a proper solution without imposing undue hardship upon any segment of the local population it seems to me that the time has come when several agencies and departments must sit down and discuss this matter and undertake to work out a prompt solution. I would suggest, Mr. Speaker, that in view of the fact that Shaw Junior High School is located in an area which lends itself to urban renewal that the board of education, the District Commission- ers, the Recreation Department, the Re- development Land Agency, the National Capital Planning Commission, the Na- tional Capital Housing Authority, and the President's Special Assistant on Dis- trict Affairs should Immediately consider the. possibility of instituting effective measures to correct the situation sur- rounding Shaw Junior High School and the area in which it is located. It seems to me that it may be possible for an urban renewal project to be planned which would make land available for the building of a new school facility while the present Shaw Junior High School is being used and then upon the completion of the new facility to convert the read estate upon which the school is located into housing or some other appropriate use. I think the time has come when posi- tive action must be taken. The need for such action should be clear to any ob- server. It is certainly clear to those of us Who have had a close relationship to the many problems confronting the peo- ple of the District of Columbia. As one Member of the Congress I ex- press the hope that such action be forth- with considered and pledge my personal support in any way possible in accom- plishing the elimination of an intolerable situation in our Nation's Capital. (Mr. WHITENER asked and was given permission to revise and extend his re- marks.) N IMMIGRATION (Mr. SHER asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his re- marks.) Mr. FISHER. Mr. Speaker, while we all sympathize with the plight of the political refugees who want to escape Castro's communistic tyranny, the time would seem to be overdue when our friends and allies in the free world should share with us the responsibility for pro- viding a home for these unfortunate people. About a quarter of a million Cubans have already been admitted since Castro took over. Under the new program none in military age will be permitted to leave Cuba. Most of the new refugees will be the elderly, the young, the ill, and cer- tain anti-Castro elements. The Asso- ciated Press has estimated that there are 50,000 of these people awaiting de- parture from the island. There may be more. It would seem that the United States should insist upon other countries ac- cepting more of the fleeing Cubans. What about Canada, Argentina, Aus- tralia, and many other nations which are quite capable of absorbing more im- migrants? It will be recalled that we had a joint arrangement with other countries In the handling of European displaced persons following World War II. The United States accepted most of these refugees. That fact, plus the large num- bers of Cubans already admitted, makes It even more imperative that our Govern- ment insist upon our allies sharing with us the solution of this problem. LEGISLATIVE ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE LAST 91/2 MONTHS (Mr. GILLIGAN asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his re- marks.) Mr. GILLIGAN. Mr. Speaker, at the close of this historic 1st session of the 89th Congress, most of the Nation's newspapers, magazines and journals have exhausted their glossaries of ad- jectives in describing the legislative achievements of the past 91/2 months. "Hard working," "productive," "ener- getic," "imaginative," "precedent-shat- tering" are some of the terms used by the most respected and influential jour- nals of the day in describing the 89th Congress, and although probably no sin- gle Member of the House is completely satisfied with everything that has been done in this Chamber since January, surely the overwhelming majority of the Members must be highly gratified at the manner in which the House and its great committees have handled this torrent of legislation. Surely it must be acknowl- edged that the House has worked its will on these great programs, and that the actions of the Congress have reflected quite accurately the judgment and deci- sion of the American people at the polls last November. The discussion and debate about this great legislative program?begun in the committees and in the well of the House? will and should continue in the months and years ahead in all sections of the land. But if we are to maintain our traditions as a representative democ- racy, and if we are to continue to give an example to the other nations of the world?and especially the newly emerg- ing nations who are tentatively groping their way towaftl responsible self-gov- ernment?it is essential that the con- tinuing political dialogue in America be conducted in a manner befitting a proud and free people, who have a great tra- dition of responsible self-government to defend and build upon. The manner in which we debate the course our Gov- ernment should take in the months and years ahead is of paramount impor- tance; reasoned discussion, buttressed by the careful analysis of the facts, is the minimal standard the American peo- ple should require in the debate of pub- lic issues. Certainly, loose talk, appeals to prejudice, inflammatory statements, scurrility, the resort to epithets, which, while distasteful, might have been tol- erable in an earlier age, can no longer be acceptable in the public arena. All of the verbal paraphenalia of the hate groups and the extremists of every de- scription must be resolutely shunned if our citizens are to have the opportunity to understand the problems which beset our society, and be enabled to make a reasoned and reasonable choice of solu- tions. As an example of the kind of discus- sion of public affairs which contributes very little to the understanding of the issues and problems which confront the American people, I would like to quote from an article which was published in the Cincinnati Post and Times-Star on October 19, 1965: Former Ohio Congressman Robert Taft, Jr., believes a major issue of the 1968 congres- sional campaign should be the abdication of its responsibility by the present "rub- berstamp Congress." In a talk before the Republican Forum in Denver, Colo., last night, Taft charged the present Congress has meekly surrendered the rights and duties of the legislative branch to the executive. Congress has passed administration bills with little or no debate, Taft said, and has provided no effective examination or dissent of programs. "At times the conduct of the present ma- jority in Congress seems more in the 'tradi- tion of Hitler's Reichstag than the long rec- ord of independence we have had on Capitol Hill," Taft said. My distinguished colleagues on both sides of the aisle can, I am sure, decide for themselves how appropriate, and how enlightening, and how ennobling it is to compare this ancient and honorable Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 2?906 Approved For ReleasearatEgioGIAINA-RLDIP_A70BROOD1461/M99080005-4 September 22, 1965 x,k-44 J. further consideration of H.R, 9336 and that the Senate proceed to immediate The PRESIDING OFFICER., The bill Will be stated by title for the informa- tion of the Senate. , The LEGISLATIVE CLERK. A bill (H.R. 9336) to amend title V of the Interna- tional Claims Settlement Act of 1949 re- lating to certain claims against the Government of Cuba. The PRESIDING 0.torICER. Is there objection to the request of the Senator from Montana? Without objection, the Committee on Foreign Relations is dis- charged, from further consideration of the bill. Is there objection to the present con- sideration of the bill? There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the bill. Mr. MANSFIELD. Mr. President, I move to strike out all after the enacting clause in H.R. 9336 and substitute cer- tain language therefor. I should add, the language in the amendment which I am proposing is identical to that which is contained in S. 1826, the Cuban claims bill passed by the Senate on September 21. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The amendment will be stated for the infor- mation of the Senate. - The IAGISLATIVE CLERK. It is proposed to strike out all after the enacting clause and substitute the following: That Section 501 of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 (22 U.S.C. 1643) is amended? (1) by striking out "which have arisen out of debts for merchandise furnished or serv- ices rendered by nationals of the United States without regard to the date on which such merchandise was furnished or services were rendered or"; and SEC. 2. Section 503 (a) of such Act (22 U.S.C. 1643b(a) ) is amended by striking out "aris- ing out of debts for merchandise furnished or services rendered by nationals Of the " United States without regard to the date on which such" merchandise was furnished or services Were rendered or". Sec. 3. Section 505(a) of such Act (22 U.S.C. 1643d) is amended by adding a new sentence at the end thereof as follows: "A claim under section 503(a) of this title based upon a debt or other obligation owing by any Corporation, association, or other entity organized under the laws of . the United States, or of any State, the District of Colum- bia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico shall be considered only when such debt or other obligation is a charge on property which has been nationalized, expropriated, intervened, or taken by the Government of Cuba." Sm. 4. Section 506 of such Act (22 U.S.C. 1648e) is amended by striking out ": Pro- vided, That the deduction of such amounts shall not be construed as divesting the United States of any rights against the Gov- ernment of Cuba for the amouxits so de- ducted". SEC. 5. Section 511 of such Act (22 U.S.C. 1643j) is amended to read as follows: "Arsztorai4TI9Dia , "SEC. 511. There are_hereby authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be neces- sary to enable the Commission to pay its ad- ministrative expenses incurred in carrying out its functions under this title." ? The 'amendment was agreed to. The bill Was ordered to be engrossed for a third _reading, read the third time, and passed. PERSECUTION OF JEWS IN SOVIET RUSSIA Mr. BYRD of West Virginia. Mr. President, I wish to express my support of Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 17, as previously passed b ythe U.S. Senate, which is now awaiting concurrence by the Senate with House amendments. This resolution, expressing the sense of the Congress in condemnation of the per- secution of Jewish citizens by the U.S.S.R., is a measure of the indignation aroused in many areas of the world by the discriminatory treatment being ac- corded its Jewish minority by the Soviet Government. By focusing the attention of the world on the restrictive treatment accorded to Russian Jewry, there may be some hope of greater relaxation of the rigid regula- tions on the religious practices of that faith and other faiths. It is not surprising to me when the U.S.S.R., as a basically atheistic nation, acts to repress those who profess reli- gious beliefs. I can but hope that the Soviet Government, in an effort to en- hance its public image abroad, may make it easier for Jewish citizens and others to practice their respective faiths. Actu- ally, I am told that action in recent times to permit the printing of approximately 10,000 Yiddish prayerbooks represented some concession, although, admittedly, a small one in view of the approximately 21/2 million Jews in Soviet Russia. I am also informed that representatives of the Yiddish theater groups have been per- mitted some travel among parts of the Soviet Union. Unfortunately, all church groups are heavily restricted in Russia, although, perhaps, the Russian Ortho- dox Church fares better than others as it does have an organization in Russia. Visitors to that country report that while the synagogues are poor in appear- ance, the Baptist Church also is in poor condition. Again, I wish to associate myself with the pending resolution condemning the persecution of persons by Soviet Russia because of their religion. I am proud to have served as one of its cosponsors. THE PRESIDENT'S LAWYER Mr. HARTKE. Mr. President, the Attorney General of the United States, Nicholas Katzenbach, has won the re- spect and admiration of a great many people both in and out of Washington. His efforts on behalf of the Voting Rights Act passed this year, as well as other ac- tions on behalf of justice for all our citizens, have won acclaim from leaders in the race relations field across the Nation. We are fortunate to have such a competent man of convictions and skills as head of the Justice Depart- ment. A recent issue of the Indianapolis Star presented a profile view of Mr. Katzen- bach in an appraisal written by Joseph E. Mohbat, of the Associated Press. I ask unanimous consent that this article, subtitled "The President's Lawyer," be printed in the RECORD. There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: THE PRESIDENT'S LAWYER?NICK KATZENBACH OUTLINES HIS FOUR MAIN GOALS (By Joseph E. Mohbat) WAsims-croN.?One of the newest weekend visitors to President Johnson's retreat at Camp David, Md., is a bald-psted, tall, some- what dishevelled man who?according to Washington gossip?wasn't supposed to last long enough to get his name on the big office door in the Department of Justice. Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach, the 65th Attorney General of the United States, has by all signs won the esteem 'of the Chief Executive. The President, according to some, looks upon the 43-year-old lawyer as one of the brainiest men in government today. ? Yet, for 5 months Nicholas Katzenbach cooled his heels, holding the title of Deputy Attorney General and hearing the stories that Lyndon Baines Johnson would most cer- tainly bring in another man to replace ROBERT F. KENNEDY. KENNEDY was leaving last year to run for the Senate from New York, and the notion was that Mr. Johnson felt Katzenbach was too closely identified with Kennedy. But in January Katzenbach got the word. He was going to be Attorney General. As such, he became a member of the Cabinet, "the President's lawyer" so to speak, and head of the Department of Justice. The De- partment, with 30,000 employees, runs such wide-ranging affairs as the FBI, the Immigra- tion and Naturalization Service, antitrust prosecutions, enforcement of civil rights legislation, the Bureau of Prisons, and the U.S. marshals. What does Katzenbach have to say about his job? What are his goald as the Nation's highest law officer? "It's hard to talk about it generally," he says, "except for my obvious feeling that it's terribly important to achieve an even- handed administration of justice, and that it be done entirely on merits. "I guess there are four things I'd really like to accomplish, if I have enough days, months, or years allotted to me here: "I think our fiscal and administrative sys- tem in the Department is outmoded, and I'd like to do something like Secretary Mc- Namara did over at Defense. I'd like to know how much it costs us to administer Justice, and thus I'd know a lot more about my Department. I'd like to know, for in- stance, to what extent we could use com- puters on the. Immigration Service or the FBI. "I'd like to come as near as possible to clearing up civil rights problems enough so that you almost wouldn't need a civil rights division in this Department to insure that Constitutional guarantees are being en- forced. This would be best for the country, certainly, "It would be hard to find anything more Important than the job to be done on the crime front. (Katzenbach heads the newly formed National Crime Commission.) We're going to step up the drive against organized crime. I want to see what we can do with crime in the streets. "And I'd like to see whether we can come up with a good, rational, coherent, effective, and understandable antitrust policy. Per- haps we simply haven't articulated it well enough in the past. But I think the in- fluence of our antitrust division should go far beyond actual cases; it should influence and reflect the economic policies of the Gov- ernment." The President's lawyer pauses a moment, then says: "I don't know?perhaps I've bitten off more than I can chew. But I'd sure like to try it." As a public official, Katzenbach is ad- mired by his supporters for two main rea- sons: his gift as a conciliator, and his will- . _ Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For ReleaseATONSL2_6 ? ClAzRDP67B00446R000500080005-4. September 22, 1965 CONGRESSIUN coRD ? SE.NA:1 E --?3905 hearings on S. 597 showed the plight of our health science libraries. The American Medical Association presented the findings of a 1964 study that showed: Only 15 of the 87 medical school librarie,s,have sufficient space; More than one-half of the medical school libraries were built prior to 1933; As long ago as 1957 more than one- half of the medical school libraries were filled to capacity or had exceeded their capacity; Only 14 of 87 existing medical schools have the recommended level of 100,000 volumes on their library shelves; and There are 6,000 health science libraries but only 3,000 librarians with specialized training or experience in the health sci- ence library field. The rapid rate at which we are ac- cumulating new medical knowledge makes it imperative that we take action now to strengthen and expand our health science libraries. CONSTRUCTION S. 597 would authorize an aggregate of $50 million over a 4-year period, 1967- 70, for grants to nonprofit institutions to pay up to 75 percent of the costs of constructing health science library facil- ities. 'TRAIN/NG, RESEARCF/, BASIC RESOURCES The legislation would also authorize appropiations of $45 million for the 5 years 1966-70 to finance first, training of health science library personnel; second, assistance to special scientific projects dealing with advancements in the sci- ences related to health; third, research and development in health library sci- ence; fourth, improvement of basic library resources; and fifth, temporary support for scientific publications. REGIONAL HEALTH SCIENCE LIBRARIES To supplement health science library services, the bill authorizes appropria- tions of $22.5 million over the fiscal years 1966-70 to establish and maintain regional health science libraries. The need for regional service has become acute with the groVith in he size of the medical literature. It is neither eco- nomically feasible nor necessary for each medical library to try to build its col- lection to encompass even a sizable part of the whole of medical literature. In total S. 597 authorizes appropria- tions amounting to $117.5 million over the 5 years 1966-70. The legislation is supported by the Medical Library As- sociation, the Association of Research Libraries, the Special Libraries Asso- ciation, the Chairman of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medi- cine, the Association of American Medi- cal Colleges, the American College of Physicians,. the American Heart Asso- ciation, the American Medical Associa- tion, the American Dental Association, and the Medical Library Center of New York. Many other associations, uni- versities, colleges, and individuals con- tacted the committee in writing to ex- press their support for S. 597. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, Will the Senator from Alabama yield? Mr. HILL. I yield. Mr. DOMINICK. I am happy to join No. 175-19 the Senator frOm Alabama, who has done such great work in this field. As the Senator knows, I have been active in title II of the Higher Education Act, try- ing to do something in connection with library facilities. This is another step in the same area, which I congratulate the Senator on accomplishing. I raised one question prior to this time, which is a fundamental principle, so far as I am concerned, whether we had a limiting authorization for each year, or whether the authorization was open ended. My understanding is that the committee changed it so that it is a lim- iting authorization; Is that not correct? Mr. HILL. The Senator is correct. Mr. DOMINICK. I thank the Senator. Mr. HILL. Let me take this opportu- nity to express my appreciation to the Senator from Colorado for the fine help which he gave in having the bill acted upon by the committee. Mr. DOMINICK. I am happy to have been able to cooperate. Mr. MORSE. Mr. President, will the Senator from Alabama yield? Mr. HILL. I am happy to yield to the Senator from Oregon. Mr. MORSE. I wish to express my congratulations and compliments to the Senator from Alabama [Mr. HILL] for his leadership in carrying through the present bill before the Senate to the point of passage, which is about to take place. As the Senator from Alabama knows, we on the Committee on Labor and Pub- lic Welfare, which has jurisdiction over all education legislation, are very much concerned with the problem which con- fronts us in connection with the libraries of the United States. There are various educational insti- tutions, as the Senator from Colorado has just pointed out, in the higher edu- cation bill, S. 600?in regard to which we go to conference with the House tomor- row?which has a title devoted to the question of providing Federal assistance to institutions of higher learning in this country, in an endeavor to raise library standards and to provide more adequate facilities for the students of the country. One of the features of that kind of bill Is a provision that will be of assistance to the Library of Congress, providing funds and facilities so that the Library of Congress can be of assistance to the college libraries of the country?public libraries also for that matter?in help- ing them to improve their library services. The need, however, for assistance to medical libraries is just as great, and it falls under the jurisdiction of the sub- committee of the Senate committee, over which the chairman of the full com- mittee also serves as chairman of th subcommittee. The bill the Senate is considerin stands in the same class, in my opinion, with the title of the higher education bill which provides similar assistance to the libraries of the country. I am very glad that the Senator has been persist- ent in regard to this matter. Let me say to the medical profession that this is another example of Federal aid which the medical profession has re- ceived from the taxpayers of the country for decades. This is another example that proves the position I have taken over many years, when I have listened to doctors opposing medical care legisla- tion, that their memories are short, that the assistance and aid which the Fed- eral Government has given them over the years, in payment of part of their medical expenses, and providing the laboratories and facilities so that they could become doctors, puts them, in my judgment, in an untenable position when Congress seeks to come to the health assistance of the needy and aged of this country with a medical care bill. Be that as it may, I wish the doctors of this country to know that once again I can be counted upon to come to their assistance in seeing to it that facilities are provided so that we can continue to train the best doctors in the world. I say that because American doctors are the best doctors in the world. The trouble is that a great many of them lack a social conscience. Mr. HILL. Let me say to the Senator from Oregon that he has rendered a great service in behalf of having the committee report the bill favorably to the Senate. He is here now to vote for passage of the bill. He has rendered out- standing service in the passage of the higher education bill, which does so much for libraries generally throughout the country, and which will be of vast sig- nificance and great help to these libraries. I express my appreciation to him for what he has done to help in the passage of the pending bill, and also for the great work he did in passage of the higher edu- cation bill, which will do so much for libraries generally. Mr. MORSE. I thank the Senator. Mr. HILL. Mr. President, I ask unan- imous consent that the committee amendments be agreed to en bloc. The PRESIDING OleriCER. Without objection, the committee amendments will be considered en bloc; and, without objection, they are agreed to. The billwas ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed. The title was amended, so as to read: "An Act to amend the Public Health Service Act to provide for a program of grants to assist in meeting the need for adequate health science library services and facilities." Mr. HILL. Mr. President, I move that the vote by which the bill was passed be reconsidered. Mr. MORSE. Mr. President, I move that the mo ion to reconsider be laid on the b otion to lay on the table was to. DMENT OF TITLE V OF THE INTERNATIONAL CLAIMS SETTLE- MENT ACT OF 1949 RELATING TO CERTAIN CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT OF CUBA Mr. MANSt, ItLD. Mr. President, I asks unanimous consent that the Committee on Foreign Relations be discharged from Approved For Release 200310912&: CIA-RDP6'7600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 September 24, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX me, constitute a grave mistake of major and lasting consequences." The present outlook for the home rule bill is that this prophecy will be put to the tt. Ike Speaks Out: Bay of Pigs All J.F.K.'s .....1101?????????16. EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. JOHN W. WYDLER OF NEW yoax IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Friday, September 24, 1965 Mr. WYDLER. Mr. Speaker, recently our Nation has been flooded by bio- graphical sketches of the late Presi- dent John F. Kennedy. Included in these biographies are the authors' re- spective versions of the late President's Intimate musings, deliberations, reason- ing, and conclusions over the episode of the Bay of Pigs These biographies refer to formerPresident Eisenhower's role during his administration in events lead- ing up to the Bay of Pigs denouement. With these words, the editor and pub- lisher of Newsday, Harry F. Guggen- heim, introduced a truly remarkable Interview- with President Eisenhower an the part he played long before the tragedy of the Bay of Pigs. President Eisenhower, in the interest of historic accuracy, has given the public facts about these earlier events. At a recent meeting at Gettysburg with Mt. Guggenheim and Mr. Earl Mazo, Presi- dent Eisenhower gave his account of the situation as it existed when he left the White House. I consider this a truly remarkable document and one which will set the record straight on this most important event on the history of our Nation. The intervir follows: IKE SPEAKS OUT : BAY OF PIGS WAS ALL (By Earl Mazo) _ After our country's humiliation at the Bay of Pigs in 1961, Republican ex-President Eisenhower's only comment was to call for bipartisan unity behind Democratic Presi- dent Kennedy. That was in keeping with Eisenhower's lifelong practice of supporting the Nation's Commander in Chief in times of crises. Over the years General Eisenhower has demonstrated little taste for political parti- sanship and absolutely none for partisan excesses. In fact, he usually has ignored politically tinged distortions on his per- formance as President, military leader, and elder statesman. Now, however, he feels it would be well to set therecord straight on at least a couple of items in recent intimate histories of the Ken- nedy administration, by Arthur M. Schle- singer, Jr., and Theodore C. Sorenson, rank- ing members of Kennedy's staff. The gen- eral and several of his knowledgeable former Government associates view the Schlesinger and Sorenson attempts to link the Eisen- hower administration with the Cuba invasion fiasco and discredit EisenhoWer-appointed military and intelligence experts as a per- version of history and a disservice to the late President Kennedy, who never sought to duck responsliblity for his executive decisions. The specifically disputed material by both riters is summed up in this paragraph from he Sorenson version: "On January 20, 1961, John Kennedy inherited the plan, the plan- ners, and most troubling of all, the Cuban exile brigade. * * * Unlike an inherited policy statement or Executive order, this in- heritanee could not be simply disposed of by Presidential recision or withdrawal." Eisenhower declares, "There was no tactical or operational plan even discussed" as of the day he turned the Presidency over to John Kennedy. During the transition period be- tween the election in November 1960, and the inauguration in January 1961, Eisen- hower reviewed for his successor all pending matters, including a secret program inaug- urated less than a year before to equip and train anti-Castro Cuban refugees. The retir- ing President stressed that there had been no decisions as to how the Cuban forces would be used, if at all. Eisenhower had made no commitments that might bind the new President in dealing with the Castro prob- lem. In fact, the armed refugee group was still so small and relatively unprepared that it could easily have been disbanded if the incoming administration considered its existence unnecessary. As for the nonpolitical experts Kennedy chose to retain for his administration? notably Allen Dulles, Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and the military Joint Chiefs of Staff?Eisenhower says: "These men over decades of devoted service have shown their capabilities, their sense of logic, their understanding of the problems involved In this kind of venture. There is no more expert group in their profession than these men * * * I had the greatest confidence in them." Nothing the former President was told Kdnnedy and others after the Bay-of- Pigs debacle diminished his faith and con- fidence in Dulles and the military chiefs. On the other hand, he believes the very dis- paragement of these seasoned professionals shows how unqualified the former Pres- idential assistants were to deal with the sort of problem involved in a critical interna- tional venture like the Bay of Pigs invasion. Like most Americans, President Eisen- hower welcomed the end of the Batista dic- tatorship in 1959 and hoped the new regime of Fidel Castro would live up to its promises of free elections and democracy in the exotic island republic just 8 jet minutes from Florida. Within a year, however, Castro created a dictatorship that was worse even than l3atista's and President Eisenhower had concluded that strong measures might be required to thwart what appeared to be Castro's intention of establishing an out- post for Communist subversion in the West- ern Hemisphere. Exactly what would have to be done?and when?remained to be thought out and decided. But the gravity of the situation neither awed nor frightened those facing it. Eisenhower and his administration's military and intelligence experts were not strangers to the nuances of contending with Communist intrusion in Latin America. Ex-Dictator Jacobo Arbenz Guzman, whose efforts to make Guatemala a haven for the Soviets led to his downfall in 1964, would bear witness to that. In mid-March 1960, President Eisenhower decided that the United States would se- cretly aid anti-Castro Cubans. The CIA was directed to train and equip volunteers at bases in Guatemala, Panama, and southern Florida. The covert military instruction program was started partly in response to pleas by hundreds of refugees for something constructive to do. It was felt training would bolster the spirts of thousands who A5435 were fleeing the Castro dictatorship, and would give them hope that, in time, they would be able to do the job of ousting the Communist regime. In essence, the long-range Eisenhower pol- icy was to encourage and prepare Cubans to liberate their country. President Eisenhower kept in close- touch with developments through the summer and autumn, and per- sonally reviewed numerous ideas and sug- gestions that normally would have been sifted out before reaching the White House. (For example, he rejected a proposal that the Cubans be trained in Samoa to insure tighter security than was possible in Central Amer- ica.) In recalling that period, the general notes the Bay of Pigs was never mentioned or con- sidered in discussions of possible alternatives and contingencies. Most attention focused on prospects for an operation of some sort In or near the Escambray Mountains where a government in exile might establish itself on Cuban soil. Before there could be serious planning, however, the Cubans needed not only a well- supplied fighting force but also the leader- ship to organize a functioning government in exile. The leader or leaders had to be recog- nized and accepted by the Cuban people. That eliminated experienced individuals from the Batista regime and several leaders of peppery political factions who bristled at the thought of cooperating or sharing the glory of overthrowing Castro. The Cubans were still without their own leadership when President Eisenhower re- tired and President Kennedy was inaugu- rated as America's Commander in Chief. In Washington, the changeover of Executive command, with Democrats replacing Repub- licans in nearly every key position through- out the Government, was the smoothest in modern times. The harmonious transition was directed by the President and President- elect. The departing administration could not avoid bequeathing certain critical problems to its successor. But efforts were made to lighten burdens, where possible. There was, for instance, the last minute Eisenhower di- rective ordering thousands of dependents of overseas service personnel returned to the United States. A review of the international trade and monetary: situation convinced Eisenhower that America's worsening bal- ance-of-payments position would require drastic action sooner or later. Since the everyday spending of service families added up to an enormous annual dollar drain, the recall of dependents was among priority measures Treasury officials expected the Ken- nedy administration to consider. By issu- ing the recall directive himself, Eisenhower took the onus for that unpopular action, and spared the new President. The balance-of-payments situation was one of three major unresolved problems Eisen- hower reviewed at length for Kennedy at transition sessions. The Communist threat in Laos and Castro's Cuba were the others. "I told him exactly what we had been doing (in the Cuban refugee program)," recalls Eisenhower, "and pinpointed the centers at which apprOximately 500 men were then being trained." Eisenhower felt that Kennedy shared his judgment that the new administration need not rush a decision regarding the Cubans. "At no time did I put before anybody any- thing that could be called a plan (to invade Cuba)," declares the former President. He emphasizes that there was "no mandate, no commitment by me or anyone in my admin- istration," and he doubts that Kennedy felt "he was frozen to any position by me." Among Eisenhower's last, words to Ken- nedy before the ceremonial ride up Pennsyl- vania Avenue to the inauguration was: "You Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A5436 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX September 24, 1965 people will have to decide what to do." The two men did not speak with each other again for 3 months. Then, after the Bay of Pigs disaster, Kennedy hurriedly invited the gen- eral to Camp David and sent a White House helicopter to Gettysburg for him. Kennedy stated he sought the visit to "bring (Eisenhower) up to date on recent events and get the benefit of his thoughts and experience." The President met the for- mer President at the landing pad. It was April 22. (The Bay of Pigs invasion had be- gun on April 17, and within a day or two Castro had wiped it out.) Eisenhower re- calls that Kennedy seemed quite composed, but eager to talk out his young administra- tion's humiliating experience. It was a long and wide-ranging conversa- tion. Like many military figures who had no inside information as to what happened, the general wondered whether the intasion really had been launched, as reported, without air cover and other elementary ingredients fami- liar even to junior officers, like plans for rein- forcing and resupplying the beachhead. ? At one point Eisenhower asked his host if the Joint Chiefs of Staff had approved the battle plan. Kennedy nodded and said, "with a few changes." Among other things, Kennedy explained, the original plan had been trimmed to avoid letting the world see "America's hand" in the operation. Eisen- hower suggested that the country's prestige and power should never by committed un- less its Chief Executive was determined to win. "There is no alternative," said the general. "Force is a naked, brutal thing in this world. If you are going to use it, you have got to be prepared to go all the way." That afternoon Eisenhower stated at a news conference that all Americans should "support the man who has to carry the re- sponsibility for our foreign affairs"?mean- ing, President Kennedy. Subsequently, the former Republican President publicly reaf- firmed his backing of the Democratic Presi- dent at every opportunity, including Repub- lican political gatherings, until the crisis ? atmosphere abated. While reflecting recently on the blunders that insured defeat at the Bay of Pigs?and thus entrenching, instead of overthrowing the Castro dictatorship?Eisenhower was re- minded that Guatemala probably still would be a Communist strfarighold if political advice had prevailed during a crucial stage of the anti-Arbenz venture in 1954, as hap- pened during the anti-Castro venture in 1961. The invasion of Guatemala, which was led and conducted by Guatemalan volunteers but covertly sponsored and supplied by the United States, floundered just as it was on the brink of success. The crisis stemmed from sudden lack of air support. Two of the liberating force's three aircraft had been destroyed, and without replacements the in- vasion would be doomed. In Washington, President Eisenhower summoned military, intelligence and diplo- matic experts. A State Department spokes- man argued for a political, not a military decision. He contended that by sending replacement aircraft to Guaten;a1a, America would risk having its role in the anti-Arbenz venture discovered, and that, in turn, would damage our prestige throughout ,Latin America. Allen Dulles, the intelligence director whose agency was masterminding the in- vasion, argued that the airplanes were essen- tial to success?and therefore should be sent. President Eisenhower agreed with Dulles. And a couple of days later the Communist regime in Guatemala was overthrown. Eisenhower's reasoning in that crisis was con- sistent with the adviCe he offered President Kennedy 9 years later. "If our hand had been discovered, then it was more Important than ever that we win," he said. U.S. Office of Education: A Growing Federal Bureaucratic Octopus EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. HAROLD R. COLLIER OF ILLINOIS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, September 22, 1965 Mr. COLLIER. Mr. Speaker, under leave to extend my remards in the RECORD, I include the following two edi- torials from the Chicago Tribune which should be a source of deep concern to the legislators of this country, as well as to every citizen and school board member In the United States: [From the Chicago (Ill.) Tribune, Sept. 22, 1965] FEDERAL TENTACLES /N THE SCHOOLS Representative ROBERT H. MicNKL, of Illi- nois, has 'come upon a secret memorandum which he says is proof that the Federal Gov- ernment "is insidiously planning a complete takeover" of our public school systems. The memo contains the minutes of a recent meeting of the Office of Education and deals with the agency's "future role and responsi- bilities" in relation to State and local agen- cies. It states that "no Office of Education hand is to be tied down by (1) having to deal only through a backward State education agency, or (2) not being able to deal directly with urban jurisdictions, however competent the State agency, when direct relationships seem most in the public interest." The Illinois Republican has run into a curtain of silent in his efforts to find out why the Office of Education is so eager to bypass "backward" (meaning, no doubt, un- cooperative) State agencies. If its motives are innocent and are consistent with the Government's repeated assurances that Fed- eral aid will not mean Federal control of education, then why the secrecy? Mr. MICHEL thinks that there is "some- thing to hide," and with good reason. The Office of Education's hand has already begun to wander into affairs not properly its own. Two out of every five high school physics students, Mr. MICHEL says, are using text- books prepared under Federal auspices. Federalization is even spreading to the hu- raan.ities. One Office of Education official has talked of designing "the total English curriculum from kindergarten through col- lege years." Beyond this, the Office of Education has ordered hearings to determine whether Fed- eral funds should be denied to school districts in six Southern States which are accused of fail to desegregate. The Supreme Court has ruled that the diberate segregation is a mat- ter for Federal concern; but is the Office of Education, which is supposedly dedicated to improving education, the proper agency to carry out social reforms which are often likely to detract from the quality of education? The Office of Education has been nagging at Chicago's school officials?not for failing to desegregate, but apparently for failing to bring about forced integration, which is not a matter for Federal concern at all and is bound to interfere with the quality of edu- cation. In short, the evidence is all too clear that the Federal Government intends to use Fed- eral aid as a means of exerting control over State and local school affairs and that the Office of Education's interests will not even be confined to academic matters. A wise Supreme Court ruled in 1936 that "the power to confer or withhold unlimited benefits is the power to coerce or destroy." A more subservient and less wise Supreme Court ruled 6 years later that it is wholly proper "for the Government to regulate that which it subsidizes." Once the subsidies start, control is sure to follow?despite all protestations to the contrary. We said so from the beginning,, but the control has come even faster than we thought. [From the Chicago Tribune, Sept. 24, 1865] SCHOOL BRAINWASHING "Just who's writing those classroom tests?" asks the Republican congressional committee newsletter, with reference to some items in nationally used intelligence tests and current events periodicals. The newsletter cites 'a series of objective test Items in which the answers offered convey explicitly or implicitly partisan conclusions. This can be done in both of two ways. Answers which only a blindly proadminis- tration Democrat could accept as statements of fact are called correct. (Example: "The President's Great Society is a place where America is growing richer, stronger, happier, and wiser." True or false? Approved answer: True.) Replies which testmakers concede to be false present a disparaging but presumably plausible image of Republicans, one which will influence many youngsters who will never come back to the item to consider which responses are wrong and why. (Ex- ample: "A club that accepts only very rich members is said to be (a) snobbish, (b) ex- clusive, (c) conservative, (d) Republican, (e) un-American." Approved answer: "Ex- clusive," but meanwhile "Republican" has been associated with such negative terms as "snobbish" and "un-American.") Nationally published objective tests are extremely popular with school authorities for a number of reasons. They are inexpen- sive, require no local effort in preparation, and no thought in grading. Also, they save time. But they are easy to manipulate in such partisan ways as the Republican news- letter rightly decries. And they are in- herently too oversimplified for the complex- ities and ambiguities of judgments in the social studies. An instrument that may work well in arithmetic does not necessarily, work well in political science. However, objective tests will be used, and they will be less than thoroughly objec-, tive. If they are to be loaded to a minimum extent, publishers should insist (as obviously they are not always doing) on having repre- sentatives of differing views examine politi- cally significant items. If a reasonable man of strong views protests an item as unfair to his party or his principles, perhaps that item should not be put before children to be rated as right or wrong, true or false. As educators generally want Federal hand- outs that Republicans for the most part oppose, any bias in school tests is likely to be against Republicans rather than for them. -Republicans especially have reason to be vigilant against the intrusion into the schools of whitewash and smear. And edu- cators who care about truth will do well to minimize their reliance on devices that in- vite oversimplification. Constitution Week EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. GEORGE HANSEN OF IDAHO IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, September 14, 1965 Mr. HANSEN of Idaho. Mr. Speaker, on this, the last day of Constitution Approved For Release 2003/09/26 :CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 Friday, October 22, 1965 ? . First session of Eighty-ninth Congress adjourned sine die. Senate Chamber Action Routine Proceedings, pages 27115-27140, 27364 Bills Introduced: 31 bills and II resolutions were intro- duced, as follows: S. 2701-2731; S.J. Res. 122; and S. Res. 155-164. Pages 27117-27118,27347-27348 Bills Reported: Reports were made as follows: H.R. 10878, private bill (S. Rept. 932) ; H, -Con. Res. 509, providing for printing of additional copies of hearings on crime in D.C. (S. Rept. 933); R Con. Res. 512, providing for printing of additional copies of hearings on D.C. home rule (S. Rept. 934) ; H. Con. Res. 513, providing for printing of additional copies of hearings on "Lower Colorado River Basin Project," 89th Congress, ist session (S. Rept. 935) ; H. Con. Res. 519, providing for printing of additional copies of hearings on H.R. 2580, proposing various amendments to the immigration and nationality laws (S. Rept. 936) ; HA. 30, providing for U.S. participation in the - Inter- American Cultural and Trade Center in Dade County, Fla., without recommendation, and with amendments and minority views (S. Rept. p37), and H,R. 4845, to provide for the economic and efficient acquisition and use of automatic data processing equip- ment by Federal departments and agencies (S. Rept. 938). Pages 27117,27347 Measures Referred: Numerous House passed bills and House passedresolutions were referred to appropriate committees Page 27162 Authority To Report: Committee on Government Operations was authorized to file reports during con- gressional adjournment and that its report on Inter- agency Drug Coordination be printed as a Senate docu- Ment. Page 271 36 Private Bill: Senate agreed to Houk amendment with . . an amendment to S. 619, private bill. Page 27139 Secretary of the Senate: Emery L. Frazier, of Ken- tuckx, was administered oath of office as Secretary of the Senate to become effective January1966. Page 27163 In connection with tills matter. Senate adopted three resolutions, as follows: S. Res. 156, notifying House of election of Emery L. Frazier, of Kentucky, to be Secretary of the Senate, effective January 1,1966; S. Res. 157, notifying President of election of Emery L. Frazier, of Kentucky, to be Secretary of the Senate, effective January r, 1966; and S. Res. 158, authorizing the printing as a Senate docu- ment of a compilation of tributes delivered in Congress on the occasion of the retirement of Secretary of the Senate Felton M. Johnston, of Mississippi. Page 27163 Federal Employees' Pay: Senate passed, by unanimous vote of 67 yeas, H.R. 10281, proposed Government Em- ployees Salary Comparability Act of 1965, after adopting committee amendments en bloc, including two of a technical clarifying nature offered on the floor by Sena. tor Monroney. Pages 27165-27176 Alaska Exposition: Senate passed with amendments S. 2614, to provide for participation in the Statewide Exposition to be held in Alaska during 1967, after adopt- ing committee amendments en bloc, which were then considered as original text for purpose of further amend- ment, and Williams (Delaware) amendment to reduce authorization for project from $4 million to $3 million. Motion to reconsider passage of this bill was tabled. Pages 27184-27190 Coast Guard: S. 2471 to amend in several regards the laws relating to the administration of the Coast Guard, was passed with committee amendments. Pages 271 81-2 71 83 Printing: Senate concurred in House amendment to Senate amendment to S. Con. Res. 65, to authorize print- ing as a Senate document of a study entitled "The Anti- Vietnam Agitation and the Teach-In Movement," pre- pared for use of Subcommittee on Internal Security of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary. This completed legislative action on the resolution. Page 27221 It was ordered that report of the majority on activities and accomplishments of the 1st session of the 89th Con- gress be printed as a Senate document. Page 27221 89th Congress Summary: It was ordered that reports on behalf of the minority respecting laws and treaties of general interest, activities of the 1st session of the 89th Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 October 22, 1965 ApprovettKaftb2003/0.9120 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 'NAL ittLORD ? APPENDIX A5949 lie limelight in Cuba has led to widespread speculation, is actively directing the sub- version campaign in Latin America and has been traveling from one hemisphere country to another. A former secretary general of the Bank Employees Union of Havana, Alvarez de la Camps came to Panama at the invitation of the Labor Confederation to attend a con- gress held Sunday. He called on President Marco A. Robles yesterday to present him with a certificate of recognition from the Cuban Democratic Revolutionary Labor Front. He plans to leave for Central America soon. Anarchy?A Major Threat Today EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. SAMUEL L. DEVINE OF OHIO IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Friday, October 22,1965 Mr. DEVINE. Mr. Speaker, Albert Schlossberg, National Editor of the Jew- ish Veteran, in an editorial in the Sep- tember 1965 issue gave a well-reasoned analysis of the law and order issue facing this Nation today. With the automatic cry of police brutality being used by many lawless elements to cover their activities, arti- cles such as written by Mr. Schlossberg are most welcome. The article follows: ANAacny?A MAJ"OR THREAT TODAY? (By Albert Schlossberg) America has been especially blessed, for the framers of the Constitution saw to it that we would have a strong framework of rules and regulations to bind us together as an intelligent society. Deep-rooted In that Constitution has been an ever-present, firm respect for law and order. Of late I have heard murmurs, from many sources, that perhaps this traditional Amer- ican philosophy is outmoded. Manifesta- tions of the conundrum have cropped up in scattered sections of the United States, and In some quarters we have heard "We'll only obey the laws that we agree with." Is this the first chink in the dike that has kept America immune from any threat of anarchy? Let's explore the issue, with- out taking sides and see where our investi- gation leads us. From a neutral vantage point I'd like to examine one facet of our society that seems to be in danger of an imminent breakdown, the relationship of the citizen, you and me, to the people charged with the duty to pro- tect us, the police departments, local and State. The catalyst in this instance seems to be a catch-phrase, often loosely used, "po- lice brutality." Well, what about "police brutality"? What happens in your mind when you hear those two words? Do you think of Hitler's storm troopers? Stalin's 0.0.P.U. or Bull Connor's "special deputies"? When is a police officer "brutal"? Just how far can the representative of the law go in the pursuit of his duties? The train- ing manuals of almost all police departments in the United States contain instruction in- dicating that the officers are authorize to use "reasonably necessary" force when intactng an arrest. The policeman is warned that it is not his duty to "punish" a suspect by us- ing unnecessary force. It is made clear to the law enforcement personnel that under the American system a suspect 113 consid- ered innocent until proven guilty to the sat- isfaction of a judge or jury. Perhaps you saw the same TV news broad- cast that I did the other evening. A re- porter was interviewing a young man who had been injured while participating in a demonstration in a northern city. The young man explained how he had been in- jured, and then concluded by stating, in response to a query, that the participants in the demonstration had been "instructed to chant 'police brutality' if a police officer attempted to place them in custody." Let's not delude ourselves; of course, if we examine the record we will find that among the nearly 200,000 policemen in the United States there certainly are some who are brutal and we will also find, it seems to me, a sadist or two who get their kicks out of beating up on a prisoner. However, you will also find many dedicated individuals doing an often thankless job that you or I would refuse to accept. By and large the cop on the beat or in the patrol Car is no different from a cross section of any profes- sion, or selected group in our modern-day society?some good, some bad, some medi- ocre, and mostly average citizens. The policeman's lot is not an easy one. In the United States, in 1964, 18,000 police- men were assaulted in line of duty. Of the 18,000, 57 were murdered and nearly 8,000 received serious injuries. Several communities seem to be on the right track in their search for an answer to the charge of police brutality. Philadel- phia, Detroit, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, and Washington, D.C., to name a few, have standard procedures set up to handle in- vestigation of any charges of brutality that may be made against the members of their departments. Philadelphia has adopted a policy of an "all civilian" review board, while others believe that the beat approach to the problem is through an "all police" board or a combination of the two, a "civilian-police" committee. Each of the plans has some merit, and as a result of their diligent search for the right way progress is being made. Washington, D.C., has a method of han- dling complaints of police brutality that, at this distance, looks pretty good. In the vernacular, it is "put up or shut up." Trans- lated into more acceptable language it sim- ply means that if you have a legitimate com- plaint against a police officer and wish to press the charge you must file a sworn affi- davit. In 1964, as a result of this policy, 11 complaints were filed with the review board. Of the 11 officers charged, the com- plaint against 2 was dropped before it reached the board, 2 policemen were found innocent and 7 were found guilty. No whitewash there, according to those statistics, at least. Until the millenium is reached and the world becomes completely civilized we need police to protect us from ourselves, and from each other. It is a thankless, nasty job at best, usually underpaid and often maligned by disgruntled citizens who have a personal "beef" against an individual officer. Under conditions such as these, the police deserve all of the support that we can give them. We must recognize their shortcom- ings, hold them responsible for their actions, but make them aware of the fact that we, the civilians, will guard their right to the same principle that we cherish, to be con- sidered Innocent until proven guilty. Statement on Behalf of Bernard L. Boutin EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. J. OLIVA HUOT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Friday, October 22,1965 , Mr. HUOT. Mr. Speaker; 2 weeks ago President Johnson nominated Mr. Bern- ard L. Boutin to become the Deputy Di- rector of the Office of Economic Oppor- tunity, an extremely important and sensitive post in the war on poverty. The strongest testimony to Mr. Boutin's qualifications is the fact that the Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee did not require hearings before approving his nomination. For this reason, I was unable to testify on behalf of my long- time friend. I therefore place in the RECORD, the statement I had prepared on his behalf: Mr. Chairman, my name is J. OLIVA HUOT, Congressman from the 1st Congressional District of New Hampshire. It is a distinct privilege and honor for me to appear before the Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee in support of the nomination of my long-time friend, Bernard L. Boutin, as Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity. When I served on the school board in the city of Laconia, N.H., Bernard Boutin was the mayor. This gave me an excellent op- portunity to observe closely the outstanding administrative ability and selfless devotion to public service that are the hallmarks of this man. From the mayor of Laconia, Bernard Bou- tin was picked by the late President John F. Kennedy to become the Administrator of the General Services Administration. This was a remarkable jump?from mayor of a city of 15,000 to management of a billion- dollar agency. Yet, I have heard nothing but praise and admiration for the job he did?both from those who served under -him and those who were affected by the activities of GSA. More recently, as executive vice president of the National Association of Home Build- ers, his guidance and leadership significantly contributed to the passage of the housing bill of 1965 and the bill to establish the Department of Housing and Urban Affairs. Bernard Boutin is unquestionably qualified for this job. He is also unquestionably de- voted to service of his country and par- ticularly aware and sensitive to the acute human problems with which he will be dealing. The people of New Hampshire are justi- fiably proud of Bernard Boutin. I am proud of him and I know that as Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity the entire country will be equally proud. I urge speedy confirmation of this out- standing appointment. CONGRESSIONAL DIRECTORY The Public Printer, under the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing, may print for sale, at a price sufficient to reimburse the expenses of such printing, the current Con- gressional Directory. No sale shall be made on credit (U.S. Code, title 44, sec. 150, p. 1939). Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 22 /moved forttimgaRigf ..aezmuliaftwspoos0005-4 ? ? ? ? .? ? ,? ? ? Therefore, I am delighted to insert in the RECORD the following official state- ment by Gov. John Dempsey: CONNECTICUT TRIBUTE TO SAMUEL 17, PRYOR, Samuel P. Pryor, Jr., of Greenwich, one of Connecticut's most distinguished citizens, is known throughout the world both for his prominence in the?aviation Industry and for great humanitarian service to' his fellowmen. Now that he is retiring after many years of outstanding service as an official of Pan American World Airways, it Is fitting that we accord due recognition to Sam Pryor and pay him the tribute he so justly deserves. Men and women in all walks of- life, in cities in virtually all the countries of the world, know Sam Pryor as a leading citizen of the State of Connecticut. In two wars in which our Natioi has been ,involved, fighting for the preservation of our way of life and for the principles of freedom and justice, Sam Pryor has rendered con- spicuous and highly important service. Beyond all this, moreover, Sam Pryor has been a real friend to countless numbers of people. Appeals for assistance in any cause benefiting mankind always have received from him a ready response. For all of these reasons, and because he Is a man In whom we of Connecticut take Much pride, we salute Samuel F. Pryor, Jr., both as a great citizen of our State and as a truly great American. - ATOILN DEMPSEY, ' Governor. Everybody in the Club EXTENSION OF REMARKS or -HON. J ARTHUR YOUNGER or mtroaNra TBE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, October 20, .1965 .Mr. YOUNGER. Mr. Speaker, Col- umnist Lucius Beebe, in his article pub- lished in the San Francisco Chronicle, on October 19, gives a very vivid de- scription of the "Great Society," in which he emphasizes the ultimate result of such a sociOy as now contemplated by the administration, Iis column fol- lows: Evnaysorox uns CL,US (By Lucius Beebe) When the American scheme of things, al- ready factually bankrupted by a long suc- cession of giveaway administrations and now steering a collision course with absolute col- lapse, achieves the end fOr which its poli- ticians have headed it: a society of con- sumers with no producers and no incentive to produce, the startling thing will, to the historical perception, be the equanimity and good cheer with which a once great people approached their own dissolution. Other ,civifizations jaa,ve gone down, most Of them fighting. But it took the Roman Empire a full thousand years to be liquidated and even the British, grapire, wantonly de- stroyed within the memory of living genera- tions, didn't liquidate itself without an argu- ment. The United States is ?going down the drain of _history with complete equanimity and in a pletbora_of Idiot slogans. Some of them ikettia,so-c11g,. rights are so alaunclantly meaningless since the goals and aims they envisioned were already in universal practice and availability as to be merely patently spurious. But "the Great Seciety," which if it is only fraction- ally achieved will spell the social and eco-, nOrnic engl of the United States as a COM.- + 1 ponent of organized world power, is fraught with persuasive mendacity. The basic philosophy of President John- son's ideal is, of course, the purchase for material considerations of the perpetuity in office of the Democratic looters of the Amer- ican economy. Its belief is that abundant and rich rewards of every sort, not merely the opportunity for their achievement, should be made available to absolutely everybody with no regard for his own invest- ment of labor, intelligence or responsibility. In other words everybody is going to be a member of the country club set without the troublesome bother of lifting a finger to deserve it. This is what President John- son means by the Great Society. Just who, in this benevolent scheme of immortality for the Democratic Party, is going to produce the material abundance on which the vision is predicated doesn't bother the Presidential mentality. A single monolithic electorate of 200 million voters all supporting the straight Democratic ticket on the basis of the cash favors of the administration is all that concerns the planners in Washing- ton. paving already destroyed the value of money, they now propose the destruction of competition and a scheme of economic and social rewards that has hitherto been based on the individual investment of work and Intelligence. The peculiar ambivalence of the Presi- dential aims is apparent when you consid- er that, on the one hand the administration makes a valiant pretense of creating jobs for everybody while on the other hand prom- ising that, job or no job, everybody is go- ing to belong to the country club and have five cars in the garage. Why then a job at all? That the intelligence of the American people has been so eroded with soft lying and political blandishments as to seriously accept such a scheme of things as not only possible but actually desirable is not a flat- tering commentary on the collective Ameri- can mind. Most of us are available to flat- tery and large numbers of people are avail- able to systematic delusions and the grand scale Of mendacity made possible by con- temporary government and communications, but to accept without batting an eye the proposition that the machinery of society is going to continue indefinitely with every- body a consumer and nobody on the pro- ducing end is not rational. In actual fact it contributes materially to the theory in some circles that entire nations can become mentally unbalanced, usually advanced to explain the conduct of Nazi Germany. Nothing in history suggests that some- thing 'for nothing is a workable social or economic hypothesis. The erosion of com- petition and destruction of a system of re- wards is almost immediately fatal to the society that embraces such quackery. Even the Russians are daily becoming more aware of the circumstance, having learned it the hard way. For some decades Commu- nist Russia tried living on slogans, even as President Johnson would have us all do. It was found not to be a satisfactory diet. Mapping the Ocean Floor EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. HASTINGS KEITH OF MASSACHUSETTS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, October 20, 1965 Mr. KEITH. Mr. Speaker, the fine public information offices?and the very talented people who work in them?am A5947 one of the Navy's greatest assets. Navy information officers are dedicated men who work quietly, modestly, and effi- ciently, making every effort to draw at- tention to what they are publicizing and yet skillfully avoiding the temptation to draw themselves into the spotlight. One outstanding example of such a topnotch operation is the Naval Ocean- ographic Office Public Information Sec- tion. Its Deputy Director, Bob Niblock, is a good writer and an outstanding pub- lic information man. Following is one of many instances of the very fine job the public informa- tion section is doing for the Naval Ocean- ographic Office. I am proud to include in the RECORD this very interesting article written by Bob Niblock about the ex- citing work the Navy is doing in mapping the ocean floor. Chartmaking of the three-dimensional ocean is a very important part of the modern Navy's role. For without an un- derstanding of its operating environment the Navy would be at a great loss. The article follows: 1From the Washington (D.C.) Post, Oct. 17, 19651 NAVY IS MAPPING THE OCEAN FLOOR An accelerated U.S. Navy effort to learn more about the ocean environment in which its ships and submarines operate has been a prime moving force for some exciting new programs of research and exploration in recent years. , Research ships now operate in all parts of the world gathering information for a three- dimensional picture of the ocean. Vehicles to explore the greatest depths are being designed and built and successful experi- ments point to the day when men may live and work in the sea for extended periods. Based on the current growth rate, oceanog- raphy?the science of the seas?is a career of the future. An organization which has undergone major changes because of the current push is the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (form- erly the U.S. Naval Hydrographic Office) at Suitland, Md. Commanded by aptly named Rear Adm. Odale D. Waters, its once modest program has sprouted into a three-department under- taking involving more than 700 men and women. Oceanographers from the Suitland office range the globe studying everything from the drift of Arctic ice floes to the tempera- ture variation and distribution of Gulf Stream sealife. All programs are directed primarily toward bettering -the defense capa- bility of the U.S. Navy. But they also assist dozens of nonmilitary activities, from deep- sea fishing to long-range weather forecasting. Many of the Oceanographic Office's proj- ects have a distinctly pioneering flavor. Like the one carried out in a deep section of the Atlantic near Nassau, known as the Tongue of the Ocean. There the Navy's Bureau of Ships is de- veloping a facility called the Atlantic Under- water Test and Evaluation Center. When completed, it will provide a deep ocean test range for submarines, surface ships and their weapons systems. The Oceanographic Office was asked to draw a picture of this 3,000-square-mile ocean test tank. In researching the area, a two-man sub- marine was used to survey the steep lime- stone cliff which surrounds Andros Island, largest of the Bahama Islands, and extends underwater for more than 600 feet. A four-man team of divers and scientists was sent from the Oceanographic Office. Washington Oceanographer Roswell F. Busby headed the group which included Chester Bright of La Plata Md a veteran Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 ? A5948 Approved teNtenslia92y9ata-RDFAVffielffl000500019ppollr 22, 1965 Navy diver and underwater photagrapher, Oceanographer Gilbert Ruggles, of ()ion Hill, Md., and Scientific Technician Andres Prune, of Suitland, Md., who was a leader of the Cuban underwater demolition team during the Bay of Pigs operation. A skilled artist, he produced detailed sketches of the reef after dives in the Cubmarine. During descents in the 22-fOot vessel, Busby could look through any of 17 plexi- glass portholes as he made his scientific ob- servations on a portable tape recorder, There was voice communication between the sub and surface tending vessel and at one point during the hour-long first dive Busby de- scribed coral formations looking like "bou- qUets of telephone poles." Bright made the second dive. Using movie and still cameras, he made his photo docu- mentation as the sub cruised downward along the cliff. On each dive, they descended' to 600 feet. High winds and rough seas canceled out 3 days of operations, but in nine dives the team covered most of the critical sites in the AUTEC area. They returned with valuable data, photo- graphs and sketches, which are now being used to draw up plans for cable laying operations. There were other bonuses from the under- taking, according to Busby. Although their mission was applied research, the team saw and photographed an underwater forma- tion which had been theorized but seldom Seen. On the face of the escarpment about 200 feet underwater, they discovered a shelf cut into the coral which helped to docu- ment the fact that the levels of the sea were much lower at one time, since this kind of shelf is most likely to have been cut by intertidal erosion centuries before. In addition, said Busby, "we learned a lot about working with small, deep-diving re- search submarines and about their potential as a useful research and survey tool." The 50th Anniversary?U.S*. Marine Corps Reserve ? EXTENSION OF REMARKS Os, HON. CLARK W. THOMPSON OF TEXAS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, October 20, 1965 Today, more than at any other time in its history, the Marine Corps Reserve stands equipped, trained, and ready to answer the call of its country to defend once again that freedom which has been won by so costly a sacrifice. In 1916, at the urging of the then Sec- retary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Maj. Gen. Commandant George Barnett, the Congress passed "An act making ap- propriations for naval service for the fis- cal year ending June 30, 1917, and for other purposes." One of the other pur- poses was to set forth provisions regard- ing a Marine Corps Reserve. President Woodrow Wilson signed the act into law on August 29, 1916, and Secretary Daniels promptly issued Navy Department Gen- eral Order No. 131 on August 31, 1916, which contained the following state- ment: A U.S. Marine Corps Reserve to be a con- stituent part of the Marine Corps and in ad- dition to the authorized strength thereof, is hereby established. The first official strength report of the Marine Corps Reserve shows only 3 of- ficers and 32 enlisted men as of April 1, 1917. From that small beginning, how- ever, the reserve grew to 6,467 in World War land to a peak strength of 357,417 during World War II. At the present time, the Marine Corps Reserve numbers 141,000, of which 7,000 are now on active duty, 100,190 are in Ready Reserve, and the remaining 33,810 are in Standby Re- serve or retired. The Marine Corps has always claimed the proud distinction of being ready to fight for its country whenever and wher- ever needed, and the Reserve has stood ready to back up that claim, and it con- tinues to do so today. I think it is en- tirely fitting that we should honor such an organization. Two Hundred Panamanians Trained in uba for Isthmian Subversion Mr. THOMPSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, August 29, 1966, will mark the 50th anniversary of the formal establish- ment of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Yesterday I introduced a bill calling on the Postmaster General to issue a stamp at the appropriate time next year to commemorate this highly significant event in the history of a great organiza- tion?an event which is equally great and significant in the history of the United States and in the struggle of all free peo- ple to defend freedom with life's blood or with life itself if need be. The U.S. Marine Corps has written on the pages of history of this Nation feats of dedication and heroism unsurpassed In the annals of man?and the citizen- marine has shed his blood and offered up his life side by side with the regulars on every beachhead and in every battle from Chateau Thierry to Iwo Jima to Vietnam. EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. DANIEL J. FLOOD OF PENNSYLVANIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, October 20, 1965 Mr. FLOOD. Mr. Speaker, in a num- ber of addresses before this body, I have ?described the Panama Canal as a key target for communistic revolutionary conquest and vigorously opposed the em- ployment of alien Panamanians in se- curity positions, especially on the Canal Zone police force. Recent information from the isthmus is that more than 200 Panamanians have been trained in Red Cuba in preparation for aggressive subversive activities against Latin America. In order that the Congress and the people of our country may be informed on this matter, I quote a news story from a well-known and respected isthmian newspaper: [From the Panama (11.P.) Star & Herald, Sept. 28, 1965] TWO HUNDRED TRAINED IN CUBA FOR SUBVER- SION HERE?EXILE TELLS OF PLANS More than 200 Panamanians have been trained in subversion in Communist Cuba in preparation for their part in Panama of an overall Communist aggression plan against Latin America, a handless former diplomat of the Castro regime said in a news con- ference yesterday. He is Odon Alvarez de la Campa, 45, who until March of this year was minister coun- selor of Castro's embassy in Madrid, Spain. He has joined the anti-Castro movement in exile. He lost both hands while engaged in sabotage work for_Castro's underground army in the fight against the Batista regime. Prior to being assigned to Madrid, he had served as deputy chief of the Castro police. Alvarez de la Campa said he learned of the Cuban plan of aggression against the Latin American nations at a meeting he at- tended in Paris in January of 1965. This meeting, held in the Cuban Embassy in Paris, was presided by Ernesto (Che) Gue- vara, the third-ranking man in the Cuban Communist hierarchy. Students .from all Latin American coun- tries who had attended a Communist con- gress in Warsaw, Poland, attended the meet- ing, 'Alvarez de la Camps declared. Guevara, the former diplomat said, told the . students of the decisions reached at a congress of Latin American Communist Parties held in Havana in November 1964, and urged them to return quickly to their countries in order to intensify the subversion plans. Guevara, according to Alvarez de la Campa, was concerned by the failure of pro- Castro guerrillas to stop elections in Vene- zuela and to take over in Brazil, then gov- erned by Joao Goulart. "I have been inside the training camp in Cuba," Alverez de la Campa said. "Not only are the latest weapons employed there, but the most modern tactics of subversion are taught. There are not only Cuban but Chinese, Russian, and Vietnamese instruc- tors." Alvarez de la Campa said that because of his familiarity with the pattern of Com- munist infiltration from Cuba, he is certain that arms have been cached already in Pan- ama for future Use. - He said Castro agents move in Europe through Prague, Paris, and Madrid and that the Spanish capital serves as the gateway to Latin America for agents assigned to the Western Hemisphere. In Latin America, Alvarez de la Campa ,added, the vital centers of Communist traffic are Mexico -City, Montevideo, Uruguay, and Santiago, Chile. In these cities, he reported, false travel documentation is -provided for Communist agents. He said agents trained in Cuba infiltrate government, labor, and student organizations and their strategy is' to capitalize on social conditions in each country in order to carry out propaganda, agitation, and terrorism, and bring about armed conflict. Cuba's campaign of penetration and sub- version in Latin American countries has been intensified in recent months, according to Alvarez de la Campa.. He said events in Peru, Guatemala, Venezuela and other coun- tries should not be regarded as isolated out-. breaks, but as part of an overall hemisphere campaign. This subversion, he declared, is aided by both Russia and Communist China. The ideological split between the two Red giants has not been carried into-Cuba, he explained, and the Castro regime receives economic and military aid from both Communist powers. Alvarez de la Campa said he believes Guevara, whose disappearance from the pub- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 . I Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 A6094 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX Otepka, taking advantage of the reor- ganization of the file room, of which Norpel had charge, discovered something curious. A number of clearances for high appointees had been predated to the time of their hir- ing. They had been put at once on the pay- roll without any investigation into their background. Inquiry quickly showed that sOrne had very dubious or even adverse rec- bras. When. news Of this spread through the Department, a number of those employed de- cided they did not want a Government job after all, Orders Came down that Norpel would be more usefill away from the files, and they Were remeved froM. Otepka's jurisdiction. Norpel was set to work on special clearances. Simultaneously, Boswell transferred some of the functions Of the evaluations division to his own executive office, including the files. They were now safe from probing security Men. HERE Is vialEUE SEILLE ENTERS THE PICTURE On April 16, 1962, John F. Reilly, who had been a senior lawyer for the Federal Com- munications Commission, was brought in to succeed Boswell. Congressional testimony re- vealed that his job was to "get Otepka." A stratagem was thought up to make this easy. Otepka was offered a 10-months' course in the National War College. Otepka surprised by this bounty, found out that he was not to be returned to the Security section, so he said, "No, thank you." David Belisle was brought from the Na- tional Security Agency as Deputy Director, Otepka's old post. He had supervision over Otepka's evaluation division, as well as the moribund special project. Obviously, a squeezeplay was being attempted against Otepka, and while technically he retained his old status, actually he was being down- graded. Anything that came from the Otepka office now was sure to meet objection, if only for a "t" not crossed, while the top was dis- regarding and violating actual personnel security procedures, promulgated by the White House and sanctioned by Congress as Executive Order 1040. This is still the basic regulation. A flood of waivers from the top circumvented Clearances. Civil Service in December 1962 resurrected the Wieland case by sending to the State Department new evidence that was developed after the Senate Internal Security Subcom- rnitte's exploration into the fall of Cuba. This naturally went to Otepka, who assigned it to the old special project group. Reilly Called for the special Wieland file almost at once, and this was the last seen of it until May 1963. No work had been done on it. Harry M. Hite immediately was assigned to it. Norpel and his security associates began a departmentwide search for documents re- lating to the new data. Reports spread in the Department that they were hitting pay dirt. The boom was lowered again. This time it dropped right through the hull. The evaluation division phones were tapped by orders that came though Reilly. A futile effort was made to attach microphones in the offices. 'The, classified trash that was dis- carded daily into burn bags, to go into the furnace, was diverted and pored over mi- nutely. Surveillance of Otepka's selectees was begun. Officers and secretaries in con- tiguous security areas were persuaded to act as informants on all movements of the group, to report what then Men said, and to assess their intent and actions. `04.11411T,?23., 19.03,_a raid took place of the Qr,pka premises, indistinguishable from any ra d that_might have 'Wren place of a nar- Cates ..ring or even a Red espionage ring. At 11:50 ani,, Mrs. Evnice Powers, Otepka's per- sonal seereterY, was called by Reilly and sent to a different office for a spurious rush job. At 11.53 a..rn, Billy N. Hughes was summoned 4,11tI hanciedhis tranger to routine investiga- tion in a Washington field office. Reilly sug- gested he go to lunch at once instead of re- turning to his old office. At 11:56 a.m., Norpel was summoned and likewise was handed the same transfer orders, and he, too, was told, "There's no need for you to report back to your office; go out to lunch, and then report to your new office." At the stroke of noon, Otepka, having been similarly summoned, walked into Reilly's of- fice. All this time, Belisle hovered over the scene, as a bodyguard might have done. Otepka was given an obviously make-work assignment apart from his old staff. He was banished to a cubbyhole to "write a hand- book on security operations." He returned to his office to find Mrs. Powers, Hughes, and Norpel there. They were experienced enough in surrptitious and illegal techniques to know there was something phony about this. And there was. THREE OFFICES?NOT ONE?RAIDED AT ONCE The public impression, from what has been published, is that Otepka's office alone was summarily entered and searched. Actually, a raiding party simultaneously at about 12:10 p.m. entered the office of Otepka, the adjoining separate office of Mrs. Powers, and farther down the hallway, the combined of- fices of Norpel and Hughes. While others watched, wondering what crime had been committed, Reilly superintended the seizure of all safes and the immediate changing of all combinations on the locks. All records and file material were removed from the desks. Even the personal belongings of the exiled staff were impounded, and could be obtained only later under the surveillance of a guard. If only such energy could be focused on our Communist enemies. Norpel worked on routine investigations of job applicants, the sort of thing he had cut his teeth on in the FBI in 1951. Hughes shortly after was pressed into accepting a permanent assignment as a field agent in Memphis, Tenn. In January 1964, Norpel made his first appearance as a witness before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee, on instructions relayed through his superior. Intermittently, for the past several years, the subcommittee had been calling witnesses from the security branch, on the basis of information sent it from numerous alarmed sources. Following his testimony, Norpel was asked if he was satisfied with his assignment, and when he replied in the negative, was trans- ferred back to the evaluations division. Ap- parently, anywhere they went, this group in- sisted on doing a thorough job. On March 15, 1964, the old group, except Hughes was re- assembled, along with Howard J. Shea, an old State Department hand. and Edwin A. Burkhardt, and was reconstituted as an un- defined section of the Bureau of Inter- American Affairs. They were supposed to be engaged in some supersensitive task. But the required files and facilities were kept from them. They twiddled their thumbs, chafing and protesting over the inaction. Loughton settled for a consular assignment abroad. Gardner went upstairs. Norpel was placed in charge. He kept in- sisting on something to do, and continued being fed a line about the super-secretness of it all. He did his usual probing, nonethe- less, and came up with what he surmised they should have been seeking. His secu- rity background led him to the right trail. ThIS was evident when the same boom came down. Out of the administration's wood- work came the same influences that divert or paralyze any government project once it threatens to really hurt the Communists. Norpel was ordered to El Paso, Tex., where there never had been a State Department of- fice. Shea was ordered to Denver, Colo. Hite and Burkhardt were left behind, with the same ambiguous non-assignment, where October 22, 1965 they still are in virtual quarantine. Otepka on April 30, 1964 was told to delay his previ- ous meaningless task, and take on a new one, reading the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD in order to record the views of legislators on security matters. Norpel and Shea, of course, did not accept punitive exile, and have been dropped from the payroll, and are considered discharged. Now it is up to the public, Con- gress and the press. The Otepka and the Norpel cases, and those of the others, must not be separated. Jack Foisie EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. OLIN E. TEAGUE OF lp-r-As IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Friday, October 22, 1965 Mr. TEAGUE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, the October l965 edition of the magazine Army published by the Association of the U.S. Army contains an article written by Jack Foisie of the Los Angeles Times on the war in Vietnam, and the men who are fighting it. It is entitled "My Third War" and I commend it to all those in this body who have seen service in mili- tary combat: ME THIRD WAR (By Jack Foisie) SAIGON.?When my "friends and neighbors" of the draft board selected me for a year of military training back in mid-1941, I hated the thought of being in the Army. Even after Pearl Harbor, and the year became "for the duration" and learning to shoot took on purpose, I remained at heart a civilian. Now I am in Vietnam?in my third war. Of course, I am no longer a soldier. / am a correspondent. I also was a correspondent during the Korean war. And midway through World War II, I became an Army combat correspondent. But in uniform or out, I have remained a civilian, and at least in the last two conflicts I have?I fear?sometimes gloried in the independence enjoyed by a correspondent even when among the military. Yet if I ever really hated military life (and there were days in basic training when I thought I did), I hate the Army no longer. Nor any other of the Armed Forces. A career as a military reporter, spanning 2 decades, has been time enough for my prejudices to wear away. This is not to suggest that in 1941 I was a pacifist. But neither was I a fired-up patriot. Although just beginning in journal- ism, I had already taken on a speck of the cynicism that is an occupational disease (and some would say, a necessity) in our business. And so I believed that the war then con- fined to Europe was not our affair; that much of the discipline of the military was needless harassment, and that officers as well as sergeants were narrow thinkers and had chosen the military as a career because they were people who really couldn't cut the mus- tard in civilian life. I am still a cynic?particularly here in Vietnam. But I harbor no such general con- demnation of men in uniform here, or any- where else in the world where, in past years, I have been associated with professional soldiers, airmen, sailors, marines. I remember a November day at Fort Knox, 21 years ago, when I had rebellious thoughts. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26_: CIA-RDP6M1)0446R000500080005- A60934 0-c6be; 22, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDtx will risk turning public opinion in this country against the rescue effort. In this latter regard, members of the exile community must realize that there is al- ready a large and legitimate segment of pub- lic opinion in the United States which doubts the wisdom of admitting more Cuban refu- gees on a mass basis. Gov. Haydon Burns, of Florida has expressed his concern that an additional flow of Cuban nationals into this State will add to economic problems, spe- cifically in the area of employment. Other critics foresee an increased burden on State and national welfare programs since many of the escapees will arrive with the clothes on their backs as their only personal possessions, and no immediate job prospects. Such fears are not without justification. We are not surprised that Castro is anxious to create these problems for the United States But we would be surprised if members of the Cuban exile community cooperated, wittingly or unwittingly, in aiding him in this cause. A disorderly reply to the Castro challenge would create the sort of chaos here which already exists in Cuba. We don't want that. On the other hand, it is extremely impor- tant that those who seek to take advantage of the Castro escape hatch have an oppor- tunity to do so. Naturally, we would prefer an internal revolution in Cuba which over- throws Castro completely. But his continu- ing control of the military apparatus seems to rule that out. His opponents have neither the arms nor the organization to displace him. Rather than see these people rounded up Hungarian-style and moved to some Cuban Siberia, we would prefer that an efficient means of freeing them from Cuba be devel- oped and that a fair and intelligent resettle- ment program be organized once they are out of communism's clutches. Of course, it would be an error to bring more refugees to this country only to plunge them into a cesspool of poverty and psycho- logical depression. But isn't that what the Ideological war with communism is all about? We must prove that we can face problems such as these and solve them with- out damaging our own strong socioeconomic system or simply moving victims of com- munism from one bad situation to another. This is not a job for amateurs. It is not a task to be carried out alone by emotion- struck exiles already in the United States. If Castro is truly determined to open the doors of his country to those desirous of leaving, the exodus must be handled wisely and in context with existing U.S. policies. If it is successful and so complete that we may be relatively sure only pro-Castro ele- ments remain on the island, then it will be far easier from the standpoint of conscience to increase economic pressure on Cuba; to blockade the island and to wage psychologi- cal and physical warfare against Castroisrn. But that is for the future. Our concern now is with the present and with the best possible means of taking advantage of the latest strange and wonderful twist in Castro's reasoning. The Norpel Case EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. H. R. GROSS OF IOWA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Friday, October 22, 1965 Mr. GROSS. Mr. Speaker, in the pub- lication Tactics, of the date of Septem- ber 20, 1965, is an article by Mr. Edward Hunt calling attention to the case of Mr. John R. Norpel, Jr., who has been the victim of unwarranted punishment by officials in the State Department be- cause of his support of Otto F. Otepka. Norpel is being punished because of his honesty and loyalty, not only to Otto Otepka but to his country. It is incred- ible that those entrusted with the proper conduct of the State Department have been permitted to make a mockery of the civil service which was designed to protect efficient, honest, and loyal em- ployees of the Federal Government. The article by Edward Hunt follows: BACKGROUND ON OTEPKA'S DEFENDERS: STUDY PAPER ON NOR,PEL CASE An integral, although separated part of the Otepka case is the Norpel case. Actually, it also might be called the Shea case, the Hite case, the Hughes, or the Burkhardt case. The issue in the Norpel case is a fundamen- tal one by itself, with its own significance in the maintenance of freedom. If Otto F. Otepka were to be restored to his post in the State Department, and his rights as a citizen upheld, it would be a pyrrhic victory if Norpel and the others were not likewise vindicated. The basic issue in the Otepka case is the right of Senators and Congressmen to obtain correct information from any source as guid- ance in drafting laws and for policy guidance. The other side of the identical coin is the right of the American citizen, in or out of government, to contact or be contacted by his Representative in Congress. Surely it does not require any book learn- ing to know that it is impossible for any legislator to write intelligent laws, if when he asks a question of a government employee or office holder, he is led astray, misinformed, or lied to. Free society could not exist with- out this right of his being fully protected. The issue in the case of John R. Norpel Jr., is a person's right, surely in government, not to be penalized or discharged when his superior falls from favor or is fired, or to be forced to repudiate and betray him in order to get on the right side of his new boss. Every American has read about the dismis- sal or disgrace of some official in Soviet Rus- sia, and how everyone related personally or professionally to him was purged, as well. What American while reading this has not felt a self-satisfied glow of satisfaction that this could not happen in the United States? Well, it has happened to Norpel, and to all these others. Surely it does not require any book learn- ing to know that we cannot expect the in- terests of the United States to be uppermost in the mind of any government employee or functionary if he knows that if he does not play ball with the top, and stand ready at any time to doublecross or knife anyone who receives the displeasure of the top, he will be tossed to the wolves, and the public not give a damn, the Congress look the other way, and the press be closed to him. This is haw it is under despotism, of course. What we have not realized, of course, is that With the best will in the world, it is impos- sible to institute a news management pro- cedure, allowing officials to decide when they believe it convenient to Ile to the public, press, and Congress, and to insist on a policy of one voice in government, without gradu- ally building up a dictatorship, with the in- evitable police state required to enforce it. This is modern despotism. OUR SMUGNESS IS ALLOWING THIS TO HAPPEN This reminder should be brought to the attention of every man or Woman in govern- ment, whether in the White House or a city hall. It should be brought to the attention of every professor of political science, and should be digested by every newspaper re- porter-and voter. The Otepka case and the Norpel case are the symbols of these two fundamental issues. We have been so con- fident that such despotic and unfair proce- dure could not happen to us that we fail to recognize these things when they occur under our noses. They are given such dis- sembling names as institutional loyalty, which replaces patriotism. Norpel, who is married and has two daughters, is cleancut in looks and character. Although only 40 last August 6, he has given half his years to patriotic work, from the U.S. Army to the FBI, to the State Depart- ment. His is the sort of outlook and career that those bent on softening up the United States seek to corrupt. ' He even was an Eagle Scout. But he can meet eggheads on their own ground. He has his B.A., studied law, is a member of Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity and Alpha Epsilon national honor- ary society, and has been a teacher in Phila- delphia and in the FBI. His FBI work ranged from specialization in investigative photography to penetration of Communist underground activities to developing com- plex espionage cases. He was highly com- mended by J. Edgar Hoover in the designing of an investigative device for security tasks, and Hoover also commended him on other occasions in connection with security opera- tions. Otto Otepka brought him into the State Department in July 1961 to work on a special project suddenly ordered for an exhaustive review of the security backgrounds of all at officer level. Preliminary studies were being made by two other security evaluators, Harry M. Hith and Billy N. Hughes. Otepka as Deputy Director of the Security Office, 'also brought in as evaluators, Raymond A. Loughton from the Defense Department, who was upset over being overruled regard- ing Adam Yarmolinsky, and Francis V. Gardner, recently with FBI. Howard J. Shea at this time was an investigative supervisor under Otepka. Edwin A. Burkhardt, evalua- tor, had been brought over previously from the Civil Service Commission by Otepka, who also had been connected with the Commis- sion. The project was begun under the instruc- tions of William 0. Boswell shortly after this career Foreign Service officer became Director of the Office of Security. His role was to eliminate the Scott McLeod image. The routine work of the office proceeded, and in- cluded the William A. Wieland case, which Otepka completed in August 1961, and passed it directy to Roger Jones, who re- cently had become Deputy Under Secretary for Administration. Boswell simply refused to have anything to do with it, and the ill- fated Salvatore Bontempo, given a political plum as administrator of the Bureau of Se- curity and Consular Affairs, was out of the picture. He resigned after a controversial 6 months, during which Congress and the press asked what a man of his total lack of experience was doing in such an office. Nor- pel during this period was trying to retrieve the voluminous, scattered information in State Department files that were hidden all over the place. FIRST BACKLASH IS REDUCTION IN FORCE Obviously the team that was assembled was actually digging into the records. This obviously never had been intended. The ex- pectation was that Otepka would be mature enough to know his men were supposed only to be going through the motions. The boom was dropped. Otepka was informed of a sud- den need for a reduction in force. His post and -24 other security jobs were abolished. Otepka now was made chief of the Division of Evaluations, taking his project staff with him. Norpel went along. They now had to handle all the routine cases of applicants, and with a greatly reduced total staff, a big backlog built up. Without anyone having to say a word, the special project was pushed to the side for lack of time. Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A'602 Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 ral CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX October 22, 1965 ? Many Cubans relocated elsewhere have re- turned to Miami. The social and economic impact on Miami of thousands of additional Cuban refugees obviously could be severe, if the orderly in- flux approVed by President Johnson were not observed. ' One would guess that this was in the mind of the sly, whiskered dictator when he re- versed usual Communist tactics and offered to ,remove, rather than erect, barriers to emigration. It is' a severe indictment of the Castro Communist regime that thousands of Cubans are eager to vote by boat against it, as so many thousands of East Germans voted by foot against their rulers until the Berlin wall was erected. But, by opening the door, Castro gets rid' of many countrymen who do not support him and lessens the drain on Cuba's skimpy economy. If the United States should turn an armada of 'refugee S away because they are not following an orderly process orimmigra- tion, Castro would have ammunition for propaganda branding this country as in- humane and hypocritical. Cubans already here understandably would be upset if their relatives Were not admitted freely by the U.S. Government, after Castro hacrset them free. Castro may not be as loony aS he appears. There's probably a cynical grin behind the beard. [From the Lincoln Evening Journal and Ne- braska State Journal, Oct. 14, 1965] CASTRO'S BOMBSHELL Recently Fidel Castro began giving one of his long rambling talks which covered every- thing from poverty to bureaucrats. Then he dropped a bombshell, saying that any Cuban With relatiVes in the United States could leave the island after October 10. President Lyndon Johnson reciprocated by Saying they would be welcomed. Then the stampede was on. Everyone from diplomats down to the Cuban in the street is searching for the reasons for Castro's new open door policy. One thing is certain, many Cubans don't trust the Cuban dictator and are making a mad dash to get out while the leaving is pos- sible. Cuban exiles in this country are aid- ing their friends and relatives despite the ?U.S. Government's plea for an orderly exit and the promise of safe transportation. This mass exodus should disillusion any remaining Castro admirers in Latin Ameri- ca,. It also has provided bath a challenge and a problem for the United States. The proximity of Florida places the bur- den on the southern part of that State. Flor- ida Gov. Haydon Burns proposed a four- point Federal program to prevent refugees being 'dumped in the Miami area for re- settlement and school officials there were told not to admit new wave Cuban refugee chil- dren to classes until Federal funds were avail- able for classrooms and teachers. There has also been grumbling in some labor groups about the added competition in the job markets. It seems evident that the Cliban Government is not going to cooperate in an orderly flow of refugees. ? The United States can absorb the refugees, but Florida cannot, without help. That help Should be forthcoming?quickly before the tempers rise in that State. Possibly it was Castro's plan to embarrass the United States, but this he should not be allowed to do. ? -President Johnson may have been impet- 'VOUS and perhaps the ground rules should have been laid before extending the welcome. But both Castro and the President have spoken. In international circles Castro's word means nothing but Uncle Sam's is re- spected. ' The 1:Tufted" States now must make the -"best of:a- difficult situation. It dare not dash 114-6 'Of englaved men and women. Cas- tro has also given-it an Opportunity for a great propaganda coup against the Commu- nist world. [From the Atlanta Journal, Oct. 14, 1965] CARING FOR CUBAN REFUGEES A number of agencies here are wisely start- ing work to care for a fraction of the Cuban refugees expected to come to this country in what promises to be a major exodus. It will be a welcome exodus. Like the tens of thousands before them, they will be fleeing from the cruel band of communism. For reasons not fully known Fidel Castro has said that he will let down the barriers to all who want to leave Cuba. Whatever the reasons it is a happy oppor- tunity for a brutalized people to make their way to freedom. Freedom for those who can leave, as it has been for practically all who have escaped before, logically lies in the United States. This country is not only the traditional haven for the oppressed but it has also held a burning anger against Castro and his fellow Communists and an abiding sym- pathy for the Cubans. As these refugees arrive it is the respon- sibility of the entire country to resettle them and start them in new lives. The Federal Government should lead the way. States and communities should follow through with their own arrangements. 'Miami has been all but swamped with the refugees. Other parts of Florida have been burdened with large numbers. This should not be, They are a national problem which should be the enthusiastic concern of all Americans. [From the Chicago Daily News, Oct. 16, 19651 CUBA'S NEW EXODUS It is for Fidel Castro to decide whether the exodus from Cuba will be confied to the dar- ing few skilled enough to venture the passage in sman boats or enlarged to number in the thousands. For reasons as unfathomable as his initial offer to let refugees leave his island prison, Castro has thus far indicated a willingness to cooperate with an orderly and larger depar- ture. Is Castro merely trying to get rid of "un- desirables"? Will he eventually demand a ransom, financial or political? Is he being prodded by his Soviet bosses to maks a con- ciliatory gesture? Whatever the answers, the Cuban refugees ought to be welcomed by Americans. They will be a temporary burden, especially to the Miami area, which has absorbed so many in the past. But their presence and their plight affords an opportunity for the United States to live up to its tradition as a haven for the oppressed. The opportunity is a national one, and Gov. Haydon Burns of Florida is right in asking other States to do their share. Fortunately, Chicago already has the mechanism for absorbing many more refu- gees. The Cardinal's Committee for the Spanish Speaking and the Cuban Associa- tion, which it supports, have integrated thousands with a minimum of public de- pendency. (The story is told elsewhere in today's paper by reporter Norman Glubok.) The doors of these organizations are now being crowded by refugee Cubans anxious to receive friends and relatives who might form part of a new exodus. Chicagoan should give them wholehearted support. [From the Boston Globe, Oct. 13, 19651 THE ROAD TO EXILE When Fidel Castro startled an audience at Havana a fortnight ago by announcing that anyone discontented with his regime could migrate to the United States, he posed sev- eral riddles. They remain unanswered. Was he referring only to those in Cuba who have relatives living in exile in this country? Or was his purpose broader? Was he merely reaching for an expedient to rid himself of leaders of the growing passive resistance movement among Cuba's peas- antry and workmen? Whatever his aims, was he ready to cooperate with the United States to facilitate an orderly exodus of the thousands who undoubtedly would like to accept his offer? President Johnson, taking note of Castro's proposal, was careful to emphasize that the United States will give first priority to Cubans having relatives in this country, and to political prisoners. But he indicated a broader policy: "Those wso seek refuge here will find it." Washington's efforts to obtain a rational working agreement with Havana are still bogged down. Castro's suggestion that he will manage matters as he sees fit doesn't help. As a result, while intermittent boat- loads of refugee Cubans turn up off Florida, our own Government faces a number of problems. Whether, as some estimate, 300,000 or more Cubans are preparing to seek freedom here, or (as is more likely) the realistic figure would be nearer 50,000, rigorous con- trol of admissions is of necessity part of U.S. policy. The immigration laws make that mandatory. Even when latitude is allowed for political asylum precautions are needed. This should not mean serious hardship for the fugitive Cubans who, in fact, can only benefit oy orderly procedures. Mean- time the problems created by the prospec- tive arrival of some 5,000 refugees a month need attention and farsighted planning. That was the scale of the influx prior to the Cuban missile crisis, when 350,000 Cubans fled abroad from Castro's tyranny and some 270.000 of them came here. Our Government has already spent about $190 million helping resettle and retrain these refugees, one-third of them in and around Miami. Private agencies have con- tributed a similar amount. Yet nearly 16,000 are still on relief. Clearly the $12 -million asked of Congress by the President to deal with the situation now developing is too modest. Neither Miami nor Florida's Dades County can absorb unaided. a new heavy influx of refugees. The problem obviously is Federal, not local. No true American will fail to welcome these unfortunates; but the wel- come will be the more beneficial to all, in- cluding the refugees, if backed by an ade- quate Federal economic and educational program. UNCLE DUDLEY. [From the Tampa (Fla.) Times, Oct. 11, , 1965] NOT A JOB FOR AMATEURS If the evacuation of refugees from Cuba is to be a success it is extremely important that Cuban exiles in the United States coop- erate fully with Government plans for han- dling this unusual Castro-approved exodus. In their anxiety to aid friends and rela- tives leave Cuba, Cubans already in the United States may defeat their purpose by rushing a small boat floatilla across the Florida Straits. First, the number of escapees picked up by small boats would be low compared to the total removed in an organized evacuation. Second, unless the rescue of these people from Castroism is orderly, there is a danger of injustice, accidents and error. One such "error" occurred over the weekend when exile operators of a refugee pick-up craft swapped gunfire with a Cuban militia patrol. Castro could use auch an incident to cancel his open-door order and take retaliatory measnres. against those would-be escapees who have identified themselves. Third, any rescue effort which is not tightly supervised by Governinent agencies Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 " Approved-P-oriketease 2003/09/26 -:-CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 October 22, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX A6091 the innate hospitality and friendliness of all Americans. The following editorials from across the country attest to the willingness and friendliness with which the whole Nation welcomes those who have the courage to flee from tyranny: [Prom the Miami Herald, Oct. 18, 19651 GUIDELINES FOR REFUGEES Once we khew a family whose elderly father grew ill but could not go to a nursing home for care. So he moved in with one of his sons. The others promised to help. Well, you know the story, Through the fault really of nobody at all, the one son became the sole support of the ailing father. South Florida would not equate its Cuban visitors with a sick old man but rather with an ailing freedom that somehow must be nursed back to robust good health. Yet it cannot perform that function if new and heavier burdens are laid upon it by the re- settlement in this area of large groups of exiles. It seems to us that Representative DANTE FASCELL framed the issue properly before the House the other day when he observed that "the Major burden is the ability of one area to take to its heart and absorb into its eco- nomic life, thousands more who flee tyranny." There is no reason the United States Gov- ernment cannot do this job with order and dispatch if it addresses itself seriously to the question as a metter vested with the national interest. Mr. FASCELL has suggested a number of guidelines. All of them are good. Some must be adopted. Here they are: 1. Entry should be limited to reuniting divided families and releasing political prisoners; beyond that the United States should not now go. 2. Miami should be only an entry and processing point and not a staging or reloca- tion center. 3. Transportation of refugees from Cuba should be at all times under the strict super- vision and control of, U.S. authorities. 4. Necessary personnel and equipment should be kept in the south Florida area to enforce the laws and to safeguard the secur- ity of the United States. 5. The United States must have final de- termination on who is admitted. 6. Refugees must be security screened and, if considered a security risk returned to Cuba. 7. The rate of entry of Cuban refugees into the United States should not exceed the rate of relocation. 8. No agreement should contain any terms or conditions which in any way could be interpreted as changing the position of the United States against Fidel Castro and his government. The United States must remain firm in its determination to rid the West- ern Hemisphere of communism and to allow ? the people of Cuba to restore a democratic government. This policy would commit Congress to a responsibility for as well as an understanding of the Cuban refugee problem. ? It would by no means close the door on refugees. Indeed, point 8 gives purpose to the reception of refugees beyond a humanitarian impulse. For if the United States is to help achieve a free Cuba it must of course be receptive to those who seek sanctuary. [From the Christian Science Monitor, Oct. 16, 1965] CUBAN REFUGEES Refugees from Fidel Castro's Cuba may soon be flooding into Florida at the pre- Cuban missile crisis rate of more than 1,000 a Week. The Cuban Premier's surprising an- nounceinent that anyone on the island who ? _ wants to leave might do so, together with , President Johnson's offer to accept all refu- gees, is a fascinating development. We have grown accustomed to conununism's iron cur- tain approach to the desire of its peoples to emigrate. There is speculation that Mr. Castro's mo- 'tives were both political and economic. He could rid the country of opponents of his regime and at the same time strengthen the hard-pressed economy by seizing their possessions. Mr. Johnson's motives were first of all hu- manitarian. From his point of view the exodus, moreover, may be considered a propa- ganda victory, illustrating to the world the dissatisfaction of many Cubans with life un- der Castro's communism. Whatever the motives of the two leaders, if the plan does actually materialize it will pose certain problems for the United States. There will have to be another crash program to absorb the refugees as well as long-range planning and effort to integrate them into the social and economic structure of the :country. It will demand the joint endeavor of private agencies and local, State, and Fed- eral governments. Many of the refugees have neither the language background nor the skills neces- sary to support themselves in the American economy. They axe bound to add to the Na- tion's unemployment and welfare problems. In some cases their presence may limit job opportunities for Negroes. Special educa- tional and job-training programs will cer- tainly be needed. And the Nation as a whole is going to have to find places for the new arrivals. Florida, and especially Miami, have borne heavy and disproportionate burdens. About one-third of the 270,000 refugees who have come since the Cuban revolution still live in Miami. When and if the new flood of refugees does come, both Government and private agencies should be ready with plans to locate them, insofar as possible, in areas of opportunity beyond the borders of Florida. [From the Washington Post, Oct. 5, 1965] WELCOMING CUBANS The administration is wise to hold Pre- mier Castro to his offer to let Cuban refugees come to the United States irrespective of technicalities. Whether or not Castro mis- understood President Johnson's suggestion that the International Red Cross assist with preparations, this country's expressed will- ingness to negotiate reasonable arrange- ments will serve the double purpose of re- affirming the traditional American haven for those in distress and of dramatizing any Castro attempt to renege. Federal help in resettling Cubans with relatives already here as well as political refugees should pre- vent too great a burden from falling on Florida. At the same time the administration's position would be even more impressive if it could take Castro up on his additional pro- posals?that Americans be allowed to travel to Cuba, that Cubans in this country be permitted to visit relatives in Cuba and re- turn, and that Cubans in Cuba be permitted , to visit relatives here and return. Such procedures are impossible now because Latin American countries have agreed to discourage travel to and from Cuba as a curb on subversion. The State Department has allowed journalists to visit Cuba but not others, and American passports are en- dorsed with a prohibition. Although restrictions of this sort cannot easily be ended, they still are of dubious principle. Restrictions on travel are ba- sically a totalitarian device. Even with the acknowledged security dangers and possibil- ity of propaganda facades, there is nothing like seeing for yourself to bring out essen- tial truths and encourage open societies. If there are to be barriers to free travel, let them come from the Communists. [From the Evening Star, Oct. 5, 1965] THE NEW EXILES The offer of unqualified refuge to Cubans who wish to leave the island gave a dramatic ring to the President's Ellis Island speech. In terms of national sentiment, even in terms of propaganda, it was the natural response to Castro's sudden decision to open the doors. But virtually unlimited immigration from Cuba creates a host of new problems for Florida and the city of Miami. Since 1959, Miami has been the West Berlin of the Cuban nightmare. More than 200,000 Cu- ban refugees have flowed into the city, most of them remaining there on temporary "parole" status. Miami, aided by State and Federal funds, has been a kind host. Refu- gee children attend the public schools. Jobless refugees go on the public-assistance roles immediately, although Florida resi- dents must live there for 5 years before receiving a dole. The exiles are allowed to hold jobs, and the result has been a serious rise in jobseekers in Dade County, particu- larly in unskilled categories. Some resettle- ment has been achieved. The majority of exiles hover in southeast Florida, where the climate and culture are their own, awaiting the day of return. Yet this very hope for an end to Ca,stroism argues for some sort of limitation an future immigration from the island. Castro's offer puts a foreboding seal of permanence on his revolution. It is a way of cleaning house and battening down the hatches. What he seems to be angling for, in effect, is a second Cuba set up on our own shores?a con- venient dumping ground for unemployables and malcontents. This may or may not be true. Castro may really wish to reopen channels of communication between the two nations. But given his muddled speeches, who can tell? The Cuban refugee has an unprecedented hold on the Nation's conscience. This was made clear in the President's response to Castro. And the Federal Government will doubtless take on more of the responsibility for feeding and resettling the exiles. What cannot be reckoned is the cumu- lative effect the new immigration will have on the exiles themeselves?on their morale, their hopes, their dreams of eventual re- turn. If the open-door plan goes through, Castro will have his safety valve. But the exiles will not, and their bitterness is bound to increase as problems of resettlement be- come more complicated. It is not a happy prospect, in the long run, for anyone in- volved?except perhaps for Castro himself. [From the Oregonian, Oct. 10, 1965] SLY CASTRO According to Cuban exiles in Miami, Fidel Castro apparently meant his recent state- ment that all Cubans who wished to join relatives in the United States would be free to do so. Castro not only has opened the door; he has stocked a small port with food and other provisions for his departing coun- trymen and has sent telegrams to exiles in Florida inviting them to come to Cuba by small boat to fetch their relatives. Already some small craft have made the voyage safely through waters which formerly were so closely guarded by Communist tor- pedo boats that they became known as "death corridor." Many Miami residents are worried that their city and State will be flooded by refugees before the UB. Govern- ment can arrange for their relocation throughout the country in an orderly man- ner. Of 244,000 alien Cubans already in the United States, more than a third live in the Miami area and almost half in Florida. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 22, :1965 The Soviets hit this critical stage in the late 1950's."" Page 98: "Everyone understands the prob- lem: According to one estimate by a leading Soviet mathematician, 60 percent of the country's potential industrial output is being wasted by inefficiencies in planning and ad- ministration." U.S. News & World Report, May 3, 1965: "The Communist system in most of the eastern European nations is falling apart. There Still is dictatorship but the totalitar- ian state is gone and communism as an ideol- ogy is dead in all satellites except Bulgaria." In sum, central planning for business and Industry just wouldn't work. The Russians, being human, followed their own self-inter- est and did things the easiest, rather than the best, way. And, as always when central planners have to defend themselves, for a long time they managed to use figures to cover, the faults. Finally in 1962 (a year after the Berlin wall spilled the beans, and Communist leadership, staring economic defeat in the face, became willing to listen to anyone) up popped a Russian liberal named Liber- ' man. (You must remember that, in Rus- sia, a liberal is against central planning.) A professor. He proposed a diabolical, ingenious new Soviet scheme, the Liberman plan. He called it "The plan, profits, and bo- nuses" (pretty nervy right there) and this was the idea: Liberman said the public knows what the public wants. Let each factory develop its own production targets, product designs, and selling techniques (fancy words for indi- vidual and company initiative) based on what it thinks the public will buy (West- erners would call this, "the economy of the marketplace"). The reward is profits for the factories and bonuses for the workers when they make goods that sell, and only when they sell, rather than on what some central planner directed factories to make and people to buy. (That's individual responsibility and oppor- tunity.) If this sounds like something that's been going on In the United States for a long tirne?a market-oriented, profit-motivated, economic system, guided by decentralized individual decisions, that's not remarkable. It is. Liberman had visited the West. He knew this would work. And Khrushchev had been In the West?he could see how well it worked. Lenin had said, "We'll even learn, if neces- sary, from the capitalists," and it sure was necessary, so they decided to try it out. In the spring of 1964, just before I heard about that newborn advertising agency, they be- gan to take steps. After 2 years of kicking Liberman's ideas around, while things got worse and worse, Ithrushchev held his breath and gave Liber- man the green light to try his plan in the galenent industry?men's suits. Let's quote again from the Huntley-Brinkley report, just 13 months later?NBC: Huntley-Brinkley Re- port, November 4, 1964: "The pioneer in the new profit system has been the suit factory, Bolshevichka. No more directives from the genius in the planning committee. Bol- shevichka fins orders from retail stores like QUM. That's all. But it's never been done before. The stores order what they think their customers want. Bolshevichka pro- duces it. The order is delivered to the store and the customers either buy it or they don't. If the merchandise doesn't move, the order Is cut or rescinded. Bolshevichka changes the model, 'cuts the price, or does what any producer Would do once he recognizes that laeAepends on Customers and that the cus- tomer frrigHt.- Since the new system began, ?not a S'ingtd 136IsheVichka suit has had to go into, storage PrOthiction is up. Profits are up. Which means more money for the work- CONGRESSIONAL' 'RECORD ? APPENDIX ers. Such euccess depends entirely on cus- tomer acceptance of their product, so the Bolshevichka workers have a basic profit in- centive to satisfy the customers' demand for quality." Incidentally?and this is important?this didn't work at first because the clothing fac- tory couldn't get satisfactory cloth from its suppliers, so Khrushchev pushed the new method onto them, too. There's no stop- ing this, you see. And if Professor Liber- man has his way, substantially all of the Russian economy will be based solely on profits, determined on the basis of goods actually sold at retail. The single best indi- cator of a firm's performance will be per- cent of profits on invested capital. (Sound familiar?) Well, Liberman is getting his way?fast. In the months since then, with the econo- mist Kosygin as Premier, the new scheme has been spreading rapidly. And, of course, we know that factory profits increase when customers are satisfied?through better service, quality, or price. So using profits to measure success in Russia will gradually im- prove the quality of all their production. In some fields this won't take long at all. In that clothing factory, for example, bonus payments doubled in 2 months as the quality and profits improved. In 6 months, the plant was running at full capacity as more and more customers' wanted the Bol- shevichka brand name in their suits. Ob- viously, they needed some competition. So, by January 1, 1965, 400 more apparel factories had been switched to the profit system. Since then, papers, magazines, and TV have been full of reports about the new Rus- sian revolution. Let's pick up a few ex- cerpts. Time, February 12, 1965, pages 23, 25, 28, 29: "Russia's growing community of prag- matic, highly professional economists and engineers understands very clearly what has happened, and is sure that it has the cure-- even if much of it has to he borrowed from the capitalists. One editor proposed aboli- tion of Russia's 50-percent consumer goods tax, argued that all Soviet revenues could be derived from a profits tax, once profit was made the universal indicator, "The manager of a giant construction complex even went so far as to use the phrase 'supply and demand' in pleading for a free-wheeling open market for consumer goods, admitting that it would necessitate major reliance on that old capitalist tech- nique of market research by firms. "Last month a Moscow economist proposed that the profit motive even be extended to agriculture. "Izvestia recently lamented that while the United States has 50 university-level busi- ness-management schools, Russia has none. "Liberman?When asked if he tries to inculcate his students with notions of profitability, he smiles and says, 'Yes, but very carefully: I say that it is my opinion, but there are many objections. I explain them all, and the students draw their own conclusions.' " Business Week, October 31, 1964, page 99: "Prices will be set by producers and re- tailers?not planners. Under the old system It took 6 to 12 months and the approval of nine different agencies to set a price on a new product. "Employment will be determined by man- agers who can expand or contract their labor force freely, Wages will probably still be set by the state, but plant directors will be allowed to increase wages up to 50 percent, out of profits, for good worker performance." Page 100: "There are risks as well as potential gains in the Soviet experiment. Healthy competi- tion will no doubt increase among factories for retail customers and among both fac- tories and retailers for the consumer. With AGo89. competition will come a buildup of the mar- keting efforts that are already well under- way. "For the Russians, marketing expenditures are not such an easy pill to swallow; such 'wastes' were once considered among the mis- fortunes reserved for capitalism. It now ap- pears that they are essential to any mass production-mass consumption economy." Associated Press, March 27, 1965: "'The biggest task now,' said first Secre- tary Brezhnev, 'is to * * * make a wider use of economic and moral incentives in all sec- tions of production on collective and state farms, which should be allowed greater inde- pendence in their economic activities.'" Newsweek, February 18, 1965: "For Muscovites, long accustomed to only the meagerest selection of fresh produce in winter, the abundance available at the Cen- tral Peasant Market last week was a strange sight. "One peasant who arrived in Moscow last week told Newsweek correspondent Robert Korengold that he had traveled 2 days and 2 nights from Baku, 2,200 miles away, arid had laid out $24.42 for his train ticket. But he added, he expected to clear about $333 on the load of pears that he had brought with him. When a woman shopper exclaimed that 5 rubles ($5.65) was far too much to pay for a kilo of pears, the man from Baku re- torted: "It's 5 rubles, lady, because you can't get things like that here in winter." "Behind this new march on Moscow lies a decision by the new team in the Kremlin. They have ruled that a peasant no longer needs written permission to bring his wares to Moscow. In keeping with their tendency to favor economic policies that work re- gardless of whether they coincide with Marx- ist dogma, Russia's new rulers are apparently willing to tolerate an expanded private trade in food. 'As for the Moscow housewife, she's ap- parently delighted with all the fruits and vegetables now available. Said one Muscov- ite shopper: 'Maybe if this system works and the peasants keep producing, we will have so much that the prices will go down,'" New York Times, March 28, 1965: "Last December 9, Premier Kosygin casual- .ly announced, as though it were the most natural thing in the world, 'We shall proceed toward planning on the basis of orders placed by consumers in all branches of the national economy.'" Central planning also involved a lot of change of plant managers who were moved around like civil servants during a reduc- tion in force. The "first in line" got the job regardless of training or ability. Now they are throwing that out. Merit will be the basis for promotion, they say. You can see how far things have gone when you realize that profits can now in- crease "bonuses" of workers by 40 percent and of managers by 50 percent, automati- cally, and the workers' bonuses can be "ad- justed" by management. "Supply and demand, market research, business schools, free prices, hire and fire authority, arbitrary bonuses out of profits, merit promotions, competition, marketing efforts, economic policies that work." When you gather all those words together the jigsaw puzzle be- gins to take shape, So remember, when you read in the papers about another way in which the Soviets are "copying" the West, they aren't exactly. This Is no longer reluctant "copying" of isolated intances, they are simply following and expanding?rapidly?their new way of life. Now, I could go on. There are more and more examples. But the cat's out of the bag. The Rus- sians have discovered our secret weapon. No kidding. So they've ?revolted again. This time it will work. Approved For ReJease 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 Approve For Release 2003/09/26 : C1A-R0P67B00446R000500080005-4 .'A6091) CONGRESSIONAL RLCORD ? APPENDIX Pravda has announced a true truth: That nothing really happens until somebody buys something. That, once out of hunger, they don't buy until they want to buy?and that business- men who make them want to buy, legiti- mately, with attractive, high quality prod- ucts and persuasive salesmen, are the heart of progress. That, by and large, for most things, central planning, socialistic systems work for con- servation?like parks?and protection?like the military and the Food and Drug Admin- istration and social security but they're not munch good for progress. And in the world *e're Ip, we progress or die. Progress requires an economic system that Is market-oriented, profit-motivated (some incentive; usually but not necessarily money, of course), competitive, with decentralized, independent management. This is the biggest joke on American party line followers in 100 years. I wish Mark Twain were still alive. He'd love this. Can't you see the bearded party line pick- ets in Times Square carrying signs that shout: "Up with profit; down with central planning," "We want piecework now." Of course, the Russians may flub this second chance. Politicians and politics can ruin any economic system, and in Russia this would be easy because the state--that is, the Communist Party?is the sole stock- holder. But there's no guarantee that even dedi- cated Communists will let this chance go by. The turnabout has been and is bound to be so dramatic that they'll think twice before they fire a good market-oriented Manager. Progress doesn't require private ownership of the tools of production, anyway. Freedom may, but not progress. Prosperity doesn't know the difference be- tween the state taking half the profits in taxes and giving half the profits in bonuses, as long as management is being measured by return on investment. (Management that's free to make a legiti- mate profit is the key. Ansco film kept very competitive for 20 years even though the U.S. Government owned all the stock a ? ? just as competitive as if a Million stock- holders had owned it.) The government let Geneml Aniline's man- agement rim the show as long as the "return on investment" stayed up, and that's what Russia's talking about. .Assuming that Russian leadership will be satisfied with the prosperity that the new system is sure to bring and will act pretty Much like other stockholders, pretty soon the major difference in our two economic sys- tems may be the words "capitalism" and "communism." The important points are: ? 1. This old-fashioned market-oriented American system will work a ? ? even if it's called the new Liberman plan * ? * no mat- ter who owns the stock, as long as the mana- gers are measured on profits, not politics (or even, as we know here in America, on a little of both) and the workers get bonuses, or raises, for making goods that sell. 2. Russia, if she keeps this up ? * * (and how can they put the chicken back in the egg?) * * * Russia will grow productive, strong and powerful. 3. Once a country tastes the value of change and of the use of profitable new ideas, they won't want to go back. Pros- perity keeps men in office. Next thing for the Russians to invent is the installment plan?consumer credit?and that won't be long now. 4, The Russians aren't "copying" bits and pieces of "Western methods" any more. What we see in the papers is not evidence of reluctant imitation but of the growth of their own new total system. There's a sub- tle and important difference. The satellites are in on this, too. Fact is, some of them are way ahead. Czechoslovakia has decentralized authority and has shifted from plan-fulfillment to profits as a measure of managerial success. They call it "gross value realize," but as one Czech interviewed on TV recently said, "What counts is whether you sell the stuff and can do it at a profit." Hungary has profit sharing and?hang on to your hats?the payment of interest on capital. The prime rate is 5 percent. There's another bit of termite-steel. In- terest is even worse than advertising to Marxists. Better keep your eye on Hungary. Or Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia, it turns out, has been an the profit system for quite awhile. In fact, they have actual stockholders, although only the workers themselves own the stock in the factory. Nevertheless, they've gone so far that a factory can go broke and all the man- agement people lose their jobs if they fail to make a profit. That's incentive. And things are rapidly getting worse for Marx and Lenin. By now, according to reports from a mem- ber of a recent trade mission, 85 percent of all arable land in Yugoslavia is back in pri- vate hands and any business employing five or fewer people can be privately owned. There's no income tax on the first million dinars, with a 50-percent maximum tax. They still call that "communism" in Yugo- slavia. What would you call it? Even East Germany is talking about it. Brand-name advertisements are appearing on the billboard kiosks here and there. And you know how industrious the Ger- mans are. If they are allowed to be effective, they have a tendency to be. If they eat well and have choices?as you always do in a market-oriented, profit-moti- vated economy?then many won't be so des- perate to leave East Germany. Business- men, salesmen, marketing men and advertis- ing men will pop up everywhere. When that happens?for better or worse? the wall will come tumbling down. Obviously, this tremendous 180? change in the Soviet economic system calls for a re- examination (not necessarily a change but a reexamination) of our attitudes and Amer- ican foreign policy. I warned you at the beginning that I was not going to assume that this change in eco- nomic theory would make Russia a bosom pal of the United States. Neither can I as- sume that it will make her more of an enemy. But in a way, the question of what to do about Russia's coming economic might is more perplexing than the what to do about the Chinese bomb * ? * because we know the bomb is evil as far as we are concerned, and we can't be sure whether Russia will use the atomic power of profits as a friend or as a foe. Of course, some folks say that we've been drifting toward Government control, cen- tral planning, and deprofiting of American business and Government support of non- productive nonworkers to the point where it won't be long until we cross systems with Russia and change sides. Wouldn't that be something. And It could happen. Certainly, we've just about wiped out pro- duction incentive pay only to find Russia thriving on it. Would our unions accept a 40 percent "you get It only if your produc- tion sells" bonus and "management discre- tion"? And, honest now, that Czech on TV said, "We in Czechoslovakia now believe (get this) that "what is good for society is also good for the individual company; and what is good for the individual company is good for so- ciety." Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA- October 22, 1965 Ever hear anything like that before? When an American said that he almost got jeered out of the President's Cabinet. Surely we want to avoid that switchover. But we'll have to watch our step. For Russia is now on the right track, eco- nomically. And we know that Russians are smart and capable, as well as clever, so there's no need for us to underestimate them. They're wise to central planning and state- supported nonworkers by now?they've had a go at it. Forty long say years of it. Boy, how they must regret those wasted years. Will they glorify initiative, profit, bonus, work, self-improvement, personal responsi- bility, opportunity, salesmanship a ? * and start spreading wealth the "American" way? I think the odds are at least 80 to 20 that they will. Well, you make the U.S. foreign policy. How are you going to react? Do you want to encourage Russia toward a high-powered, highly motivated economic system? Should we show her how to build her marker-oriented economy now that she's willing to listen? Or, if we have any influence, should we try to talk her out of this "profitable idea"? She'll be asking * * * wanting to know how American salesmen do it. Asking for sales and advertising know-how. Will encouragement and help just be aid- ing the enemy * a a or will it be man's last , great hope? What will happen if we do drift toward a Government-controlled central-planning, nonincentive, state support for nonworkers, system ? ? a until we cross the Russian drive toward their new, effective, decentralized, in- centive, more-pay-for-more-effective-work system? Will we then become the second most powerful nation in the world, economically? Is this how they hope to "bury" us?with our own discarded weapons? You make policy in the United States. What do you think? Cuban Refugees EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. DANTE B. FASCELL OF FLORIDA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Friday, October 22, 1965 Mr. FASCELL. Mr. Speaker, last week I called upon the appropriate committees of Congress to insure that any agree- ment between Cuba and the United States on the entry of Cuban refugees into this country must contain certain conditions and safeguards for the south Florida area as well as the United States, The response to that speech, Mr. Speaker, has been most gratifying. The chairmen of the appropriate subcommit- tees have assured me of their full con- sideration. Already the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Inter-Ameri- can Affairs has held hearings. Especially gratifying to me and to all the people of south Florida has been the expression by people in all parts of the United States of a willingness to assume both this privilege and the burden of additional thousands of Cuban refugees. Congress has recognized that the ref- ugee problem is a national one, and I am happy that in this case it so ably reflects ,671300446R000500080005-4 ?,,,?Aaproved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 26894 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? 110LISE October 21, 1965 Must be counted as jobless when they lose a job and search for another, the Department argues. , There is evidence, though, that any judg- ment of the seriousness of current unemploy- Went requires more than just an awareness of the over-all jobless rate. Interviews with more than 60 jobless individuals such as Mr. Anderson a,nd Mrs. Barita, at State unem- ployment offices and other spots in the Youngstown, Pittsburgh, and Erie, Pa., areas and talks with State and Federal employment specialists in a number of States suggest that hard-core unemployment is a much smaller problem than the Government's official job- less figure would indicate. FEW ARE UNDER REAL STRAIN ? This survey indicates that a large segment of the ranks of the currently unemployed is Wade up of persons only temporarily idle while between lobs or not seeking employ- ment in any more than a cursory manner. Another_ sizable group includes wives, sons or daughters of the family breadwinner, who often don't have to support their families. Many others are people who find it difficult to get work because of old age, lack of train- ing, education or physical or emotional Capability. - A sampling of unemployed persons in Toungstown and Erie turned up 34 family household heads out of work. Of these, only four had been jobless longer than 3 months, or were actively looking for work and were without immediate prospects. Ameng 16 nonbreaclwinners, only one wanted work and hadn't found it for some time. The rest were either laid off seasonally, were be- tween jobs, or indica:ted they weren't under much strain to find another. Of the five who could be classed as hard-core unemployed, one Was a heart patient and one an alcoholic Stich sampling itself can be misleading, of course, since such persons as the large nurnber of teenagers in the market and the Unemployed who've exhausted their State payments obviously don't show up at State compensation offices. Nonetheless, nearly tWo-thirds of the Nation's unemployed are covered by such payments. And many State employment officials say their over-all job- less rates are no-longer cause for major con- cern. This gives evidence that the brisk economy is, for now anyway, overcoming the effects of automation on employment. In Ohio, where the jobless rate is about percent Heman Pound, director of unem- ployment compensation, exclaims, "It's al- most fantastic that you can get down this low in an industrial State. I don't know What full employment is, but this is getting pretty close.? The Journal survey turned up a good many persons even among jobless pay re- cipients who weren't eager to find any job Other than one they might be recalled to, and some none at all, One reason for their lack of concern is that their joblessness is only temporary and not 111,1111ns too much financially_ U.S. long-term- Unemployment (15 weeks or more) was under 3, percent at mid-September. State officials maintain that a considerable amount of short-term unemployment is inevitable as the result of such things as businesses clos- ing and new ones starting, seasonal fluctua- tions and other changes. . "I don't want to take any job that isn't better than- the one I had,' say g a laid-off , machine operator at a toy factory in Erie. He was put out of work about 21/2 months earlier because of the plant's seasonal close- down, but with full expectation of early re- call, Meanwhile, he has been subsisting on unemprOyment compensation. Many of the interviewed jobseekers weren't 9,047, eager to find work even though they had' no 'Yong-term 'prospects for get- ting employment. Mr. Anderson, the re- tired steel plant worker, is a case in point. He says he was forced to retire at 65 in 1963 and couldn't find a desirable job afterward? one comparable to his $575-a-month mill position. "What the heck?they don't bother with an old man?too many young fellows out looking for work," Mr. Anderson snorts. He finally gave up seriously trying to find a job, though he still makes some modest at- tempts, at least while drawing unemploy- ment compensation benefits. Those benefits, which lately ran about $85 a month, supple- mented $70 in pension from the steel mill, $124 in social security benefits and a $48- per-month veteran's pension. The jobless pay ran out in June, but in September Mr. Anderson's wife started drawing $46.50 monthly in social security benefits of her own. "I really didn't need a job," Mr. An- derson admits; his income and living ex- penses "run nip and tuck." A retired storm window salesman inter- viewed in the Youngstown office of the State bureau of unemployment compensation ex- presses a similar lack of fervor about seek- ing work. He says he spends 41/2 months every winter as a racetrack betting teller in Florida, then comes home to Youngstown and collects jobless pay. "I'm 77?I can't get work here," he explains. State employment offices and private agen- cies cite numerous instances of jobs going begging either because many persons ostensi- bly in the labor force don't particularly want a job or are too selective in what they'll ac- cept---.as to pay or type of work. State un- employment officials in New York City report difficulty in filling such relatively unattrac- tive and low-paying jobs as shirt-pressers in dry cleaning shops. And "thousands" of employable young persons in the Philadel- phia area are "not only not work-oriented, but hardly even trying to find work," ac- cording to Jack Brown, executive director of Pennsylvania's Bureau of Employment Secu- rity. SOME JOBS SNUBBED Employment agencies say that many per- sons who once would have filled domestic- help positions now turn up their noses at be- ing cooks, cleaning women, or maids, causing a surplus of such jobs. Servants willing to live in the homes where they work are espe- cially hard to find, agencies say. Part of the problem of heavy Negro unem- ployment, jobless experts add, is that Negroes no longer are willing to fill the menial jobs that they traditionally have held. The civil rights movement of the last few years has helped foster a resentment toward such work, they say, and the low pay of many such jobs often doesn't offer enough attraction to Ne- groes who are already getting relief benefits. Harry King, a 40-year-old Negro who for- merly drew $1.75 an hour washing windows of high-rise buildings, lost his job last sum- mer when the washing concern folded. He's been taking in $100 a month, often less, by odd painting jobs. He also gets $41.50 twice a month on relief. Standing on a street cor- ner in Pittsburgh's Hill district, a Negro ghetto, Mr. King makes it clear that he doesn't want any job that pays under $70 a week. "What's the sense of my taking a job for less?" he asks. "By the time I pay carfare and my rent, I've got nothing left. Very few people mind working, but they'd like to get something for it." There are also a number of jobless persons Who want work and probably could find it if they were willing or able to move to get avail- able jobs. When a major steel company in- terviewed over 1,200 men laid off when Stude- baker Corp. closed its South Bend, Ind., plant in an attempt to 1111 openings for steelwork- ers at a mill about 50 miles away, only 3 ended up being hired. "I would have said that everybody we in- terviewed was suitable?we'd have taken them, but they didn't take us," comments an official of the steel company. Many jobless persons, to be sure, are seri- ous about wanting work. But, it is also clear, an important segment of that group isn't in dire need of jobs and their inclusion in Government statistics on the unemployed app rs to saint an unduly gloomy picture. AN REFUGEE SITUATION (Mr. HARVEY of Indiana (at the re- quest of Mr. BROYHILL of North Caro- lina) was granted permission to extend his remarks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous matter.) Mr. HARVEY of Indiana. Mr. Speaker, on my monthly radio-TV broadcast, which goes back to my con- gressional district in Indiana, I had as my guest yesterday my good friend and colleague, Congressman PAUL ROGERS of Florida. Because of Mr. Room' interest and understanding of the Cuban refugee sit- uation and, since he represents a section of south Florida, it is my feeling that the Congress and the Nation should be inter- ested in Congressman ROGERS' observa- tions. During our discussion, I am happy to say, Congressman ROGERS offered many enlightening observations; however, one of the most important referred to the fact that Castro unilaterally initiated the recent sending of refugees to our shores, without the consideration or the release of hostages or political prisoners. Mr. ROGERS went on to say that it is Indeed a pitiful sight to see these people landing on our shores in boats of all kinds. It was also mentioned that it is unfortunate the Organization of Amer- ican States has not been invited to play a more predominant role in the final determination of the fate of these people. As a Congressman from the Midwest it seems appropriate to remind my col- leagues that this problem is not a local- ized problem, affecting only Florida, but it is a national problem involving security. The fact remains that our intelligence sources were caught completely off guard by Castro's announcement and the prob- lem of screening processes?which must necessarily go on to insure that Castro is not planting agents in the United States?is a real difficult one which I believe the Congress should concern it- self with. With Cuba now a Communist satellite in our hemisphere every pre- caution must be taken to insure the authenticity of these refugees. Insofar as the reuniting of families is concerned, there is no question about the justifiable humanitarian side of this problem. We owe the State of Florida our applause for what she is doing for these people; however, as it relates to the Nation, it seems in order to remind the Nation of the Communist doctrine as it tries to infiltrate and conquer from within. Again, my thanks to Congressman ROGERS for sharing his valuable time with me and the people of the 10th Con- gressional District in Indiana. PROPOSAL TO MAKE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PART OF THE STATE OF MARYLAND (Mr. BETTS (at the request of Mr. BROYHILL of North Carolina) was granted rermisscon to extend his remarks at this Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R00050d08043054-- ?dab er 21, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD HOUSE 26893 would train at the same time for the ,job, not with company X, but with tiOrnpally Y. Of course, company X should 'not be charged with the cost of the retrain- ing from Which it derives no economic bene- fit, 4tne?ver, it would be relatively easy to Set tip -the mechanism whereby the costs of refiaining could be borne by the ultimate rtar. Furthermore, the Federal tax laws in- hibit, instead of encourage, the mobility and flexibility of labor which are so vital in coping with frictional and structural unem- ployment. Probably the reality most often overlooked is that the displaced worker frequently is not the one best suited to be trained to take on the newly created job. The obsolete jobs tend to be considerably inferior to the jobs newly created by automation. Further- more, the jobs going begging today are Jobs which demand skills higher than the na- tional average of skills. The process of train- ing for the high skills in demand usually requires that a person holding down a good job upgrade his skill in order to prepare for the new and better job. His old job then becomes available for someone below him in the ladder of skills, who will upgrade his skill in a similar and simultaneous manner through night school or on-the-job training. Meeting the changes demanded by automa- tion requires a massive and constant up- grading process all along society's ladder of skills. A person holding down a job which is too easy for him does a disservice to himself, to society, and to the person with less natural abilities who could be doing the less demand- ing job. For example, a person with two arms who preempts a job which a one-armed man might do and who refuses to undertake an available job which requires two arms thwarts the upgrading process which auto- mation demands. Finally, I would observe that possibly we face a problem which has never before been presented to us quite so clearly. Yet it is an age-old problem. With the continued upgrading of skills and with greater em- phasis upon brain instead of brawn, those who were born with very limited mental talents could be phased out of the labor market. Throughout much of history the person deficient in brawn tended to be an economic drone. A similar situation may now be developing with regard to those en- dowed with very limited mental capacities. However, / believe that by a system of proper job analysis we can find a sufficient number of economically sound jobs which persons of limited IQ can perform. Even many of those we presently institutionalize can per- form useful tasks during a period of cyber- nation. After all, a human brain with a 60 IQ is still a much more versatile and usable thinking apparatus, particularly with regard to dealing with variables, then the inost talented computer. MANY IN UNEMPLOYMENT COUNT DO NOT COUNT (Mr. CURTIS (at the request of Mr. Baovnna. of North Carolina) was granted permission to extend his re- marks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous matter.) Mr. CURTIS. Mr. Speaker, the ad- ministration places a strong emphasis on reducing the unemployment rate to an arbitrarily defined level. This level is now set at 4 percent of the work force as measured by our present Bureau of Labor Statistics-BLS. The administra- tion seems to forget that our unemploy- ment statistical series gives us at best a very crude indication of real unemploy- ment. Criticism comes from opposite sides, one side arguing from time to time that the series underestimates real un- employment, the other side arguing that it overestimates real unemployment. My 01/11 judgment is that probably both sides are correct. When we are in an economic doWnturn the series tends to underesti- mate and in periods of economic upturn it overestimates. A recent survey conducted by the Wall Street Journal indicates that the present estimate of unemployment, 4.4 percent of the work force in September, is un- realistically high and that determina- tion of the real significance of the pres- ent level of unemployment requires more than just an awareness of the overall jobless rate. The survey concluded that a large segment of the group presently labeled "unemployed" is made up of per- sons only temporarily idle while between jobs or not seeking employment in any more than a cursory manner. Another sizable portion includes wives, sons, or daughters of the family breadwinner. These unemployed often do not need work to support their families. Many others are people who find it difficult to get work because of old age, lack of train- ing, education or physical or emotional capability. There is a further sign that unem- ployment may not be as bad as the sta- tistical sampling leads us to believe. State employment offices and private agencies cite numerous instances of jobs going begging either because many per- sons ostensibly in the labor force do not really want a job or are too selective in what pay or type of work they will se- lect. What is true, I believe, is that there is a high incidence of people not work- ing in our society, not working because of lack or incentive or lack of skills, not because of a lack of jobs. Not working Is not the same as unemployed as de- fined in our BLS unemployment sta- tistics. The proof of this important fact lies in a statistical series to which too little attention has been paid; namely, the "Labor Force Participation Rate." In 1964 that rate was 57.4 percent, the low- est since 1947. The rate in 1956 was 59.3 percent, and averaged 58.54 percent for the decade 1951-60. The average for the first 4 years of this decade 1961-64 is 57.51 percent. If the labor force par- ticipation rate in 1964 was 59.3 percent as it was in 1956, and not 57.4 percent, 2,548,717 more, men and women would halt been in the labor force. Attention is directed to the following: Labor force participation rate Percent 1947 57.4 1943 57. 9 1949 58.0 1950 S8.4 1951 58.9 1952 58. 8 1953 MI 5 1934 58.4 1955 53. 7 1956 59.3 1957 58. 7 1958 58.5 1959 58.3 1980 58.3 1861 58.0 1962 57.4 1963 51.3 1964 57.4 For 1965 the Monthly unadjusted fig- ures are: January 55.9 February 56.4 March 56.5 April 56.9 May 57.7 June 50.3 July 59.8 I include this article from the October 13 Wall Street Journal entitled "Who's Still Jobless?" in the RECORD at this point. wHo Is STILL JOBLESS?-MANY IN GOVERN- MENT'S COUNT ARE No UNDER STRAIN To WORK (By Albert R. Karr) YOTJNGSTOWN.-William J. Anderson, 66, relaxes on a lounge chair on the front porch of his modest home here and relates how he retired as a steel plant millwright late in 1963. He looked for a job until his Ohio un- employment compensation ran out last June and since then has taken life easy. "I do not want to be tied down anymore- I worked since I was 10 years old and that was long enough," he says. In nearby Hubbard, Ohio, Mrs. Kay Barita, 52, leaves her chores in her paneled kitchen long enough to tell a visitor how she worked for 20 years until she was laid off at a meat packing factory last fall. For half a year she drew $42 a week in jobless pay, which came on top of her husband's take-home pay of about $125 a week. She tried until recently to find a new job. Now, she says, "They have my name. If they need anybody, they can just call me." Mr. Anderson and Mrs. Barita are among a good many people throughout the United States who recently have been looking for a job. Also, like an unknown number of oth- ers, they haven't been particularly eager to find work, are not in serious need of employ- ment and are not readily employable. Significantly, either one conceivably could have been counted as unemployed in the U.S. Government's monthly survey of the Nation's work force and thus contributed to the sample on which Uncle Sam calculated the percent of the work force that is jobless. Any interviewees who say they are not work- ing and are looking for a job are classed as unemployed. Yet neither Mr. Anderson nor Mrs. Barita would seem to fit most people's notion of the "hard-core unemployed"- those desperate for jobs who are searching for any means to keep themselves and their families clothed and fed. FIGURES 'UNDER FIRE How typical are people like Mr. Anderson and Mrs. Barita among the unemployed? No one knows for sure, partly because it is nearly impossible to say whether a particu- lar person really wants a job and needs it. But there is a growing amount of criticism of use of the Government's raw figures on the total unemployed. Administration officials were pleased that the official jobless rate dropped to 4.5 percent of the work force in mid-July, the lowest since 1957, in the face of a seasonal influx of teen- agers in the job market, and fell further to 4.4 percent in mid-September. But they still express concern at even this much unemploy- ment in a record-shattering economy. Many of the critics say that the 4.4 per- cent figure is unrealistically high and is used wrongly to justify Government measures aimed at creating jobs. Federal officials, while admitting their jobless estimate is an imperfect measure of unemployment, say that any alternative method might under- state or overstate the problem even more. So-called "secondary workers" such as teen- agers and married women are included in the listing of' unemployed, the Labor Depart- ment says, because they account for over one-fourth of all workers; if they're to be counted as employed when working, they Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 ...Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 21, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE point in the RECORD and to include ex- traneous matter.) Mr BE'r IS Mr. Speaker, only with the thought of trying to be helpful, I am offering a plan for the solution of the District of Columbia problem. In doing this, I make the following observations: First, pure home rule is difficult to re- solve because of a genuine constitutional question as well as the inability to solve the problem of financing; Second, representation by a nonvoting delegate is no representation at all; Third, giving the District two Senators and representation in the House on the basis of its population elevates it to the rank of a State when, as a matter of law and fact, it is only a city; and Fourth, it is, however, difficult to deny any community as large and important as the District of Columbia the right of representation in the Federal Congress. This is more justified than home rule. After all, representation is basic in our philosophy of government. I have therefore introduced a resolu- tion for a constitutional amendment providing that, for the purpose of rep- resentation in Congress, the District shall be considered a part of the State of Maryland. This would permit its local government to remain, as now, under the legislative control of Congress. But it would, provide representation. in the body which controls it. The two Mary- land Senators would represent both the State and the District and be elected by the voters of both the State and the District. The District of Columbia would be divided into congressional districts as if it were a part of Maryland and, for the purpose of redistricting, Maryland and the District would be considered together as if they were one State. This plan could not be classified as retrocession because nothing would be ceded to Maryland. It would leave the District just as it is, a Federal city under legislative control of Congress, but, at the same time givetits residents repre- sentation in Congress. Such a proposal does, however, con- flict with the 23d amendment, which treats the District as an entity. This difficulty is best overcome by repeal of the 23d amendment and inclusion of its provision in the new proposal. The resolution reads as follows: Resolved by the Senate and House of Rep- resentatives of the United States of America In Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the follow- ing article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitntion of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution only if ratified by the Congress. "Aarrici. -- "SEcriox 1, The twenty-third article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed. 2..F1Dr the purposes of representation In both 1-1011SeS of the Congress and the ap- pointment of electors of President and Vice President, the District of Columbia shall be considered as part of the State of Maryland. "SEC. 8. Section 2 shall not tae effect until the transmission by the President to the Congress of the statement, as provided in _section 2g ox the Act of June 18, 192q (2 2a), showing the number of Rep- resentatives to which each State woufd be entitled following the next decennial census of the population after the ratification of this article." CONGRESSMAN CLEVELAND COM- MENTS ON RESULTS OF SECOND NEW HAMPSHIRE DISTRICT QUESTIONNAIRE (Mr. CLEVELAND (at the request of Mr. BROYHILL of North Carolina) was granted permission to extend his re- marks at this /point in the RECORD and to include extraneous matter.) Mr. CLEVELAND. Mr. Speaker, for the third successive year, I have sent questionnaires to my? constituents and wish to take this opportunity of present- ing the results to the House. I wish I could also share with my colleagues the many interesting and constructive com- ments which constituelits returned with their answers but space limitations do not permit. The questionnaire was mailed general- ly to all postal patrons in my district last June. I believe the replies are an im- portant indication of how a large group of thoughtful citizens feel about some of the current issues facing the Nation. LUMP LEGISLATION Because so many of the legislative pro- posals of the Great Society come to us packaged in large omnibus bills contain- ing numerous, distinctly separate pro- grams under one attractive-sounding title, it proved difficult to frame questions that could be answered "yes" or "no." . There is a growing tendency to legislate by lump and by label, a tendency I view with concern. This situation, however, provides no excuse for not asking the people how they feel on the issues and, although I do not always agree with my constituency?and cerainly all of them do not always agree with me?I think it is important to the cause of good gov- ernment that issues be discussed and ideas exchanged. In the following reporting of the re- sults, I have noted not only the "yes," "no" and "not sure" tabulations but also the figures showing the number of blanks, which in some instances are sig- nificant. Question 9(c), for example, ap- parently was poorly drafted as indicated by the large number who did not answer it. DISTRICT SWITCHES ON FOREIGN AID Perhaps the most significant informa- tion provided by the results is the gen- eral disfavor now accorded by my dis- trict to the foreign aid program. My previous polls had not clearly indicated this. It is obvious that my constituents now feel that the foreign aid program should be carefully reevaluated and I agree. Before getting to the results, I want to comment briefly on my own positions on the questions. Many constituents who replied asked how I felt on these issues and I think they are entitled to know. CLEVELAND ANSWERS QUESTIONNAIRE I am on record as supporting U.S. policy generally in Vietnam and the Dominican Republic, although reserv- ing, of course, the right' to criticize these policies when I think they are 26895 wrong. My chief criticism continues to be that our Government has not made our intentions to stand by our commit- ments clear enough. Such failures, in my, opinion, have always encouraged miscalculations by aggressors. I voted again' thisyear to continue the foreign aid program, although I voted for the moderate cuts that were made and voted, also, against continuing aid to Indonesia and Egypt, and countries trading with North Vietnam. AcAncsr REPEAL OF 14(b) I voted against repeal of section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Labor Act. I sup- ported the voting rights bill, after first cosponsoring and voting for the broad- er, more equitable Republican alterna- tive, which, among- other things, would have retained literacy tests where not clearly discriminatory. Also, I voted for the clean elections amendment proposed by Republicans to help insure that bal- lots are honestly cast and counted. I have long favored increasing a Con- gressman's term from 2 to 4 years, but only if there is added a limit on the number of terms that a Congressman can serve consecutively. GUN CONTROL LEGISLATION Although I strongly oppose Senator DODD'S gun control bill (S. 1592) because it goes too far, I do feel that strengthen- ing of Federal control over the distribu- tion of firearms is in order. I will sup- port legislation that bans the shipment across State lines of mail-order weapons to those under 18 and to persons with felony convictions. I would support Federal control over the transportation of concealed firearms, and I would sup- port legislation to impose increased pen- alties for crimes involving the misuse of firearms, and legislation to curb the flood of foreign firearms that are being dumped here. In my opinion, the fore- going objectives can be obtained without denying ownership of firearms to Amer- ican citizens of good repute using them for lawful purposes. Legitimate gun dealers, hobbyists and sportsmen need not be penalized nor should any legisla- tion be permitted to infringe on a citi- zen's right to keep and bear arms as guaranteed by the second amendment to the U.S. Constitution. NEW DEPARTMENT?FARM SUBSIDIES? IMMIGRATION I voted against creating the new Cabi- net-level Department of Housing and Urban Affairs, supporting instead the Republican proposal to create a new of- fice of Housing in the Executive Office of the President. This would have done the job more efficiently, I believe, and was far more comprehensive. I strongly favor limiting the dollar amount of sub- sidies that could be paid to any one farm or farmer. Evidence from governmental sources shows that Federal farm subsid- ies are going to large farm operations in disproportionate amounts while the small farmer is not being helped. I voted for the new immigration law, the chief purposes of which are to permit the reuniting of families, the entry of persons with needed skills, and the abo- lition of the outmoded national origins quota systems. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 .? CIA-RDP671300446R00050001000,4 26896 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE October 21, 1965, DRAFT-IMPORTS-REFORMS NEEDED I oppose ending the military draft but favor a revision of procedures to guar- antee fairer and more equitable treat- ment for all young men. I favor Federal income tax exemptions or credits far the cost of higher educa- tion and have introduced legislation to accomplish this purpose. I favor quantitative restrictions or agreed upon quotas to limit imports of woolen products as promised by the Ad- ministration for 4 years, and also re- strictions and quotas for other imports of a similar nature. Beyond that, I have long advocated a general reform of the U.S. tariff schedule so that the rates of duties will reflect the differing wage rates in foreign countries shipping goods to us. New rates should also reflect those cases where the manufacturing of goods being shipped to the United States is being sub- Questionnaire results sidized by foreign governments. The purpose of such rates would not be pro- tectionism in the traditional sense. The purpose would be to establish more equi- table conditions of international competi- tion, orderly marketing, expanded for- eign trade, and improved standards of living for all. I voted against the administration's rent-subsidy plan. Yes No Not sure Blank In general, do you favor- I. U.S. policy in Vietnam? 4,415 1,556 873 198 2. U.S. policy in the Dominican Republic? 4,699 1, 161 964 218 3. Continuing the foreign aid program? 2,602 3,058 1,003 370 4. Continuing aid to Indonesia and Egypt? 780 4,964 1,045 253 5. Repeal of see. 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act which allows States to pass right-to-work laws? 1,713 4,161 872 296 6. a) Federal legislation to guarantee voting rights? 5,353 1,072 286 331 ) Retaining literacy tests where these are not discriminatory and not jueused to prevent Negroes from voting? 5,880 767 235 160 e) A "clean elections" amendment to insure a fair vote count? 6,126 257 418 2411 7. IncreasIng Congressmen's terms from 2 to 4 years? 3,999 2,332 590 121 8. Limiting the number of terms a Congressman can serve? 2,293 4,097 479 183 9. a) Stronger Federal legislation to control sales of guns? 4, 176 2,429 301 136 ) Ending mail-order sales of all guns? 3,869 2,717 307 149 c) Limiting ban to concealed weapons, e.g., pistols? 2,827 2,602 975 548 10. A new Cabinet-level Department to deal with public housing and urban affairs? 1,924 3,876 1,096 146 11. A top limit on subsidies paid to any one farmer or farm to spread benefits which now heavily favor big operators? 5,880 495 443 224 12. Changing our present national origins system of immigration to permit entry of persons with needed skills regardless of na- tional origins? 3,656 2,540 695 151 13. Permitting persons with close relatives in the United States to enter without regard to country of origin? 2,403 5,455 891 203 14. Ending the military draft? 1,282 5,097 405 268 15. Federal tax exemptions or credits for costs of higher education? 5,088 1,336 463 155 16. Quantitative restrictions or agreed-upon quotas to limit imports of woolen products (as promised for the past 4 years)? 4, 496 1,267 1,677 202 17. Restrictions on other imports of a similar nature? 4, 132 1, 489 1, 170 251 18. President Johnson's proposal to subsidize rent for low-income families in lieu of additional public housing? 1, 528 4,339 962 213 FURTHER COMMENT ON CONDI- TIONS AT THE SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, VETERANS' ADMINISTRA- TION HOSPITAL (Mr. SAYLOR (at the request of Mr. BROYHILL of North Carolina) was granted permission to extend his re- marks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous matter.) Mr. SAYLOR. Mr. Speaker, Members will recall that on Tuesday, the 19th, I made reference in the RECORD and quoted a number of passages from an official report of the Veterans' Adminis- tration concerning conditions at the Vet- erans' Administration Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah. May I emphasize that the report is an official VA report; It is not conclusions or findings on my part. This morning, I was visited by the Associate Deputy Administrator, the Deputy Chief Medical Director, and an Assistant Chief Medical Director, who presented me with the following state- ment on behalf of Dr. McNinch, the Chief Medical Director, which I ask unanimous consent to insert as a part of my re- marks at this point: STATEMENT BY DR. JOSEPH H. McNINcH, VA's CHIEF MEDICAL DIRECTOR, ON THE SALT LAKE CITY VA HOSPITAL The recent publicity of alleged irregulari- ties at the Salt Lake City VA Hospital was based on a report by VA's own InternaL audit service following an extensive audit of sta- tion activities. Such audits are conducted periodically within the VA organization as a sound management device to assure the ade- quacy of personnel and programs. A followup study of the report by our De- partment of Medicine and Surgery generally supported the findings of the internal audit service, and corrective action has been taken. I am satisfied personally that the hospital is rendering excellent medical care to sick and disabled veterans, and that the adminis- trative laxities that were uncovered have been ended. By far the most serious of the allegations was that resident physicians had refused a nurse's request to check the condition of a patient she believed to be seriously ill. The hospital director confirmed this allegation, and reported that it involved isolated inci- dents on just one of the many wards at the hospital-a geriatric ward. Partly to blame was a misunderstanding between the psy- chiatric service and the medical service as to supervisory responsibility for the geriatric ward. The officer-of-the-day physician deter- mined to be primarily responsible for non- response to the nurse's request was repri- manded by the hospital chief of staff the day immediately following the first incident. When the same resident physician-who has since left VA's employ-again failed to re- spond in a similar situation, the patient was seen in a matter of minutes by another physician. Although some irregularities in- cluded in the audit 'report required further Investigation and confirmation, I considered the failure of physicians to respond to call so serious that, when I received the audit re- port, I took immediate action to require the director to take measures to assure there would be no repetition of such incidents. I have received assurances that there will be none. On October 12, the Administrator of Vet- erans' Affairs approved disciplinary actions recommended by me in connection with the total report on the hospital. These actions, which are now being carried out, will be noted In the official records for each of staff members involved. Mr. Speaker, I also insert as a part of my remarks the text of letters presented to me by officials of the Veterans' Ad- ministration at their conference previ- ously referred to: AUGUST 30, 1965. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR, VA Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah. Dear : I have had presented to me the report of internal audit that was conducted at your station from May 19 to July 23. This report has some 210 recommendations., These are not yet fully staffed out because of the brief time that has elapsed since receipt. There are three items which do not need further staff work to announce my positive position. I want my positive position to be known to you and I desire that you make this position crystal clear to every member of your professional staff. Item 1: It is set forth in the audit report (p. VIII-2) that "some service chiefs state that their primary responsibility is to the teaching program first, research second, and the care of the veteran third." Nothing could be farther from the truth. I have on many occasions stated in strong language that the primary mission of DM & S is the care and treatment of the veteran patient.. It is for the purpose of strengthening our medical competency to achieve this goal that we engage in the most worthwhile activities of research and teaching. It does the VA medical program irreparable damage to have members of the professional staff disseminate such Ill conceived and fallacious views. You are directed to take immediate steps to see that these staff members are properly oriented to the mission of DM & S. Item 2: I am most distressed to read in the internal audit report (p. VIII 4-5) about the difficulties that your station is experienc- ing in getting proper OD coverage of the geriatric ward. It is inconceivable that physicians will refuse to respond to emer- gency calls from nurses who are caring for these patients as apparently is occurring at your station. Has the age of specialization. advanced (regressed) to that degree that specialists have relinquished their profes- sional and moral obligations to the sufferer. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 20,Apyired For ReMgdfiggRALCitEnCt3BOMMOR500080005-4 26673 Let's wait and see * *, * and hope that, in reasonable time and in spite ofsummer, there $00,n, will be action for a more beauti- ful Seattle. FOCUS Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. President, an ar- ticulate and dedicated Harvard-trained Cuban exile, Dr. N'estor Carbonell, Jr., delivered a speech early this year which escaped the attention of the Nation's Press. Dr. Carbonell addressed the Second Annual Conference on Latin American Affairs at Princeton University on April 24, 1965. His four-part speech was entitled, "Cuba in Focus." I rec- ommend it to the attention of my col- leagues and readers of the RECORD and ask that it be printed in the body of the RECORD. There being no objection, the speech was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: CUBA IN FOCUS (Address delivered by Dr. Nestor Carbonell, Jr., at the Second Annual Conference on Latin American Affairs, Princeton Univer- sity, on April 24, 1965) I. warms VERSUS FALLACIES welcome this opportunity to participate in this seminar on Cuba, organized under the auspices of a leading university which pro- motes the exchange of ideas, the confronta- tion of opinions, In an atmosphere of free- dom. and respect for all. I value very highly the inalienable right to concur or dissent which we are exercising here today, for I come from a country where this right no longer exists. It has been abolished by a regime which boasts of having popular support, but does not dare to hold free elections; which claims to be fulfilling the economic and aocial 'needs of the people of Cuba, but has had to ration food, clothing, and other 'essentials of human life. A regime Which promised to embrace the doctrine of humanism, but has resorted to purges, mas- sive arrests and deportations, and to the fir- ing squad. A regime which purported to Convert the barracks of the Batista dictator- ship into schools, but has transformed the island into the second military power of this hemisphere. A regime which announced the Mass distribution of private estates and farms among the peasants, but which instead ?reaped large State cooperatives, policed by the government and opposed by an increas- ing number of peasants, whose resistance or lack of iriterest has determined a decline of more than 45 percent in the levels of agricul- tural production. A regime which raised the banner of national independence and self- determination, but has converted Cuba into a Soviet colony which threatens the peace and security of the hemisphere and disrupts the Alliance for Progress plans of economic development and social reforms for Latin 'America. R. 110'w DID IT HAPPEN? You may still wonder how could this have happened to the freedom-loving people of Cubaj, tioW could this Coirimunist takeover Ils.Ve ? cUrred Only 90 miles off the coasts of ? ited States? Te answer, could' be 'MEDIA 4?/011OWS : rkt?tiSt4, Afetatorship weakened the denaocratie institutiians and corrupted and dernof-Alized'the upper echelons of the army to the point where it collapsed when the dictator lied under the pressure exerted by 'national resistance and by the embargo upon slpments of arms to Cuba decreed by the v Ment Of the '17nUed StateS, 0 entrenched in the mountains and portraYek aS an evangelic redeemer by a , formidable international propaganda ap- paratus, took advantage of the political vacuum which ensued. His promises of free- dom, honesty in public administration and economic and social reforms under our 1940 Constitution, were only intended to give him time to place his men in key posts and to lay the foundations of the Communist regime. When demagogic slogans did not suffice to calm the people of Cuba, the Castro regime resorted to class struggle and to the dis- semination of terror. Thousands of Cubans from all walks of life were either arrested, executed, or exiled. In spite of this, inter- nal resistance, which included sabotage in the cities and guerrillas in the mountains, began to undermine the regime. Then came the Bay of Pigs disaster which allowed Castro to defeat the invading forces and to capture many of the underground leaders who had not been informed of the details of the in- vasion. Notwithstanding this major defeat, Internal resistance grew again, and it grew so powerful, that the Castro regime pierced the veil of Communist secrecy to secure the open and massive military aid from the So- viet bloc. Even though the captive people of Cuba have not received the corresponding support from the Americas, in accordance with the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assist- ance, the struggle against Communist do- mination continues inside Cuba, and the ramifications of the conspiracy against the Castro regime have reached the upper strata of the army and the militia, which at this very moment are being subjected to another violent and indiscriminate purge. III. WHY CUBA? Why was Cuba chosen by international communism as its launching pad for subver- sion and aggression in this hemisphere? A close look at the map of the Americas will give us the answer. From a geo-political standpoint, Cuba lies in the center of what has been called the American Mediterranean. Ever since its discovery by Columbus in 1492, Cuba has been regarded as a key to the new world. In connection with the strategic impor- tance of Cuba and the threat posed by its progressive fortification and subversive activities, a noted American strategist, Brig. Gen. J. D. Hittle, stated the following: "Cuba stands astride the north-south sea lanes upon which the wartime survival and the economic well-being of the Americas de- pend. It commands the Caribbean and the Atlantic approaches to the Panama Canal." "The Russian takeover of Cuba constitutes the most significant strategic achievement of world CODUITUDISIII SUICD_ the fall of mainland China in the Red orbit. What it means is that Russian communism has leap-frogged NATO, jumped the Atlantic, Which histori- cally has been our protecting moat, and established a bastion in the strategic heart of the Western Hemisphere." (ColmasssioNAL RECORD, Appendix*, July 25, 1963, pp. A4697- A4698.) The entire hemisphere, especially the Latin American republics, have suffered the lethal effects of the Communist takeover of Cuba, which is used as a training center for Latin American terrorists, as an arsenal which sup- plies arms and ammunitions to Communist guerrillas, primarily in Colombia, Venezuela, and Guatemala, and as headquarters for So- viet espionage, propaganda and infiltration In the Americas. Today, two and a half years after the Oc- tober missile crisis, the fortification of the Island continues under the direction of So- viet experts. Military installations are still being constructed or enlarged, some of them connected with reinforced caves and tunnels, or with the deep bays of Cuba. ` the Cuban underground has recently' re- pm-ted the arrival of a great variety of highly sensitive electronic equipment from the So- viet Union, supplementing those previously Installed in Cuba. It is very difficult to de- termine at this `time the purpose or implica- tions of this electronic buildup. However, it is pertinent to recall that the Senate Pre- paredness Subcommittee of the United States disclosed not too long ago that "the potential exists to establish electronic warfare capa- bilities based on Cuba," and that "potenti- ally, Cuba is a base from which the Soviets Could interdict our vital air and sea lanes. It can now be used for the air, sea, and elec- tronic surveillance of our military activities in the Southeast United States and the Caribbean." (Interim report on the Cuban military build-up issued by the Senate Pre- paredness Subcommittee, May 9, 1963.) IV. WHAT TO DO Faced with this grave challenge, what can we do? The majority of freedom-loving Cubans do not expect, nor desire to turn back the clock of history, but rather look to the fu- ture for opportunities to attain social and economic progress and political stability un- der freely elected governments. With this In our mind and in our heart, we shall con- tinue to exercise our inherent right to struggle against oppression. This right, which is also a solemn obliga- tion, shall not be relinquished now as it was not relinquished during the 30-year struggle against Spanish colonial rule. Re- sistance against the Cuban Communist re- gime shall continue through all possible means, including sabotage, infiltration and psychological and guerrilla ?warfare; with full knowledge that the odds are now against us, but with the firm conviction that the will of our freedom-loving people shall ulti- mately prevail. Our objective is not only to recover our national independence and our right to self- determination, but also to prevent a major world conflagration which would certainly ensue if international communism is allowed to endure in Cuba and to make new inroads upon Latin America. As we continue this bitter struggle, we trust that this great country will honor the 1947 Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance and the 1962 Congressional Joint Resolution on Cuba, whereby the United States committed itself to "work with the Organization of American States and with freedom-loving Cubans to support the as- pirations of the Cuban people for self- determination." From this powerful and generous country we expect the recognition of our belligerence and the aid consistent with its national in- terests and worldwide commitments. International communism cannot and will not separate us. In times of peril and in times of peace, in times of sorrow and in times of joy, in times of despair and in times of hope, we shall remain united. For Cuba and the United States are indissolubly linked by geography, history, and the com- mon ideals of freedom and progress under God. WATER SHORTAGES Mr. MOSS. Mr. President, I have ad- dressed the Senate on several occasions during this session on the question of water shortages and the urgent need to increase our supplies of potable water. We must redouble our efforts in solving the problems of pollution. We must conserve our water through control of evaporation. We must experiment with weather modification in order to pro- vide more Wafer. We must divert from It Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 26674 Approved EeMehaffit3Rie9ackitt RD gpalir6R000500M045e-74 20, 1965 surplus areas to water deficient areas. We must desalinize our sea water and convert our brackish water into fresh, ? pure water. We must work with our neighbors to bring water from remote areas of the continent into the dry areas of this great North American Con- tinent. Today, I wish to call the atten- tion of the Senate to recent publications on water and suggest that they be read In full. The first is the October 23 issue of the Saturday Review which contains a series of articles under the general head- ing, "The Crisis in Water." Since the articles are lengthy, I do not ask that they be reprinted in the RECORD, but I highly commend them for reading by my colleagues. I would hope that all of them could read the articles in there by Stewart Udall, Wallace Stegner, Glad- win Hill, and John Leer, as well as re- gional reports from various areas of our country. The second is an article that appears in the current issue of the U.S. News & World Report, and is an interview with General Cassidy, the Chief of the Army Engineers. I ask unanimous consent that the article in the U.S. News & World Report be printed at this point in the RECORD. There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: WATER PROBLEM IN UNITED STATES?WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT Ir: INTERVIEW WITH THE CHIEF OF THE ARMY CORPS OF EN- GINEERS (NOTE?Is the United States running out of water? Will water troubles keep getting worse? Isn't there anything the country can do to assure adequate supplies of water, ready at the tap and free of pollution? What about floods? Can water problems be solved by trapping flood waters and then releasing them later when shortages threaten? These and related questions are on the minds of millions as water problems?drought, floods, pollution?Spread across the country. To get authoritative answers, U.S. News & World Report invited Lt. Gen. William F. Cassidy, Chief of Army Engineers, to its conference room for this interview with staff members.) Question. General Cassidy, as population skyrockets on the east coast, on the west coast, and in other areas, is there to be a water problem of major proportions in this country? Answer. I would say that there are ma- jor water problems right now. There are parts of the United States, most of them in the West, where the balance between water supply and demand is now and always has been precarious. And now In a part of the country where we have always thought of water as being abundant we are faced with a difficult problem. Question. Do you mean in the East? Answer. That's right. Question. Is? the problem in the East one of water supply or proper utilization, or both? Answer. Both. The drought has lasted for 4 years. But, basically, there is sufficient water in the East?both surface water and ground water. But some of the sources have become heavily polluted and are no longer usable. There is pollution by industry, pol- lution by municipalities, and there is salt- water pollution. All these things are going on in the East, where we see a metropolitan area taking shape that stretches all the way from. Boston down to Norfolk. To meet the needs of this vast strip city in the future, we must spread out and have a fully planned program of water development. At the same time, we can't overlook prob- lems that are developing all across the United States. Unless we get busy now, some parts of the country will face serious short- ages by 1980, because by then our demand for water is going to double. And then demand will almost double again by the year 2000. Question. What should be done to assure all parts of the United States enough water In the future? Answer. Proper water management is the key. That means many things: pollution control and pollution abatement to protect the quality of water; transfer of water from one river basin to another; storage of heavy runoffs so that we prevent floods and, at the same time, save water for future use. Cer- tainly the drought in the East illustrates the need for proper water management. Question. Is the East going to face more severe shortages of water in the future than the West? Answer. Not if water use and development is managed properly. There is more water in the East than there is in the West, so that, cared for properly?and this very definitely means conservation and pollution control? the East can go a long time before it becomes as short as the West. Question. Where are the shortages most serious? Answer. The areas of most serious short- age, taking them by basins, are these: the upper Rio Grande and the Pecos; the south- ern California area, although the California water plan will go a long way toward solving that problem; the upper Missouri area. These are the areas that will suffer the earliest shortages, if we think of the way those areas would like to develop in the future. Their development may be limited by water shortages. Question. When you listed the basins which face the worst shortages, you didn't mention the Delaware or the Hudson. Why pot? Answer. We were talking about severe water shortages. That area is not short on water. It requires development and proper management. As you get out in the West, it becomes a question of amount of water potentially available for development. WHAT THE EAST CAN DO? Question. Is the vast metropolitan area from Boston to Norfolk going to have to shift to some elaborate water plan such as the one in California? Answer. I think they will have to come to combined systems of water management. Now we have individual systems of manage- ment. In northern New Jersey, for instance, there are many, many water companies. The problem there, if they're going to continue to supply the growing area, is for those peo- ple to get together and acquire and manage water, so that they can alleviate the short- ages that might come in years of drought. Basically, the problem is in the size of the water-collecting agencies. They don't have enough water within the area to run through a period of drought, so they'll have to reach out for more water and for more storage of water. Question. Are there going to have to be more large dams and reservoirs in the East? Answer. Yes, there will have to more storage facilities and more development. There is a large amount of underground water in those States which can be tapped more heavily than it is at present. There must be a great effort in the Eastern States toward pollution control. This is one of their major problems. The water in many areas is now unusable without very heavy treatment. Question. Take New York City. The Hud- son flows by with plenty of water in it, yet the city has a water problem. Why? Answer. Well, that has been mentioned quite often, but, if we go way back in history, we find that Henry Hudson was looking for fresh water as he sailed up the Hudson, but he found it was salt. The Hudson opposite New York City has a high salt content from the ocean. It isn't until you get pretty well up the Hudson that you begin to get water fresh enough for use. You see, that river is tidal all the way to Albany. But the Hudson will not become a good watersupply stream until pollution is abated. Question. Where are new dams and reser- voirs needed in the East? Answer. Let's take the Delaware basin as one where we have a going project: Now, the Delaware serves a four-State area, and for many years the States tried to get to- gether to solve their water problems on the Delaware. A study by the Corps of Engineers was authorized, and took quite a few years to carry out. In order to prepare the compre- hensive plan it produced, we not only had to work with the States and get their full agreement on what would be done within the basin, but we had to work with all of the other Federal agencies concerned with water, so that we would come out with a truly comprehensive plan. The plan that has been worked out for the Delaware basin contem- plates many headwater developments, and it contemplates, also, major storage dams down lower in the valley. Question. By headwater development, do you mean dams on tributaries? Answer. On tributaries, and on some quite small tributaries. These run into the hun- dreds, so that there will be the water stor- age in the upper areas and then major stor- age down in the lower basin. Tocks Island? near the Delaware Water Gap?is the largest one of these reservoirs. The proposed system of Federal reservoirs will provide a flow of a billion gallons a day from storage reservoirs during low-water periods. The total basin plan will provide almost double this supply. Question. Would it meet the current emer- gency? Answer. It would meet the current needs if the system were built. Question. How much is this plan going to cost, over all? Answer. The major Federal reservoirs called for by the plan will cost about a quarter of a billion dollars. To construct- all of the reservoirs contemplated by the comprehensive plan will require expenditures exceeding a half billion. Additional large expenditures will be made for nonengineer- ing activities. Question. If the drought in the Northeast continues for another year or two, will that part of the country face a crisis of disaster proportions? Answer. No, there is time to head off dis- aster. For the immediate future, if the drought continues, wells can be drilled to take care of northern New Jersey. Camden can probably take care of itself by drilling wells, too. Philadelphia could move its Del- aware River intake upstream, or other mess- ures--such as releases of upstream water? could be taken to hold the salt water wedge below the present intake at Torresdale. Question. How about New York City? Answer. New York City will have to con- serve its water supply. I believe the city's best solution to another year of drought is to begin to correct its water system so as to conserve all the water possible. I think water meters would help, too. For the long range in the Northeast, as far as the Federal Government is concerned, we are expediting the Delaware project as much as we can. Here we're talking on the order of 1969 and 1970. Question. Does desalting of water offer an alternative, or a supplement, to the kind of projects that you've been describing? Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67,1300446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26.: CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 2630$ CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? SENATE October 18, 1965 ? high scbool.., in order to finance her tui- .gon ,:itrictig `renege-in Galesburg, Ill. ,After 'grad:nation from. Knox College, in 1859,_ PIUS Sorinns taught until 1866, When she joined her brother in Detroit to *bit fa the Detreit Tribune. The neXt irio.WWagjo Oleverand 5.n then, tO,OilifOrriia where shelived 'for the rest Of her life. -Ili:inks' tOMias Scripps, the , , San ,plego area is genermitly endowed With university and hospital facilities, libraries and community centers. All of this amply illustrates her 'attention to eriVironinent and education as crucial COrieeinS .6,` The; ..PeePle BUSh*Ille, Ill., are in- debted to. t Tien 'nth:wiling Scripps for a community .building and a 'Park. Such gifts are Infinite& greater than the cost Of Onatthctien. They 'represent an in- elchaustible inVeStrrient in the well-being Of the town and of many generations of its.people. I Can think. of no finer me- Mortal tO a hoble and generous lady. TALKING stNtt ABOirr conA 6p6p} Mr. SMATHERS. Mr. President, not too many days ago Cuban Premier Fidel Castro announced that he would permit a nuniber Of his countrymen to leave for the United -States.- It can be assumed that "Castro afibarentlY counted on using the pepple. he betraYed as baWns in a prOtiagarida.kiniie7 .146Wever, on Octo- ber '3, President Johnson announced the Vnited States Would offer sanctuary to the Cubans, in' line 'with Our traditional humanitarian policies. This entry must be handled on an orderly basis. I am Lure 'that Cash:6; 'realizing -the United ' States 'Will reqUire blear groUnd rules, is noW'hesitating., , .,, Vertainly a;CeritinuatIon.df the Dun- kirkltyle .evacuation cannot be allowed. Greater Miami, which has already dem- Ohstrated its compassion by absorbing Many thousands of Cuban exiles, under- standably .does net know what to ex- pect." et some rroridians and the Nation shcipld get some aris*ers and the United States should spell out its requirements. The Miami Herald has commented on . . - , the subject with cogency and restraint. sI ask unanimous Consent that an 'edi- torial entitled, "Clear. Up the' Refugee Muddle' be inserted In the body of the RECORD at this ,,point of my remarks. ' ? There. being nO"- Objection, the article .. . , Waa ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows:. ,..,,.. . ...?,- , : .ty-Ltr...,As.yr THE REFUGEE MUDDLE . The- promise of mad Casty() to let his be- - trayed people go'has given the United States an =paralleled opportunity. ' iirOperly handled, the bearded dictator's abject failure will be demonstrated for all - the world to see' and communism will be given a setback in this liemiaphera from which it can never "rebound: .-Bungled, it will giVe Matti) a sharp propa- ganda weapioir "to-tighten his control over a nation whose'edoriblitjt is rotting. . , , , I'De iniSid.vaiietnres "Cit' 6vii 'g-roujii of 'Im- patient exiles Vilicriiied to reacue friends and relativa -show how easily the Situation could. be nuntiect: ' ' - '" ? ,,,One, group ehtiged in ?a.." shoot-out with duDap, Coastal' guitrds. 'One ? Odle was woUnded, -,One?luard reportedly killed. 'The indident gives Castro a made-toorder ex- _ . , cuse to slam the door shut again whenever this suits his purpose. Another group embarked in a stolen boat and while in Cuba was used for anti-Ameri- can propaganda. The Havana radio quoted them as complaining about condition in the United States, which had given them refuge. These things must not be allowed to con- tinue. Ten days after Fidel Castro announced all Cubans were free to leave the country, no U.S. official has yet spoken out firmly and clearly to lay down ground rules for an orderly movement. South Florida's huge exile population doesn't know what to expect. Many, there- fore, try to make the best deal they can to get their people out of Cuba. This is an invitation to disaster. Greater Miami doesn't know what to ex- pect?whether we face a chaotic future or whether the Federal agencies intend to keep their promise to relocate the incoming tide and reduce some of the exile burden we al- ready have. Some authority must spell this out and make clear also that U.S. laws and regula- tions must De observed by exiles and Ameri- can citizens alike.' This is no time to appeal to Fidel Castro to act like a reasonable person. He knows now his offhand speech was an incredible mistake for his cause and could depopulate his country. His interest is in trying to rectify his error. The interest of the United States is to show that, given the opportunity, the people of Cuba choose freedom. This would be the end for Fidel. He is on the hook and the United States has the initiative. If we allow the situation to drift until he can squirm off, the hopes of the Cuban people will be dashed and thier eventual freedom postponed again. Let the proper officials speak up now and the U.S. position be made unmistakable. THE EQUAL TIME ABSURDITY Mr. SCOTT. Mr. President, an im- portant question which I hope Congress can consider next year is whether to amend or eliminate section 315 of the Federal Communications Act. I am pleased that the National Conference on Broadcasting and Election Campaigns, held recently in Washington under the auspices of the Fair Campaign Practices Committee, Inc., dealt with this issue. As the author of S. 1287, a bill to amend section 315 of the Federal Communica- tions Act, I am keenly interested in the matter of the equal time on the air for candidates for public office. An excellent editorial identifying the shortcomings of section 315 as it is pres- ently written appeared in the Philadel- phia Inquirer of October 8, 1965. I ask unanimous consent that this edi- torial be printed in the RECORD. There being no objection, the editorial was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows. THE EQUAL TIME ABSURD/TY Section 315 of the Federal Communica- tions Act requires broadcasters to give candi- dates for public office equal time on the air. This means that a station which wants to give major candidates an hour of free time to present their views or engage in debate must give equal time in comparable time slots to all the other minority candidates, In concept, this-regulation appears demo- cratic and noble enough in purpose. In practice, it can prove unfair and absurd, as can be plainly witnessed today during the mayorality campaign in New York. There are two major party candidates for the office: Jokix V. LINDSAY, who holds both the Republican and Liberal nominations, and Abraham D. Beame, the Democratic nomi- nee. Running also are five minority party candidates. The best known of these is the Conservatives' William F. Buckley, Jr. Others are the nominees of the United Tax- payers' Party, Socialist Workers Party, the Socialist Labor Party, and even something called the Losers' Party. Should the broadcasting stations in New York plan coverage of the two or three im- portant candidates, outside of the regular newscasts exempt from the law, they would have to clutter up their schedules, and the air, with equal coverage of all the other can- didates, no matter how obscure and how re- mote their chances of election. Because of the expense involved, the sched- uling difficulties, and public indifference to the views of most of the minority candidates, the stations have naturally gone slow in extra coverage of the top candidates. The stations are frustrated, the campaign loses a sparkle it might otherwise be given, and the public loses out. The equal-time provision has become an added incentive to anonymous characters and political crack- pots to run Mr office for the sake of per- sonal publicity. They know that if one can- didate receives free air time, they, too, must obtain it. The practical answer lies in modific ? of the FCC provision so as to bar a rdities as well as discrimination. Pennsylvania's Senator HUGH 8COTT is sponsor of a bill which would make the equal time regulation apply only to parties which received 10 per- cent of the vote in the preceding election. This would seem to be a reasonable compro- mise, but the Scott bill lies in the bottom of the bin in a Senate committee. The debacle in New York provides a good reason for resurrecting it. ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL Mr. FULBRIGHT. Mr. President, October 11, 1965, marked the 100th anniversary of the founding of the George Washington University Law School. Today, as the 15th oldest law school in the United States, it ranks sixth in enrollment. To honor this institution and its dis- tinguished alumni, many of whom have served and are currently serving in Con- gress, our Federal Courts and through- out the Government and Armed Forces, a special convocation was held on Tues- day, October 12, 1965, at which Asso- ciate Justice William Joseph Brennan, Jr., of the Supreme Court of the United States, received the honorary degree of doctor of laws, and delivered the address of the evening. Being an alumnus of the George Washington University Law School, and a former member of the Law School fac- ulty, I wish to make available to my col- leagues in the Congress and to those who read the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Justice Brennan's remarks on this occasion. I ask that the statement be printed in the Appendix of the RECORD. There being no objection, the state- ment was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 18, 1965 Approved,Eor Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 WNGRESSIONAL RECORD -- SENATE 26307 hundreds of millions of dollars to carry out more than a dozen projects in this area. But in the same densely populated urban eorapleX, an interstate highway is planned. It Is sorely needed to break a traffic strangle- hold Which is delaying economic and social progress throughout the region. It would be built with Interstate Highway funds, 90 percent supblied by the Federal Govern- ment. The highway would pass through or near a number of urban redevelopment areas. This causes local officials to insist that, in order to avoid construction of a Chinese wall through the communities, the freeway should be built below existing sur- face level. This, the Federal Bureau of Public Roads refused to do. According to the Bureau, It wOuld cost the highway trust fund an ad- ditional 85 million. Arguing the local case for a depressed freeway, officials pointed to the obvious evidence of dilapidated residen- tial and commercial areas alongside an ele- vated railroad structure which is located only a half-mile from the site of the pro- posed freeway. Here, they said was proof positive that an elevated structure can de- press property values and help create new slums. Only an ingenious financial solution ar- rived at by State highway officials in cooper- ation with city officials saved the day and permitted the freeway to be built at a lower level. This is an absurd situation. The Federal Government, through HHFA, would be pay- ing out of one pocket for urban redevelop- ment at 20 times the cost of depressing the highway through these urban renewal areas. Clearly, these Federal programs are in con- Alia. Two Federal pocketbooks are in- volved, one, the loan and, grant fund of the Urban Renewal Administration and the other the highway trust fund of the Bureau of Public Roads. Because the immediate de- cision involved highway design, the Bureau of Public Roads was the tail which wagged the urban dog. Clearly, this situation will not be helped one iota by elevating HHFA to the same status as the Department of Commerce, in which the Bureau of Public Roads is housed. Rather, a referee is needed in this dispute between urban redevelopment priorities and highway location and design. A White House office manned by persons with extensive ex- perience in State and local problems would seem to be a more appropriate umpire. There are other problems, too, in the urban scheme of things, with regard to the relative place of highways and rapid transit plans. Some months back, the White House re- lea,sed a technical report prepared by a group of experts which suggested, in part, that more express buses, operating in reserved traffic lanes, might be mass transit's answer to the growing problem of traffic jams that tend to strangle our metropolitan areas. Conceivably, the Mass Transportation Act now on the books, will yield not nearly as much an increase in rail passenger facilities as it will a significant increase in express buses on our highways. There is clearly no objection to locating mass transit programs under the Housing and Home Finance Agency. But a signifi- cant increase in the number of buses on the streets would quite obviously affect what anOther agency of Government is trying to do to combat air pollution. And this is un- der the jurisdiction of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Today, these activities of the Federal Gov- ernMent are administratively unrelated. Nor would they be related under the proposal submitted by the President and approved by Congress to create a Department of Urban Affairs and Housing. Beyond this, duplication and waste would Inevitably follow if mass transit plans are centered in the new Department while an- other Federal agency, the Department of Commerce, continues to guide, finance, and control the construction of urban and sub- urban roads. We cannot divide responsibility and ex- pect sound decisions for the most efficient use of the taxpayers' dollars in meeting over- all community needs. Nor will the new Federal Department help you in your efforts to wage a war on poverty. For the new Department created In part to establish a more direct line between Wash- ington and the cities will do absolutely noth- ing, per se, to make you partners in the ad- ministration of local antipoverty programs. Beyond that, how many of you have seri- ously considered how you are going to find your increased share of funds?a 40-percent increase?required by law if the poverty pro- gram is to continue beyond August 20, 1966? The program calls for Federal assistance for the development, conduct, and adminis- tration of community action programs up to 90 percent of costs for the 2-year period ending August 20, 1966, or 50 percent there- after. Local governing bodies, to say nothing of city managers, are generally bypassed by the direct contact between poverty officials in Washington and local action groups, but where will the pressures go for continuation of the program with 40 percent less Federal participation? Why, the pressures are just as liable to end on the desk of the city managers?and you know it. You are going to be hounded by a public acclimated to the program. But you will be asked to find the money for a program in which you have participated not at all. Now, the purpose of my comments has not been to detract one iota from the important role the Federal Government can, and must, play in solving metropolitan problems; rather, I hope that I have left with you today a healthy skepticism regarding the Federal Government's ability to offer instant solu- tions to perennial metropolitan problems. The same administrative hurdles that have impeded solution of these problems by State and local officials are merely multiplied by the current trend of Federal intervention. Instead of a proliferation of agencies at the Federal, State, and local levels with overlapping jurisdictions and built-in self- interests, can't we begin to talk about inter- jurisdictional planning agencies that will benefit from the knowledge, finances, and energies of all three levels of government as they seek common solutions to problems that are indeed the common property of us all regardless of where we live. If an Office of Community Development in the White House could be designed to accomplish this goal, I feel we would be taking a real step in the proper direction. WEARY OF ALL DEMONSTRATIONS Mr. BYRD of West Virginia. Mr. President, for those of us who support the administration's policy in South Vietnam, it is heartening to know that not all the opponents of that policy be- lieve in public demonstrations or pro- Communist protests. The Wheeling, W. Va., News-Register recently has voiced opposition to the ad- ministration's policy on South Vietnam but an editorial which appeared in the Sunday,' October 17, 1965, edition voices stronger criticism to protest demonstra- tions. I ask unanimous consent that the edi- torial be printed in full in the RECORD. There being no objection, the editorial was ordered printed, as follows: WEARY OF ALL DEMONSTRATIONS Regardless, Of one's personal views on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam war, there can be no condoning the type of pro- test demonstrations being staged around the country. To tell the truth we are sick and tired of all demonstrations, marches, riots, and dis- orders and we believe the majority of Ameri- cans are weary of the same. By now it should be clear that even the most sincere and honest of these protests sooner or later become the vehicles for infiltration by pro- Communist agitators, wild-eyed beatniks, and ordinary law breakers. On Friday the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee released a study to support what it termed the Communist infiltration and exploitation of the teach-in movement on U.S. policy in Vietnam. The report read, "A substantial Communist infiltration (of the teach-in movement) is demonstrable, a much more substantial in- filtration is probable, and there has been a tragic blurring of the distinction between the position of those who oppose our involve- ment in Vietnam on pacifist or idealist or strategic or other grounds, and those who oppose our involvement in the war because they are Communists or pro-Communists." Simply because a movement of this nature is sponsored by an institution of higher learning does not mean that it is free of Communist taint or exploitation by extrem- ists and even hoodlums. Many a worth- while cause has been terribly damaged be- cause of such infiltration and Americans are becoming increasingly disgusted with such mob tactics. There is nothing wrong with speaking out in disagreement with Government policies, but there is no need to resort to mass rallies in the streets, sit-in demonstrations and dis- orderly conduct which disturbs the peace and welfare of the country. Already we have spawned such shocking episodes as seeing young Americans tearing up their draft cards and, rebelling against military service. Unfortunately, the protest movements set an example for our younger people and in a way many of these efforts directly involve the youth. What must be remembered is that half of today's world population is under 18 years of age. By next year half of the U.S. popu- lation will be under 25. Youth therefore is a potentially explosive force, which unless channeled into productive paths, can lead in the future to upheaval and rioting for the mere thrill of rioting. If there is no way left in our Nation to register a dissenting opinion, other than through civil disobedi- ence and mob tactics, then we are in a sad way indeed. ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF ELLEN BROWNING SCRIPPS Mr. DOUGLAS. Mr. President, I should like my colleagues to note that to- day is the anniversary of the birth of Ellen Browning Scripps, one of the most intelligent and selfless ladies our coun- try has known. I want to take this occa- sion to express the pride and gratitude with which the people of Illinois remem- ber Miss Scripps, for her belief in the power and glory of education, a belief which she supported by inestimable philanthropies. Ellen Browning Scripps was born in London on October 18, 1836. Her family moved to the United States while she was still a child, and she spent her girl- hood in Rushville, Ill. She attended public schools in Rushville, and taught school herself after graduation from Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 October 14, 1965's CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX tically and wait for the poor to help them- selves. Industrialization, which needs for- eign aid, creates a new demand for farm products and helps the farmer progress from peasant to entrepreneur. Any schemes for agricultural improvement will create an addi- tional need for foreign exchange, and will be strangled at birth unless aid is forth- coming. But the aid-givers could give a greater part of their help in ways that stim- ulate agricultural reform without appearing to be an undue interference in the recipient's internal affairs. The FAO in its latest report suggests that more aid should be given for general schemes of agricultural development, rather than for big projects like irrigation dams. UNTAD (the 'United Nations Conference on Trade and Development) may also help agricultural reform if it can generate a new breed of international commodity agree- ments that force primary producers to con- trol production of surplus commodities. Were there a genuine prospect of output limitation by the producers, importing coun- tries might more easily agree to finance the support of the international market. The International coffee agreement has begun to move hopefully in this direction with the aid of the World Bank, although the polit- ical difficulties 61 controlling coffee pro- duction in a country like Brazil are enor- mous. Also in the air are the schemes, mostly of French or European Common Market ori- gin, for using planned surpluses of food- stuffs grown in the rich countries in a pur- poseful way to aid development in the poor. The FAO commented that, though the idea is controversial, a choice does not exist be- tween avoiding, or deliberately planning for a surplus, but only between whether a sur- plus willy-nilly is planned or unplanned. "Prom that point of view, planned food aid may be preferable." This at least may be some consolation for the hungry, but one must remember they cannot eat words. Only the rich can. Castro's Latest EXTENSION OF REMARKS otr HON. CORNELIUS E. GALLAGHER OF NEW rEllstx IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENtATIVES Thursday, October 14, 1905 Mr. GALLAGHER. Mr. Speaker, the magnanimous offer by President John- son to admit refugees from Castro's regime is in keeping with the spirit of American concern for oppressed people everywhere. This action is a concrete example of our Nation at its best, offering itself as a haven for those persons who desire true freedom and relief from tyranny. I think that the following editorial from the Newark (t4 J) Evening News is a fair representation of the praise and support elicited from many private citi- zens and newspapers throughout the country. I respectfully submit it for the RECORD; ASTRO'S LATEST PMICWA 4.21.1.Ason acted in the interest of humanitarianism in offering refuge to Cubans wanting to come to this country. He could have done no less. The motive behind Fide Castro's sudden ? decision to open the gates remains unclear. Whatever it may be, he cannot escape the obvious admission of failure which the de- parture of those voluntarily leaving the land of their birth would represent. Efforts will be made in Washington to pace the flow by limiting the number of refugees to 5,000 a month. If this influx were to continue, Cubans could account for half of the 120,000 immigrants from the Western Hemisphere who would be permitted to enter the United States under the newly enacted legislation. Even though this could impose a barrier to prospective citizens from friendly hemi- spheric nations, the desire to maintain the United States as a haven for the oppressed should be transcendent. Safeguards must be employed, however, to prevent Castro from undertaking a wholesale eviction of unem- ployables and others burdening the Cuban economy. The International Red Cross would be the ideal intermediary to assure that humani- tarian considerations prevail. Castro's re- fusal to deal with the Red Cross or some equally disinterested third party would be a sure sign of bad faith and a signal to call the whole thing off. A Trip Behind the Iron Curtain EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. EDNA F. KELLY OF NEW 'YORK IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, October 14, 1965 Mrs. KELLY. Mr. Speaker, as chair- man of the Subcommittee on Europe of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, I always seek out new information from those who travel behind the Iron Cur- tain, in those countries in the Common- wealth of Russia and those nations within the scope of the Subcommittee on Europe. The article which I insert in the REC- ORD today is by William J. Farrell, a college classmate of my late husband at Columbia College, New York. Mr. Far- rell was a: stockbroker in iNTew York City until the stock market crashed in 1928, whereupon he left for the west coast and became associated with banking inter- ests in California. During these years he served his country in both major en- counters, World War I and World War IL Now retired, Bill Farrell is devoting his time and energies to travel and writing. His most recent trip was made to the Balkan countries. Although an upcom- ing article on this recent trip is not yet completed, I have gathered various pieces of information concerning free- dom of religion in these Iron Curtain countries, from correspondence with him. The principal, personal contacts he made were with guides and a few hotel clerks, most of whom were young boys and girls?university students on sum- mer vacations. They were obviously well schooled in what they were to answer to questions about religion. They claimed freedom of religion existed but stated that religion was practiced mostly by older people. He was told that young people were not interested in religion be- cause they were much too occupied with other activities and had no need for it. A5813 He then asked a few of these young People if church attendance would hinder their advancement in the party. Most denied this vigorously. However, he reached a very few who replied guardedly that the practice of any religion would not be of any help to them in advancing their positions. Upon visiting two services on a Sunday in the heart of Bucharest, he found 16 people attending a Roman Catholic Mass in St. Joseph's Cathedral at noon and nearby, 20 people attending an Orthodox service. Obviously and regrettably, freedom of religion is a freedom not easily enjoyed but rather guardedly practiced, if prac- ticed at all. Now, in order to share with my col- leagues, the wealth of observations con- tained ? in William Farrell's excellent account of his 1964 trip, I present his ar- ticle, "A Trip Behind the Iron Curtain": A TRIP BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN - (By William Farrell, retired staff member) JUNE 30, 1964.?The magic date had finally arrived. This meant retirement and enough time to make a trip I had been working over in my mind for almost 2 years. The nucleus of my plan was to join a group in Moscow which would continue an addi- tional 3,000 miles into central Asia. We would visit such legendary cities as Alma Ata, Tashkent, Bukhara, Samarkand, and Dushanbe (called Stalinabad before Stalin's fall from favor). Literally dozens of inter- esting sights are to be seen in these cities, all of which bear the impressive marks of their antiquity. Earlier stops on my itinerary?the World's Fair, a tour of southern Ireland (after a flight from New York to Dublin), and an- other tour of the Shakespeare country in England?were incidental. So were the stops on the return from central Asia at Copen- hagen, Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Paris, and up and down the Rhine. My focal point was the Russian trip. Central Asia is truly a storied land. Its beginnings predate written history. Alex- ander the Great captured Samarkand in the 4th century B.C., to be followed around the 13th century by Genghis Khan and Tamer- lane, Each city I intended to visit was an im- portant link in the ancient "silk road" ex- tending from China to southeastern Europe. The whole area, at present made up of some half-dozen Soviet republics, lies about 2,500 to 3,000 miles southeast of Moscow, east of the Caspian Sea (south of Siberia), and di- rectly north of Afghanistan. When we were at Alma Ata, during a trip through the mountains, we were assured that we were only 35 miles from the border of Red China? Sinkiang Province, to be exact. The great barriers of the Hindu Kush Mountains and the Pamirs lie to the south. Until the ad- vent of the jet, travelers had described this as one of the most ina,cessible spots on earRtrhio'r inquiries, about the area, brought suggestions that September would be the most pleasant month as far as weather con- ditions were concerned and this proved to be the case. I found that midsummer tem- perature in Tashkent, Bukhara and Samar- kand sometimes reach a high of 120? F. September 1 found me, on schedule, at London Central Airport as the PA system droned out the familiar, "Your attention please?Aeroflot flight No. 032 nonstop to Moscow, now loading at gate No. 4?all aboard please." I hope I never lose the thrill I get when the flight being called is my flight?and this was something special. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A5814 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX October 14, 1965 Aeroflot is the airline that operates all nOndillitary flights for Russia, both domes- tic and foreign. My plane was a TU-104, called a Tupolev. It flies at 500 to 550 m.p.h. and is approximately the Russian version of our 707 or DC-8, seating 70 to 100 persons. Close examination of the interior revealed that our planes are more luxuriously furn- ished, but the noise from the jets did not seem remarkably greater?at least as I re- call it. Three hours and forty-five minutes later we landed at Moscow airport. There I joined tour No. 50, made up of 23 other people who would be my traveling companions for the next 17 days. Ours was an English-speak- ing tour. England, Scotland, Canada, United States, and Italy (a young couple) were represented. A young Russian girl, about 25 years old, named Nina introduced herself as our Intourist guide. She would remain with us to handle all details of our trip until we returned to Moscow on September 17. Intourist, by the way, is a government bu- reau which supervises all travel and hotel accommodations within Russia. At each city visited, we were to be joined by a local _guide to explain sights of interest. Immigration officials scrutinized our pass- ports and special visas very carefully; how- ever, the customs section didn't even ask us to unlock our luggage. They did require us to list carefully all foreign currencies and any gold or silver jewelry. We found that sb.utterbugs could have themselves a "ball." Picturetaking was completely unrestricted, except at airports, railway stations, and mili- tary installations. As we drove toward Moscow from the air- port, we noticed the great number of four-, six-, and eight-story apartment buildings. This is a partial answer to one of their most pressing problems?housing. This same situ- ation prevailed in all the central Asian cities visited?new apartments and business build- ings?everywhere new construction. The long booms and control cabs of the construc- tion cranes were silhouetted against the sky, much as palm trees dot the Los Angeles sky- line. The main streets of Moscow are notably Wide, in most cases accommodating 12 traffic lanes, with a broad center dividing strip Which was usually planted with flowers. We also noticed that these streets were kept spotlessly clean. Apparently there are no litterbugs in Moscow. As yet, ordinary traffic is not heavy enough to tax these facilities, but passenger buses by the hundreds ply the streets in all directions. Our hotel was the Ukraine, built 6 or 7 years ago. With two 12-story wings and a central tower of 27 stories, it contains 1,100 rooms arid covers an entire city block. The Russians refer facetiously to its style of architecture as "post-Stalin." The lobby of the Ukraine (and this may be said generally of all the hotels where we stayed) was huge, plain, dull, and poorly lighted. In the guest rooms, the plumbing was strictly antique. I still wonder where they managed to dig up such a collection of curi- osities. In some hotels the wash basin would be in one room or small' compartment, the shower or tub in another, and the toilet in a third. I always enjoy a good game of hide and seek, but not when I'm looking for the bathroom. However, I admit that all our rooms were clean and comfortable, if you forget the plumbing. To sum up on hotels, they would be about fourth class in this country. If you are the finicky type, you'd better stay home. Room service, for in- stance, doesn't exist. In each hotel, we were assigned the same tables for the duration of our stay, and the same waitresses served us throughout. The tables were always set with baskets of assort- ed fruit an.d four or five large bottles of nim- eral water, orangeade, or fruit juices. Tap water was not potable. There were no menus and no tips. Breakfast was a varia- tion of cereals, eggs, ham, bacon, toast-- the usual. However, one morning I didn't recognize the first offering on my plate; it was a smoked sturgeon. I ate it and liked It, although it was a radical departure from my ordinary breakfast routine. The follow- ing morning it started with a plate-filling slab of cheese surmounted by four generous slices of salami. Chalk up another radical departure. In Moscow we were served generous por- tions of caviar at dinner three nights. Each meal also brought a large plate of sliced white bread and black bread. After one sam- ple everyone ate the black bread. It was delicious. It was not quite as heavy as pum- pernickel and always ovenfresh. Although lunch was usually built around a hearty, space-filling soup, the dinner menu was var- ied. It might be beef, veal, lamb, or other meats prepared in conventional ways, or per- haps a shashlik at which the central Asians excel. Boned roast chicken was also a fre- quent favorite. In addition to these stand- bys, various vegetables were served along with potatoes or rice. Desserts were much the same as ours, but ice cream always was our favorite. It was excellent. These back- ward people haven't yet discovered that ice cream can be made without cream. Five days of sightseeing in Moscow pretty well covered the conventional sights. We saw the Kremlin?twice from the inside? and the metro (subway) with its marble platforms, arches, decorative statues, murals done in mosaics, and paintings. We also saw many museums, cathedrals, the univer- sity, and the Exposition of Soviet Economic Achievement?a collection of beautiful buildings, somewhat reminiscent of the New York World's Fair. Each industry and re- public has its own building for exhibiting its products. On September 6 we left Moscow for Alma Ata, arriving there 5 hours and 20 minutes later. When Russia took over the central Asian cities, they followed a general policy of preserving the native quarter of the city, which is composed mostly of mud huts. They built their own new buildings a short dis- tance away. So, it is still possible to observe life, in these ancient quarters, very much as it has existed for many thousands of years. Some of the mud huts are gradually being re- placed by modern construction, but a large portion will always be preserved for tourist appeal. Alma Ata and Dushanbe do not contain any distinguished landmarks. Tashkent is a city of over a million population, located in the center of a large cotton-producing area. One of the largest cotton mills in the world is located here. A small percentage of the people still wear attractive and colorful na- tive costumes. We were getting toward the end of our journey with visits to Bukhara and Samar- kand, the ancient Marcanda. Bukhara is known best for the rugs bearing that name. Actually, the rugs are made elsewhere, but the principal market is Bukhara. Until 1920, the Emir ruled with a cruel and an absolute hand. Sometimes criminals were thrown into the bug pits to be slowly de- voured. Prominent on the skyline is the tall and beautifully proportioned Kalyan Minaret. Condemned men were taken to the top of this tower, known as the Tower of Death, and pushed off, falling to their deaths on the stone flags 130 feet below. Here we also saw the Timor Tower, Job's Well, and many other impressive struc- tures. Our, last stop in Bukhara was a mosque where we were permitted to enter during a religious service. The worshippers prostrated themselves on their prayer rugs, which they had spread in the open air in the tree-covered courtyard on the mosque. Here again the feeling of remoteness from the world and the vast distances from "regular" civilization possessed us. When you get so deep in the far placed. that the Mohammedans turn southwest to face Mecca, you know your're more than 45 min- utes from Broadway. Samarkand offers a wealth of interesting places. Among them is the Observatory of mug-Beg, the astronomer. His records, compared with present-day findings, show an amazing accuracy. The Our Emir, or Tomb of Tamerlane, is located here. Tamer- lane's sarcophagus is made of a mineral called nephrite and is said to be the largest single piece of this material ever known. For his epitaph, he chose to have inscribed, "Were / alive today, mankind would trem- ble." The Shah I Zind is long stairway, flanked on both sides by a succession of the beautiful tom,bs of Tamerlane's family. These are probably the best preserved of the various grcura. Registan Fquare is formed by a collec- tion of mosques and madrasahs or schools. Its impressive blue and blue-green tile domes had fallen i'-to disrepair, but one, which had been expertly restored recently, offers the hope that the entire group may soon receive like treatment. Lord Curzon, visiting in 1888, spoke of It as "the noblest public square in the world," superior even to St. Mark's Square in Venice. Dushanbe was the last stop on our tour. The hotel dining room was "undergoing repairs," so we ate at a large restaurant opposite the hotel and across the main public square. It must be the largest pub- lic square in all Asia. On our last night in Dushanbe, Intourist gave up a farewell dinner, featurirg much caviar and cham- pagne. The next day a 6-hour, nonstop trip in an IL-18 returned us to Moscow and the National Hotel?reputedly the best in Moscow. At least the National and Metro- pole, products of the turn of the century, are highly recommended by old Moscow hands. I think they are right. The next morning, September 17, the group broke up and each member enplaned for his separate destination. Two of us left Moscow -early on our SAS flight to Copen- hagen. On our departure, as on our arrival, cus- toms showed no curiosity about our luggage. However, the same immigration official, who had scrutinized our travel documents so closely on arrival, .was again on duty at the clearance desk to repeat the process in great detail. When our passports were returned, we noted that the special visa, which had been carefully stapled to that document, had been as carefully removed. We walked downstairs to the loading level and were about to start up the plane's gang- way when a voice at my elbow asked for my passport. It was our old friend again, but this time he was accompanied by a pretty blond girl, who joined in the inspection. They went through the whole ceremony again, just as seriously and carefully as he had done it not much over a minute before. He finally returned the passport and indi- cated that I was free to board. Obviously, no one is going to switch passports in the brief interval between the desk and the plane, and get off scot free from behind the Iron Curtain?not, at least, while "Ivan Horatius" is guarding the bridge. Arriving at Copenhagen Airport, we care- -fully sought out a customs or immigration officer. There was none to be found. , We made inquiries. Still no officials. There was nothing to do but call a cab and go to the hotel. Needless to say, I felt neglected. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B0044613905-4 October 14, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX where sugar has never been grown. Their lobbyist succeeded in securing a 10,000-ton special quota for Owen- Illinois. Arguments that American consumers would be without sugar if the bill failed to pass were also without foundation in fact. Under existing legislation the cur- rent quotas would continue to apply if the House had voted down the proposal. With the defeat of HR. 11135, we could then have come up with a bill which would have permitted domestic sugar " producers to expand their output with no ties to foreign quotas. A Significant Vote in the U.N. EXTENSION OF REMARKS or HON. EDWARD J. DERWINSKI OF ILLINOIS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, October 14, 1965 Mr. DERWINSKI. Mr. Speaker, it is necessary for us to consistently remind the State Department that the greatest abuses of colonialism today are found In the Communist colonial practices of the Soviet Union and Red China. I regret that Ambassador Goldberg did not use the opportunity during the recent U.N. debate on Rhodesia to emphasize that the only major colonial powers were the two Communist dictatorships, the U.S.S.R. and Red China. However, columnist David Lawrence, writing in yesterday's Evening Star, directs our attention to this question, and I insert his column in the RECORD at this point as part of my remarks: A SIGNIVICANT 'VOTE IN THE U.N. (By David Lawrence) An event of tremendous significance has just occurred in the United Nations. By a vote of 107 to 2, the General Assembly has called on Britain to refuse to accept a declaration of independence by Rhodesia, because the latter's present government will not grant a majority of the inhabitants self- rule but will continue to give a white minor- ity.the preponderant power. - While there is a widespread feeling that the black man in Africa should have his rights, the incident raises the question of why the same principle shouldn't be applied to the people of other countries where a white majority have been and still are being denied the right to rule themselves. Thus, for example, the populations of Poland, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Ru- mania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia are overwhelmingly white, but their independence is impaired by an out- side power which holds them in subjugation under "Communist colonialism." . The fact that the General Assembly of the United Nations now is insisting on self- government for different nations throughout the world which have been ruled by outside powers is an encouraging sign. The captive nations in Eastern Europe, however, have never had the benefit of a United Nations resolution declaring that they should enjoy independence and be allowed to develop au- tonomonsly without interference from other governments. Certainly the United Nations has never advocated the use of "all possible force" to deal with this problem, as it has just recommended with respect to Rhodesia. In the case of the satellite countries in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union supposedly gave independence to this bloc of nations but nevertheless has managed to retain con- trol through the apparatus of the Commu- nist Party and often with military forces. The Russians try to spread the impression every now and then that these Eastern Eu- ropean countries are independent and can make trade arrangements with other parts of the world. But the fact remains that they do not really have self-government. So any pronouncement by the United Na- tions today with respect to the right of self- government for the people of Rhodesia, the majority of whom happen to be black, could be taken to mean that the world's biggest international organization may soon express itself in favor of the principle of self-govern- ment for white people who have came under the yoke of the Soviet Union in Eastern Europe. It is significant that the United States voted for the resolution to hold up the grant of independence to Rhodesia by Britain, and in a friendly understanding with the British Foreign Office has undertaken to work in harmony with the authorities there. Pres- sure is to be brought to bear on the Rho- desian whites to prevent them from becom- ing independent under a government which, it is argued, wouldn't reflect the will of the majority of the people. There are nearly 4 million tribesmen, mostly uneducated, and 250,000 whites possessing skills of various kinds. The State Department here has indicated it will participate in economic sanctions whereby trade would be cut off and aid of various kinds would be interrupted if the Rhodesian leaders insist upon separating themselves from the British and going it alone. But, it will be asked, just why shouldn't Britain and other countries be willing to apply the same formula to Red China? For the Peiping regime has undertaken to pre- vent a majority of the people in South Viet- nam from maintaining their independence? The United Nations has, in effect, ap- proved all measures of economic or military force that may be necessary to insure the independence of Rhodesia under a govern- ment chosen by a majority of its people. This gives hope that in the future perhaps the same concern will be felt and similar measures adopted to insure the right of the majority of the people of Vietnam to govern themselves without interference by a minor- ity aided by Red China or the Soviet Union or any other country. Some day, too, per- haps the peoples of Eastern Europe will be helped by the United Nations to regain the independence they once enjoyed. Reporter Everett Allen Cited for Coverage of Cuban Freedom Movement EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. HASTINGS KEITH OF MASSACHUSETTS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, October 14, 1965 Mr. KEITH. Mr. Speaker, the mount- ing exodus from Castro's Cuba is a dra- matic reminder that Cuban men and women are willing to risk their lives and give up lifelong homes for exile and un- certainty to find freedom. It should remind us too that their sons, brothers, and husbands have suffered Imprisonment and death in the fight to free their island home of Communist tyranny. The tight continues. A5819 Sunday night, in. New York City, two major free Cuban organizations in this country reaffirmed their determination to see Cuba returned to the family of free nations. In so doing, they paid spe- cial tribute to several American journal- ists for their help in exposing Castroism and bringing the story of the free-Cuba movement to the American people. I am proud to note that special tribute was paid a resident of my congressional district, Everett S. Allen, a staff writer for the Standard-Times of New Bedford, Mass., who has written penetrating articles on the Cuban situation since 1959. Everett Allen and the newspaper for which he has written many prize-win- ning articles, the Standard-Times, very early saw the menace of Castroism. Allen characterized Fidel Alegandro Cas- tro Ruz as a "pistol-toting drunkard," and termed ,him a "power-hungry des- pot." The Standard-Times was one of the first, if not the first major American newspaper to explode the Castro myth and expose him as a dangerous pro-Com- munist despot. In 1959, when the Amer- ican Society of Newspaper Editors in- vited Castro to be their principal speaker at an annual meeting, the editor of the Standard-Times urged that the invita- tion be withdrawn. When it was not, he refused to attend the meeting and con- tinued to warn his readers of the true character of Castro?this at a time when most other newspapers were writing of Fidel as a colorful liberator of the Cuban people. In 1962, Mr. Allen wrote a major four- part series on Castro, a series 4 months in the preparation and one which was based in large part on exclusive inter- views and correspondence. Accepting his award in New York last Sunday, and a similar tribute in behalf of former U.S. Ambassador to Cuba Arthur Gardner, Mr. Allen told the Cuban patriots they must have patience in addition to their courage?"patience deriving from the knowledge that we in North America who believe Cuban liberty is of the greatest fundamental import- ance to all mankind will stand with you for as long as history requires." Mr. Speaker, I include in the RECORD the account of this award ceremony, as a reminder to all of us that the passage of time has done nothing to diminish the cause of a free Cuba, or to lessen the danger to the Western Hemisphere from this Communist camp in the Caribbean: STANDARD-TIMES WRITER HONORED?CUBA EXILES VOW To CONTINUE FIGHT NEW Yorac, October 11.?Several hundred anti-Castro Cuban exiles, representatives of two major free-Cuba organizations in the United States, reaffirmed their determination to "continue the fight until our beloved country is free again" at a 3-hour public rally here yesterday. A highlight of the event, coinciding with the start of National Newspaper Week, was the awarding to nine American daily news- papers, four Spanish-language publications, and three U.S. magazines of "diplomas of honor" for coverage "in defense of the brave and valiant men and women who struggle to free Cuba from the tyranny of Commu- nism and to reincorporate our republic in, the family of free nations of the American Continent," ? Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 A5820 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ?APPENDIX In addition to Everett S. Allen, staff writer of the New Bedford, Mass., Standard-Times, who was cited, other publications represented by the awards included the New York Daily Nag's, New York Herald Tribune, New York World Telegram-Sun, Miami Herald, News- day, the Miami Daily News, Washington Star, Reader's Digest, Time, and Life. Other individuals accepting the awards included Marguerite Higgins, whose column appears on the Standard-Times editorial page, and Ben L Meyer, Washington bureau chief Of the Associated Press. In accepting his award, Mr. Allen, also rep- resenting former U.S. Ambassador to Cuba, Arthur Gardner of Washington, who was unable to attend, assured the audience, "You have the courage; you must have the pa- tience required, patience deriving from the knowledge that we in North America who be- lieve Cuban liberty is of the greatest funda- mental importance to all mankind will stand with you for as long as history requires." The sponsoring organizations, Free Cuba Patriotic Movement and the Christian Demo- crat Movement of Cuba, concluded the affair by calling on the United States to charter a vessel to be named "Freedom Ship, to bring over from the Red inferno that is Cuba to- day, those seeking freedom, to be reunited (in the 'United States) with their families." Senate-House Conference on the Public Works Appropriation Bill Fails To In chide $300,000 for Fremont Dam of the Lower Teton Project =TENSION OF RENIARKS OF HON. GEORGE HANSEN or /DAM) TFIE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, October 14, 1965 Mr HA.NSEN of Idaho. Mr. Speaker, Idaho has fared well in the public works appropriation bill for 1966 as agreed to in conference between the House and Sen- ate, and which passed the House today. Included was $11,844,000 for five impor- tant projects in my State, four of which are in the Second Congressional District. These Projects, and the amounts appro- priated for them,. are: Dworshak? Bruces Eddy?Reservoir, $11 million; Portneuf River and Marsh Creek, $400,000; Ririe Reservoir, $300,000; Heise-Roberts extension, $100,000; and Blackfoot Reservoir, $44,000. Funds for the -Bilge and Blackfoot Reservoirs are for planning, while the rest are for con- Struction. However, Mr. Speaker, I must say I was naturally disappointed that the Senate-House conference on the public Works appropriation bill, in its wisdom, did not Include the $300,000 provided in the Senate version of the bill for the Frerriorit Dam of the lower Teton proj- ect. It Is a good project, and one I believe to be of vital necessity to the residents of the area. 1Vir Speaker I am sure Members of the , House are aware of the great rampart of Motintains?sometimes called the Amer- ican Alps?which lie south of Yellowstone National Park, and along the Idaho- Wyoming border. These towering peaks Of glacier-filled crevices, and of breath- taking"beauty, are called the Tetons and form a major part of Teton National Park. It was in the shadow of the rising sun under this majestic vertebrae of Mother Earth that I was born and reared. Flowing out of these high places are crystal clear but swift and turbulent streams. Coursing through deep canyons the waters from the fast-melting snow in the spring emerge and flow out upon the broad, flat valleys below, inundating everything in their path. Later in the year, as the heat of summer reaches its peak, the snowpack recedes to a point where little melting occurs, and the streams slow to a trickle. Thirsty crops are too frequently left to wither in a land of little rain. These conditions have worsened as times have changed and as the area has become more highly developed. Lands that can provide abundant yield year after year remain irregular and unpredictable and economic conditions have worsened for some 30 years. The proposed Teton Dam is primarily and initially designed to provide supple- mentary water and to control spring flooding. In House Report No. 1715, 88th Con- gress, 2d session, accompanying H.R. 2337, a bill to authorize this dam we find: This is a multipurpose development designed to make maximum use of the avail- able water resources in the area. The con- struction and operation of this proposed project would provide irrigation service to 151,400 acres of irrigable land. About 114,400 acres are in a highly successful irri- gated agricultural area and would receive a supplemental water supply. The other 37,000 acres which are presently dryland farmed would receive a full water supply. The project would also provide substantial flood protection to a highly developed area in the Upper Snake River Basin, which has suffered severe damage from floods in recent years; make available about 75 million kilowatt-hours of electric energy annually for project pumping and for disposal through the Federal Columbia River power system; and, in addition, would provide new recreational opportunities in the area. For the past 30 years, water users as well as businessmen in the Fremont-Madison Ir- rigation District, an area which is subject to both drought and floods, have been urg- ing the construction of a dam and reser- voir on the Teton River, At the present time, there are only two small reservoirs for water storage in the area, and the water which is impounded is subject to prior downstream rights. The canals which serve the Fremont-Madison Irrigation District lose their natural flow early in the irriga- tion season resulting in late season water shortages. A supplemental water supply for the existing irrigated land in the district is the greatest need in the area. This area is completely dependent upon agriculture, and the frequent crop losses due to drought conditions have a serious adverse impact which is felt not only by the local economy but throughout the entire State. The new land which would be brought into irrigated production would be a great asset to this area, strengthening and firm- ing up the economy and providing for di- versified crops on lands presently devoted to dryland grains. This same area, for which Arm water sup- ply is so badly needed, is also subject to serious flooding. Floods and drought con- ditions in the same year are not uncommon. The spring floods in many years cause in- undation of farmlands, homes, and areas of October 14, 1965' improvements, as well as threaten the life and health of humans and livestock. Sub- stantial economic losses have occurred. The seriousness of an alternate drought and -flood cycle was vividly illustrated in 1961 and 1982. During the summer of 1961, Fre- mont and Madison Counties were declared a drought emergency area. In February 1962 extremely high runoff caused record floods in Henry's Fork and Teton River val- leys and the Snake River plain. Thus, within 6 months, the same area was de- clared a drought area and a flood disaster area, Destructive floods occurred in the area just a few weeks before the committee held hearings on this legislation in June. The committee was impressed with the ex- tent of damage indicated by photographs furnished during the hearings. A large per- centage of the ftoodflows that have been so damaging are contributed by the Teton River, and storage space in the proposed Fremont Reeervoir would provide substan- tial protecVon against future floods. Electric energy that would be made avail- able would be an additional valuable asset that is needed to meet the ever-expanding power requirements. At the prePc?t time, recreation facilities in the area are taxed to the limit. The recrea- tional opportunities that would be made available by construction of this project in the form of boating, camping, fishing, etc., would help meet the increased demand. Mr. Speaker, support of this project - has been completely bipartisan. The first bill on it was introduced by the late Senator Henry Dworshak in the 87th Congress. It was later reintroduced and cosponsored by Senators FRANK CHURCH -- and LEN B. JORDAN in the 88th Congress on the Senate side, and by my predeces- sor, Representative Ralph Harding, on- the House side. It currently has the, wholehearted support of the entire Idaho congressional delegation. Twice the Idaho State Legislature has - memorialized the Congress in its sup- port. Following is the text of Senate Joint Memorial No. 5, Idaho State Leg- islature, 38th session, in such support; SENATE JOINT MEMORIAL No. 5 Joint memorial to the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled, and the Hon- orable-President of the United States We, your memorialists, the members of the Senate and House of Representatives of the Legislature of the State of Idaho, assembled in the 38th session thereof, do respectfully represent that: Whereas the 88th Congress of the United States of America, by an, act approved Sep- tember 7, 1964, entitled Teton Basin Recla- mation Project, Idaho, and known as Public Law 88-583, 78 Stat. 925, authorized to be appropriated for the construction of the Fre- mont Dam and other facilities of the lower division of the Teton Basin Federal recla- mation project the sum of $52 million plus or minus justifiable amounts for ordinary fluctuations in construction costs and for operation and maintenance costs: and - . Whereas said project received the over- whelming support of Congress and all--per- sons in the affected areas, of both political faiths, as being necessary and within the public interest to arrest the flooding waters of the Teton River and its tributaries by the construction of a dam and reservoir to use the impounded water, most of which in high runoff per4ods in the past has gone rushing down through the lower valleys eroding val- uable farmlands and damaging and destroy- ing homes and other properties; for the irri- gation of arid and semiarid lands, the devel- opment of river power opportunities, the providing for recreation facilities, and the Approved For Release 2003/09(26.: CIA-RDP67B0;0446R0 0500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 August 16, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE selves generously to the National Red Cross. Mr. FASCELL. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 1 minute. As I stated earlier, we are not getting a precedent by a governmental contribu- tion to the International Committee of the Red Cross, because some 59 govern- ments do now contribute. Admittedly, this is the first time the United States would make a voluntary contribution as a Government to that society. The National Red Cross societies themselves do,make individual contribu- tions from their awn societies. So far as I know, that would likewise continue. With respect to the necessity, this is, of course, a matter of opinion. I respect those who have different opinions. As pointed out in the hearings on pages 8 and 9 and as pointed out in the report, the request for funds to help with budg- etary problems did come from the inter- national committee in 1963 and was fol- lowed up by specific requests to all gov- ernments to increase contributions, Including the U.S. Government. This is the reason why this was initiated by our own Department of State. The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. YATES). The question is on the motion of the gentleman from Florida that the House suspend the rules and pass the bill H.R. 8715. The question was taken; and (two- thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were suspended and the bill was passed. A motion to reconsider was laid on the table. frviy AMEND _TULE ?RELATING TO CLAIMS AGA,INST CUBA Mr. FASCEJ4L. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 9336) to Amend title V of the In- ternational Claims Settlement Act of 1949 relating to certain claims against the Government of Cuba. The Clerk read as follows: Jill. 9306 Be it enactql by the House and Senate of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, Thar section 501 of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 (22 U.S.C. 1643) is amended by striking out "which have arisen out of debts for merchandise furnished or services ren- dered by nationals of the United States with- out regard to the date on which such mer- chandise was furnished or services were ren- dered or". - SEC. 2. Section 503(a) of such Act (22 1643b(a) ) is amended by striking out "arising out of debts for merchandise fur- nished or services rendered by nationals of the United States WW/Ceut regard to the date on Which such merchandise Was furnished or services were rendered or". SEC. 3. Section ,506 of such Act (22 U.S.C. 1643e) is amended by striking out ": Pro- vided, That the deduction of such amounts shall not be construed es divesting the United States of any rights _against the Government of Cuba for the,appliats so, 4OC11,1Qted", Sc 4, Section 50(0 OT Such Act (2'2 U.S.C. 16441) is amended by striking out together with a 'statement of the evidence relied upon and the reasoning employed in reaching its decision". SEC. 5. Section 611 of such Act (22 U.S.0 1643j) is. amended to read as follows: "APPROPRIATIONS "SEC. 511. There are hereby authorized to be appropriated such sums, not to exceed $750,000, as may be necessary to enable the Commission to pay its administrative ex- penses incurred in carrying out its functions under this title." The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. YATES). Is a second demanded? Mrs. BOLTON. Mr. Speaker, I de- mand a second. The-SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection a second will be considered as ordered. There was no objection. Mr. FASCELL. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 9336 which is to amend title V of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 relating to certain claims against the Government of Cuba. In the last session of Congress a simi- lar bill was passed by this same body authorizing the adjudication of claims by U.S. citizens against the Castro goy- 'ernment. In the closing days of last year's session, the other body voted out a bill which differed from the House version. On the last day of the session and for no other purpose in mind other than to have Cuban claims on our statute books, we reludantly accepted the Sen- ate version. H.R. 9336 is similar to the bill passed last year. An authorization for an ap- propriation for adjudication expenses is limited to $750,000, and is the same as provided by the House version last year. When a settlement with a free and inde- pendent Government of Cuba is agreed upon and paid, the United States will be reimbursed for the administrative ex- penses in the adjudication of these claims. The enactment of this legislation is not to be construed as any intention to au- thorize an appropriation now or in the future of Federal funds for the purpose of paying the claims of U.S. nationals against the Government of Cuba. This bill provides only for the receipt and determination by the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the amount and validity of claims of U.S. nationals against the Government of Cuba. The other amendments referred to in this bill are substantive and relate to the principles of international law and do- mestic laws; such as, statute of limita- tions, and laches. More than 5 years have -passed since the Castro government began confiscat- ing the property of U.S. nationals and prompt adjudication of claims would be in the best interests of all concerned. H.R. 9336 provides the necessary au- thority to set the machinery in motion for an orderly determination of the amount and validity of claims of U.S. na- tionals against the Government of Cuba while the means of documenting and supporting such claims are still available. Adjudication of such claims have been delayed because of a lack of an appro- priation. If this matter is further de- layed, witnesses and claimants may die and records may be lost, thus making It Increasingly difficult to substantiate claims. Moreover, the prompt receipt 19705 and determination of amounts and valid- ity of the claims will provide the De- partment of State with an accurate rec- ord for use in any future negotiations. For these reasons, I urgently recom- mend that H.R. 9336 be passed by the House. Mrs. BOLTON. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Iowa [Mr. Gsossl. Mr. GROSS. Mr. Speaker, I desire to commend the gentleman from Florida [Mr. FASCELL] for this bill. I served on the subcommittee which considered this legislation. I think it is good legislation and ought to be passed. The SPEAKER pro tempore. There being no further requests for time, the question is on the motion of the gentle- man from Florida that the House sus- pend the rules and pass the bill H.R. 9336. The question was taken; and (two- thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were suspended and the bill was passed. A motion to reconsider was laid on the table, GORGAS MEMORIAL LABORATORY Mr. SELDEN. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (S. 511) , with amendment to increase the authorization of appropriations for the support of the Gorgas Memorial Labora- tory. The Clerk read US follows: S. 511 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That, effec- tive for fiscal years ending after June 30, 1963, the first section of the Act entitled "An Act to authorize a permanent annual appro- priation for the maintenance and operation of the Gorges Memorial Laboratory", ap- proved May 7, 1928, as amended (45 Stat. 491; 22 U.S.C. 278), is amended by striking out "$250,000" and inserting in lieu thereof "not to exceed $500,000". The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is a sec- ond demanded? Mrs. BOLTON. Mr. Speaker, I de- mand a second. The SPEAKER pro tempore. With- out objection, a second will be considered as ordered. There was no objection. Mr. SELDEN. Mr. Speaker, S. 511 would increase the annual authorization for appropriations for the Gorgas Me- morial Laboratory from $250,000 to $500,- 000. The laboratory was established in 1929 through legislative agreement between the Governments of the United States and the Republic of Panama. Since that time the Gorgas Laboratory has been performing a valuable, needed service in research in tropical diseases. Its re- search activities also have implications which extend beyond the tropics. Many of the human and animal diseases that flourish in tropical regions are also found in, or may spread to, the temperate zones. The laboratory collaborates with many other research and public health orga- nizations, including the Middle America Research Unit, a laboratory in the Canal Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500000005-4 19706 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE August 16, 1965 Zone operated by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in col- laboration with the Water Reed Army In,stitute of Research. The Gorgas Memorial Laboratory, lo- cated in Panama City, Republic of Pan- ama, is the operating research establish- ment of the Gorgas Memorial Institute, a private, domestic, nonstock corpora- tion. U.S. contributions to the labora- tory started in 1929 with an annual per- manent authorization of $50,000. The authorization for the laboratory was in- creased to $150,000 in 1949, and $250,000 In 1959. In 1960, the Congress author- ized $500,000 for the construction of new facilities at the laboratory, making it one of the best equipped of its kind in Latin America. The additional author- ization provided for in this bill will make it possible to fully utilize these new facil- ities. The Gorgas Memorial Laboratory has an international reputation and a long standing record of service in the western hemisphere. The Republic of Panama has cooperated closely with the labora- tory in the achievement of its objec- tives. The management of the institute has administered the funds made avail- able with prudence and care. The Board of Directors meets annually with- out compensation and determines poli- cies of the institute. An advisory group of noted scientists assists in developing the research program. There are 26 members of this group, primarily doc- tors, and 23 of them represent U.S. institutions. Accordingly, Mr. Speaker, I urge that the House act favorably on this measure to permit the Gorgas Memorial Labora- tory to carry on its important work. Mrs. BOLTON. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume. Mr. Speaker, it is a great pleasure for me to have the honor of presenting this bill. The Gorgas Laboratory has been doing for many years an outstanding job. It has been a remarkable demonstration of what willing, dedicated people can do to blot out diseases, particularly trop- ical diseases, such as are found there. General Gorgas himself was a most amazing man; kindly to a degree and his heart as big as the world. It seemed very fitting when the Laboratory was es- tablished that it should take the form that it did. It is a very great pleasure to me to approve the bill. Mr. HALL. Mr. Speaker, will the gentlewoman yield? Mrs. BOLTON. lam glad to yield to the gentleman. Mr. HALL. Mr. Speaker, I should like to commend the committee, and in par- ticular the subcommittee, for bringing out this bill upgrading the Gorgas Me- morial Laboratory. As has been well said here by the gentleman from Ala- bama [Mr. SELDEN] and the gentle- woman from Ohio [Mrs. BOLTON] this memorial laboratory is an outgrowth of the successful attempt of this country to build the Panama Canal. It is from stroll sources, and the discovery of "yel- low-jack" and the vector for controlling malaria, that the Memorial Laboratory was organized on a gradually evolving and cooperative basis between Panama and this Government, our Army Sur- geons General and the great men of preventive medicine such as Gorgas him- self, Cummings, Reed, Rickets, Leonard Wood, who was memorialized yesterday at Fort Leonard Wood, having an Army hospital named after him, in which I was privileged to participate, and others. Furthermore, Mr. Speaker, it is note- worthy that all of the memorabilia that were in Cuba which was liberated as a result primarily of some of these early preventive medicines discoveries in the so-called Spanish-American War, had been destroyed by burning in the streets of Cuba, after the Castro takeover. Mr. Speaker, I know personally of the research that has evolved from the Labo- ratory and of the great men of science who have functioned and studied and researched and developed good for hu- manity therein. Mr. Speaker, I strongly support this bill for one other reason, if the gentle- woman from Ohio will yield further, and that is as stated, it cooperates with the Pan American Health Organization which is a subdivision of the World Health Organization in needed matters that do cross international boundaries. But this is uniquely American and West- ern Hemispheric organization and labo- ratory. Mr. Speaker, lest we become too deeply involved in one organization of a strictly "international character" taking over all research and functions, espe- cially under its aegis, in situations par- ticularly unique to the Western Hemi- sphere, Latin America, and our Cen- tral American friends in particular, I strongly urge the support of this bill. (Mr. HALL asked and was given per- mission to revise and extend his re- marks.) Mrs. BOLTON. I thank the gentle- man from Missouri very much for his contribution. Mr. SELDEN. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the distinguished gentleman from Florida [Mr. FAscEml. (Mr. FASCELL asked and was given permission to revise and extend his re- marks.) Mr. FASCELL. Mr. Speaker, in sup- port of the request for the additional au- thorization for the Gorgas Memorial Laboratory, I wish to point out that the great work performed by the laboratory directly contributes to the health of U.S. citizens. As an example, one project currently being worked on deals with migratory birds since there is evidence that viruses such as St. Louis encephalitis and Vene- tuelan equine encephalitis are transmit- ted to the United States by these migra- tory birds. When World War II broke out, and the United States lost its source of quinine and troops in southeast Asia were riddled with malaria, it was the work done by the first director of the lab- oratory, Dr. Herbert Clark, that permit- ted the U.S. Army to prescribe Atabrine safely and in sufficient dosage to control the situation in southeast Asia. I pray to God that no similar problems will arise In South Vietnam, but we must be pre- pared. There is no duplication between the work of the laboratory and other agen- cies. It works closely with the Pan American Health Organization and the National Institute of Allergy and Infec- tious Diseases. The Gorgas Memorial Institute which runs the laboratory also works closely with private institutions; one such program is a graduate research program with Louisiana State University where teachers and graduate students are sent to the laboratory in Panama for short-term periods to pursue work in tropical medicine. Similarly, the insti- tute has close relationships with other American universities?Stanford, Har- vard, and Kansas, to name a few. This aspect of the program will be expanded. The General Accounting Office an- nually reviews the expenditures of the institute and the laboratory, and the Comptroller General's report has been a part of the laboratory's annual report for many years. The GAO has never criti- cized any expenditure made by this worthy enterprise. Mr. Speaker, I recommend favorable consideration of this bill to increase the authorization of appropriations for the support of the Gorgas Memorial Lab- oratory. Mr. SELDEN. Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time. The SPEAKER. The question is on the motion of the gentleman from Ala- bama that the House suspend the rules and pass the bill S. 511, with an amend- ment. The question was taken; and (two- thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were suspended and the bill as amended was passed. A motion to reconsider was laid on the table. FEDERAL BOXING COMMISSION Mr. HARRIS. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 8635) to establish and prescribe the duties of a Federal Boxing Commission for the purpose of insuring that the channels of interstate commerce are free from false or fraudulent descriptions or depictions of professional boxing contests. The Clerk read as follows: MIL 8635 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives Of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SNORT TITLE Szcnox 1. This Act may be cited as the "Federal Boxing Control Act". FINDINGS AND POLICY SEC. 2. (a) The Congress hereby finds that? (1) interstate and foreign communications facilities are being utilized to cover profes- sional boxing matches by broadcasting such matches by television or radio or by dis- seminating such matches by wire to be re- ceived on home receivers or in theaters, arenas, or other places of assembly; and (2) at present, neither State nor Federal governmental authorities have adequate power to assure the proper utilization of such communication facilities in connection with the coverage of professional boxing matches and to protect the integrity of professionaL boxing matches thus covered. (b) It is, therefore, the purpose of this Act to establish a Federal Boxing Commission Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 A4642 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX August 18, 1965 quirements providing control over intrastate traffic in these drugs, and making posses- sion of stimulants and depressants except under specified conditions illegal. As is al- ways the case, if a particular State law or regulation places more stringent controls over these drugs, those requirements must be complied with. DRUGS COVERED Barbiturates and amphetamines are spe- cifically named in the law. However, the law speaks in terms of "depressant or stim- ulant drugs" which also includes any drug which contains any quantity of a substance which Is found to have a potential for abuse because of its depressant or stimulant effect on the central nervous system or its hallu- cinogenic effect. Thus, the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare can bring additional drugs under the controls of the law by regulation. He may also exempt drugs which would otherwise be included within the literal language of the law when the controls are riot necessary for the pro- tection of public health. HEW *Under Sec- retary Wilbur Cohen revealed that the De- partment has been reviewing additional drugs with a view to having necessary regu- lations promulgated by the date the bill takes effect?February 1, 1966. FEDERA,L REGISTRATION Manufacturers, compounders, and process- ors and other firms already registered under the Drug Amendments of 1962 are required to indicate whether they are producing or distributing stiniulant and depressant drugs in their registration statement. The act does add wholesalers, jobbers, and distrib- utors of stimulant and depressant drugs only to the list of firms 'which must register. Wholesalers anti jobbers were exempted from the registration under the drug amendments of 1962. Wholesaling, jobbing, or distributing is de- fined as selling any depressant or stimulant drug "to any person who is not the ultimate user or consumer." The report of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com- mend pointed out that pharmacies main- tained in conformance with applicable State laws are exempted from the registration requirement. Presumably, pharmacists who occasion- ally furnish a medical practitioner with Office supplies or a fellow pharmacist with supplies to replenish his stock pending re- ceipt of an order from a manufacturer or a wholesaler would not have to register; how- ever, a pharmacist regularly engaged in wholesaling ofiThe supplies to physicians or dispensing stocks to other pharmacists would be reqUired to register. Since it Is clear that the law contemplates a complete and accurate record, the pharma- cist must indicate the name and address of the pharmacist or physician to whom he de- livered the supply, the kind and quantity of the drugs involved. The pharmacist (or the physician if he otherwise must keep records under the law) receiving the drugs must also make a record showing the name of the phar- macist from whom received, the kind and quantity of drugs involved, and the date. No registration number is required, because the law speaks of "the registration number, If any, * * *" and pharmacies are not re- quired to register with the HEW Secretary. RECORDS , The Senate Committee on Labor and-Pub- lic Welfare report-notes the intention to "es- tablish controls upon the distribution of depressant and stimulant drugs throughout the chain of distribution, from ;the basic manufacturer to * * * the ultimate con- sumer." Each person handling stimulant and depressant drugs must prepare a com- plete inventory of all stocks on hand as of the effective date of the legislation?Febru- ary 1, 1966?and keep the inventory for at least 3 years. Thereafter, a record must be maintained. For stimulant and depressant drugs re- ceived: the kind and quantity of the drug; the name, address, and registration number (assigned by HEW) of the person from whom received; the date of the transaction. For stimulant and depressant drugs ens* pensed: the kind and quantity of the drug dispensed or otherwise disposed of; the name, address, and registration number (generally not applicable for pharmacists or physicians) of the person obtaining the drug; the date of the transaction. The records must be kept. for 3 years un- less State laws specify a longer period. In most instances, the wholesaler or manu- facturer invoice will comply with the receipt record and the prescription file or patient chart with the dispensing record provided all the required information is available. The law also provides that the HEW Secre- tary shall exempt from the provisions of the act by regulation any drug which may be sold over-the-counter; combinations, which include one or more substances in such quantity, proportion, or concentration suffi- cient to prevent the stimulant or depressant drug from being ingested or absorbed in large enough quantities,to cause the stimu- lant, depressant, or hallucinogenic effect. INSPECTION The record of receipt and disposition of depressant or stimulant drugs must be avail- able for Food and Drug Administration em- ployees to inspect. Pharmacists may main- tain separate flies in much the same manner as is now done for narcotics and where this is clone, both the Senate and House com- mittee reports make it clear that the inspec- tion authority is limited to those separate files. However, the law specifically provides that no separate records need be kept and the records need not be in any special form. Normal business and pharmaceutical records are sufficient. In hospitals, patient order files and patient medical charts are sufficient. In the debate on H.R. 2 on the floor of the House, a colloquy between Congressman HARRIS and Congressman ROGERS of Florida pointed out that the inspection authority is not intended to confer any broader searches than the records for stimulant and depres- sant drugs. The Congressmen agreed that "this does not in effect authorize fishing ex- peditions" of the pharmacists' records. _ In light of the prior congressional denial of inspection authority to FDA agents, .a court will have to rule on whether an FDA in- spector can utilize any evidence he may dis- cover which does not relate to stimulant or depressant drugs where no separate records are maintained. The law and both committee reports em- phasize that no special records need be maintained. This would be effectively nulli- fied if evidence not relating to stimulant or depressant drugs was gathered under H.R. 2's inspection authority and later used against the pharmacist. This would force pharmacists to maintain separate records or relinquish rights they otherwise would have. PROFESSIONAL SAMPLES AND PHYSICIANS The House debate clearly indicates that a record must be made of professional samples of stimulant or depressant drugs obtained from medical representatives. Likewise, the medical representative has to keep a record of the disposition of any professional sam- ples to pharmacists or physicians. This is to preclude the development of a gap in trac- ing the distribution of these drugs. Physicians and other licensed practitioners who regularly engage in dispensing stimu- lant or 'depressant drugs to their patients and who make a charge for the drugs "either separately or together with charges for other professional services" must also keep records of receipt and disposition and make them available for inspection. WHO MAY LAWFULLY POSSESS Manufacturers, processors, and wholesale druggists dealing in stimulant or depressant drugs must register .with the Secretary of HEW and may then lawfully possess the drugs in the usual course of their legitimate businesses. Common carriers and their em- ployees are also authorized to possess the drugs in the usual course of their legitimate business. Stimulant and depressant drugs may lawfully be possessed by (1) pharma- cies; (2) hospitals; (3) clinics; (4) public health agencies which maintain establish- ments in conformance with any applicable local law's regulating the practice of pharma- cy and medicine; (5) physicians; (6) den- tists, and other practitioners licensed by State law to administer depressant or stimu- lant drugs in their practices; (7) persons utilizing the drugs in research, teaching, or chemical analysis as long as the drugs are not for sale; (8) officers and employees of Fed- eral, State, or local governments while acting in the course of their official duties; (9) nurses and other medical technicians who are under the supervision of a practitioner licensed by law to administer stimulant and depressant drugs while acting in the course of employment or occupation and not on their own account; (10) employees and agents of groups (1) through (7) noted above while acting in the course of their employment; (11) patients or a responsible member of the patient's household for his personal use or that of a member of his household or for administration to an animal owned by him or a metnber of his household. PRESCRIPTION ORDERS AND RENEWALS Prescription orders, to comply with record requirements, must contain the name and address of the patient and the date of issue which are the normal requirements for all prescription orders. There is no requirement that the prescription order must be written and signed by the prescriber; stimulant or depressant drugs may be dispensed on tele- phoned or oral instructions according to the usual practice. However, no prescription order can be renewed more than five times and no prescription order can be dispensed or renewed more than six months after the date of issue. If the prescriber indicates a larger number of renewals or a longer duration, the five renewals and six month limit still apply. However, if there are no renewal instructions, then the prescription is nonrenewable. These requirements apply to all prescrip- tions after the effective date of the law re- gardless of the date on which they were writ- ten. After the 5 renewals or 6 months has elapsed, the physician may prescribe addi- tional renewals for a like period. UNLAWFUL ACTS AND PENALTIES Any person who violates the provisions of the act is subject to the penalties of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Con- viction carries a punishment of imprison- ment for not more than 1 year, and a fine of not more than $1,000 or both for the first offense and imprisonment for not more than 3 years and a fine not more than $10,000 or both for subsequent offenses. An additional penalty has been added where stimulant or depressant drugs are sold to a person under 21 years of age. For a first offense, the pun- ishment is imprisonment for not more than 2. years and a fine not more than $5,000 or both, and subsequent violations carry a pen- alty of not more than 6 years imprisonment and a fine of not more than $15,000 or both. Violations include possession of stimulant or depressant drugs except as authorized in the law; failure to prepare and keep an accurate record of receipt and 'disposition of stimulant and depressant drugs; refusal to access to or copying of any of the required records; re- fusal to permit authorized inspections; dis- pensing or renewing any prescription more than 6 months after its date of issue or Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 .? CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 August 18, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD -- APPENDIX A4641 mately succeeded, with a generous assist from the United States, in toppling Ful- gencio Batista's regime on January 1, 1959, and selling Cuba out to communism. It was not until December 2, 1961, that Castro finally acknowledged what was by that time obvious; 1. e., that he was a dedi- cated agent of the international Communist conspiracy. But he declared on that occa- sion: "Did I believe (in Marxism) on 26 July (1953) ? I did believe on 26 July. The mistake the U.S. State Department made in believing Castro was not a Commu- nist in 1953 was only the first in a long series of blunders that continued to charac- terize our policy toward communism in this hemisphere. Whatever reasons there may have been for believing Castro was non- Communist in 1953 or 1959, there is no doubt whatsoever today that he and his regime are disciples of Marxism, and that Cuba is the center for subver:ion in Latin America. The United States, however, is abstaining from even encouraging Cuban refugees in another "26 de Julio" movement that would fulfill the betrayed promise of free elections, democratic government, and liberty for the people of Cuba. The spirit of the 26th of July movement long ago was betrayed by Fidel Castro and his clan of Communist conspirators. The brave, freedom-loving Cubans now have no one to help them revive that spirit. Ending the U.N. Deadlock EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. BENJAMIN S. ROSENTHAL OF NEW YORK IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, August 18,1965 Mr. ROSENTHAL, Mr. Speaker, un- der leave to extend my remarks in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, I include at this point the lead editorial which appeared in the New York Times of August 17, en- titled "Ending the U.N. Deadlock." The possibility that our Government would revise its position had been re- ported in the press recently, and I had previously indicated my strong support of a more flexible position which would remove the deadlock which has paralyzed the General Assembly and affected the work of the United Nations for a year. The editorial follows: - ENDING THE U.N. DEADLOCK Washington's decision to terminate the controversy over Soviet and French peace- keeping arrears was based on a recognition that there was no other practical way to preserve the world organization. The year-long deadlock in the General Assembly demonstrated conclusively that the United Nations could be destroyed, but that it could not be strengthened, by the futile effort to force a great power to contribute to peacekeeping operations of which it dis- approved. Most member countries of the world or- ganization came to this conclusion months ago. For this reason alone, it has been clear for some time that Washington, had no real alternative but to acctpt the majority view. The United States could not set itself up as the sole guardian of the U.N.'s interests, no matter how unassailable its legal position. Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg pointed up the most crucial aspect of the problem yes- terday when he said that "the United States agrees, in light of present world tensions, that the General Assembly must proceed with its work." The need to preserve the U.N. for a possible role in Vietnam as well as the Other troubled areas has made it increasingly ur- gent that the Assembly meet, vote and re- sume normal business next month. 40 The revision of the American position In.. Compromises within the Johnson ad- ministration and in Congress. Some of the strains this created were reflected both in what Ambassador Goldberg said yesterday and in what he left unsaid. One thing left unsaid was what the United States would do to help the U.N. wipe out its $108 million deficit. Britain and the Scandinavian countries have shown the way with unconditional do- nations of $18 million. Washington, pre- sumably, is waiting for the Soviet Union to keep its promise of a "substantial contribu- tion." Washington would have been wiser to state?as Adlai Stevenson urged before his death?that the United States intends to help the United Nations in its finances re- gardless of what other countries do, A similar position might well have been taken in another respect. If the Soviet Union has been wrong to open a breach in the Assembly's authority to assess ,its mem- bers, is the United States right to open this breach wider by emphasizing?before any issue arises?that it "reserves the same op- tion"? Suggesting that Washington might emulate Moscow in this regard is a poor con- tribution to strengthening international morality. The paramount consideration, however, is the need, to end the debt crisis and put the General Assembly. back to work. Eauallv important, the United States has not yielded on the Assembly's authority to initiate peacekeeping operations when the Security Council, which has the primary responsibil- ity, is immobilized by a veto. Voluntary contributions have effectively financed such operations in the past and there is no reason why they cannot in the future. Taken as a whole, the new flexibility in the American position is welcome. It will not resolve all the difficulties that face the United Nations. But, by resolving the pres- ent impasse, it will preserve the world or- ganization for a future in which it can grad- ually again grow in strength. Eccentrics Unnecessary EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. EDWARD J. DERWINSKI OF ILLINOIS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, August 18, 1965 Mr. DERWINSKI. Mr. Speaker, the Des Plaines Valley News, an independent publication serving communities in southeast suburban Cook County, pro- duced a brief editorial in its Thursday, August 12, edition which I believe is a most timely and significant comment on a phase in current civil disobedience actions: ECCENTRICS UNNECESSARY In the flood of those photos of marchers for various movements or demonstrations allied with the Negro cause for equality, the aim for peace for Vietnam, and the rebellion at the college campuses are seen the eccen- trics. These are those bearded, unkempt indi- viduals that in earlier days one Would class as "bums." These seldom bother to wear common attire, but always wear the extreme. They are passionate in their demands. The causes, they suport are sometimes as queer as their apparel. However, note that where some cause gets public attention and TV coverage these individuals are surely seen to be among the other, more dedicated lead- ers of the movement, The citizens that watch are treated with contempt. Apparently this group finds that such oddity catches the attention of the public. One cannot pass judgment on the plight of these individuals but it would do well if the leaders of important causes sort of im- prove their image and exile the eccentrics or face attention of the sort that they rather not have. Praise Due Self-Policing Efforts of Nation's Pharmacists EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. PAUL G. ROGERS OF FLORIDA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ' Tuesday, August 10, 1965 Mr. ROGERS of Florida. Mr. Speaker, as a member of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee, which handled the recently enacted Drug Abuse Control Amendments of 1965, I was pleased to see the efforts taken by the industry to fully effect the provisions of the new law. The American Pharmaceutical Associ- ation has just circulated a reference guide explaining the provisions of the new law to various health practitioners. This effort stands as a fine example of the type of cooperation and initiative needed to curb the illicit traffic in barbi- turate and amphetamine drugs. I include the American Pharmaceuti- cal Association pamphlet in the RECORD at this point: H.R. 2 AND You?A R5.3,ERENCE GUIDE TO THE DRUG ABUSE CONTROL AMENDMENTS OF 1965 FOR HEALTH PRACTITIONERS (Norm?After more than a decade of pro- posals'and hearings, the Drug Abuse Control Amendments of 1965 establish special con- trols for depressant and stimulant drugs. Practitioners of the health professions know the measure as H.R. 2 by Representative HARRIS (89th Cong.), the Dodd bill (88th and 87th Congs.), after its sponsor, Senator DODD, the Boggs bill in earlier Congresses, and the barbiturate and amphetamine proposal.) The American Pharmaceutical Association, the national professional society of pharma- cists, presents the highlights of the new law affecting the health practitioners here. The purpose of this effort is to educate those who must practice under this new law as to the requirements established and acquaint them with their individual responsibilities created under the legislation. We firmly believe that the pharmacists of this country conscienti- ously assume their ethical and legal obliga- tions. The American Pharmaceutical As- sociation hopes this commentary will foster an understanding of the purposes and details of the Drug Abuse Control Amendments of 1965. The Drug Abuse Control Amendments of 1965 amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and place additional controls over stimulant and depressant drugs through increased recordkeeping and inspection re- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 74, Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 August 18, 1965 \ CONGRESSIONAL RECORD -- APPENDIX A4639 In fact as well as any man I have ever known. This did not prevent him, however, from committing his most disastrous political blunder?the attack on the Supreme Court. But, it did enable him to govern New Stork State during the Seabury inyestigation of the late Mayor James ..T. Walker's administra- tion, without assisting Judge Seabury in the least and without favoring the Democratic organization at all. Both sides assailed him. Both called him the man on the flying trap- eze, but neither sensed that he enjoyed that role very much. His sense that his place in history de- pended on what he did for the common man was called demagoguery by his opponents. I just won't accept this at all. I sat in those early cabinet meetings, and I can tell you there was no time for demagoguery. The hour was too late and the days too full of anxiety for any thought other than the welfare of our country. The banks had been closed and reopened, but they were shaky. Millions were jobless and millions were hun- gry. Those pieces of legislation pounded out in the forge of imminent national failure were entrusted in a large measure to me?opera- ting as chairman of the Democratic National Committee?to effectuate on the Hill. Many men took part in their formation?and it is significant as the late Speaker Sam Ray- burn, of Texas, pointed out, that of the 100- odd basic acts?such as labor legislation, banking reforms, securities regulation, social security and many others?not one has been repealed and all have been augmented by both parties in succeeding sessions of the Congress. Accordingly, it is unkind, unfair and untrue to call Mr. Roosevelt a demagog on this score. To be sure, he loved the approval of the people and the lionization by his huge fol- lowing. But who doesn't? Loving applause ahd rabble rousing are two different things. There are two factors which prevented F.D.R. from becoming a rabble rouser. First, and you may believe this or not, he was deeply conservative. He hated to spend public money unnecessarily, and he dreamed of the day he could balance the budget. I shall always remember an evening I spent with him after dinner in the White House as he was going over with me matters on which of necessity required his approval. I,shall never forget when he said if the price of cotton which I think was then 6 cents a pound in the' market could be raised to' 10 or 11 cents, and corn and wheat could be raised from the price offered in the Kansas City markets, comparable with the increase on cotton?and if it were possible to in- crease the national income from approxi- mately, as I recall it, $57 to $65 billion at that time?to approximately $75 billion we would be able to balance the budget?which if my memory serves me correctly?was ap- proximately $7 billion. The public needs, and the necessity of spending held his mind; but close to his heart was the idea of stopping Federal spend- ing as quickly as he could. At the slightest rise in the economic health of the country, he would stop spenditg. In fact, he stopped Vending so abruptly in 1937 that it brought about a recession. Perhaps nothing illus- trates how conservative he was at heart more than the discovery that the ex-presi- dent of the New York Stock Exchange, Richard Whitney, was an embezzler. Had F.D.R. been a demogog, he would have gone to the country screaming, "I told you so," and demanded fuller powers. Ile could have gotten them, too. But he did nothing of the kind. Perhaps it is an index to F.D.R. the man that tears came to his eyes, "I can't believe that Dick would do such a thing," he [mid and added "Poor Groton." They had been schoolmates there. One of his great qualities was to turn reverses into a joke. Thus, when he lost the purge elections, defeating only one opponent, the chairman of the Rules Committee, John O'Connor, of New York, he laughed off his defeat with the marvelous wisecrack, "It was a bad season, but we won the Yale game." Another time, when his executive secretary, the very able James Rowe, urged him to take an action to which he was opposed?accord- ing to Jim Rowe, the President said, "Jim, you've made a forceful argument, but by accident we're not going to do it." "By accident?" asked Rowe. "What acci- dent?" "The accident that the people of the United States elected me President instead of you," F.D.R. laughed. I have told you that he was a man who could throw off a jibe, but there was one which cut him deeply. That came at a time when he was convinced that the country had to prepare for war. Taking the cue from his agricultural plan of reducing craps by a third, the President's foreign policy was described on the Senate floor as a plan to plow under every third American boy. That hurt, hurt deeply, so deeply that it was weeks before he rallied enough to be very angry about it. He liked nothing better than new ideas and interesting people and he especially liked to talk to them over a cocktail at day's end. He fancied himself as a great cocktail mixer, with few equals in martinis, and without parallel in old-fashioneds. He was deeply aware of the prerogatives of the Presidency. He insisted that the great respect for the office be observed because none respected it more than he. Thus, he was annoyed when an autograph seeker pre- sumed to go upstairs in the White House to get it. He refused and ordered him ex- pelled. Although his life had been attempted in Miami, it affected him little. He was a fatalist about that, and as I have previously said, he was deeply religious. He often said, "If they want you, they'll get you, and there isn't anything you can do about it." In fact, it was the Cabinet which intervened to put more protection around him. The Attorney General, Robert II. Jackson, was summoned to the White House one mid- night, and found only one old guard between Pennsylvania Avenue and the Lincoln Room. He protested strongly and after that Mr. Roosevelt consented to more security measures. He, of course, loved the Navy, because of his boyhood sailing days. He also, of course, had been Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President Wilson, a job also held at one time by President Theodore Roosevelt. With his admirals he was in especially close contact. He could take criticising of his other departments very well, but those at- tacking the Navy were on thin ice. He would shut off those critics with a single sentence "What do they know about battle- ships?" His administration has been described as the greatest royal court since Louis XIV. There is a certain element of truth about this. While the President was bold in imag- ination, sivift in execution, and highly knowledgeable about government finance, administration was not one of his strong points. He was little less than grand in his delegation of authority; he was magnificent in backing up the men he appointed, but unfortunately he often appointed two de- partments with sweeping powers to do the same job. This resulted in terrible depart- mental fights, which F.D.R. dearly loved. Since both sides bitterly complained to him, he kept himself, at least, fully informed. His method of reaching policy decisions in those early days is worthy of note. I have for it the greatest admiration. He would in- vite all points of view to the White House for dinner, or immediately thereafter. He would introduce the subject for discussion, and then listen to all sides. Sometime after 11 o'clock he would turn to Miss LeHand and say "Missy, I think this is the best we can do." He would then and there dictate his ideas in a memorandum. All had had their say, and all had a pliecise idea of what the President wanted. Thereafter, very fre- quently, would delegate the job to two com- peting departments, and the fur would start to fly. Nor did his idea of administration stop there. His kitchen cabinet, often had more access than the regular Cabinet. Hopkins and Corcoran were his principal lieutenants after the death of Louis Howe and to the annoyance of many department heads their word was law more often than not. It is in pattern that these two men also ended up at loggerheads as did many of his department heads. This dislike of ordinary channels led him to value new faces and new ideas. In that respect, he was very typical of the age in which he was educated. He had a little knowledge of nearly everything. He was an avid reader, with a great memory, and there was scarcely a subject on which he could not contribute an anecdote or an observa- tion. This accounts in part for his great per- sonal charm. The experts of the country who had spent lifetimes on a particular sub- ject would find that F.D.R. knew enough about it to grasp immediately what they were talking about. This wide range of interest, these smatterings, if you will, gave F.D.R. the ability to be a great and sYmpathetie listener, without which quality he could not have been the justly famous conversational- ist that he was. If he had a single great love, / believe it was American history. On this, he was an authority, as is President Truman. For Mr. Roosevelt, it had the excitement of contest. One could almost see him visualizing him- self on how he would have acted had he been President at that time. He had a genuinely deep affection for our country, re- garding it as the greatest romance of his- tory. That spirit, I think characterized his administrations while I was in the Cabinet. One almost felt the warmth and keen in- terest of the administrations since George' Washington, and here I will say that, in my opinion, there has never been an administra- tion?Republican or Democratic, without it. The Cabinet and the President of the United States are, in our history, majestic, and I never knew a man holding such position who did not give the country the best that was in him. I have no patience with those cynics who believe that there is no such thing as consecrated public service. I have said that it is difficult to separate the man from the work, and it is. But by their works shall ye know them, and if this be the standard, F.D.R. stands anclfored in American history with the rest of our great- est Presidents. As for F.D.R. the man, and myself, I have this to say. Since it is fair to say that we parted on principle, it also follows that we met on principle, the principle of what was best for New York State and later the Re- public. For 12 full years, we saw the result of our labors enacted into laws which still stand as the laws of our country, laws which are now endorsed in the platforms of both parties. Further, the pattern of concern for our fellow Americans has been elaborated to a principal and permanent goal of the Nation. None of these would have been possible without President Franklin Delano Roose- velt. And so, it is my absolute conviction that Franklin Delano Roosevelt the man?can safely rest his case before God, the American people and history?on the works and deeds of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the 32d Presi- dent of the United States. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A4640 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ?APPENDIX August 18, 1965 [From the Detroit (Mich.) Free Press, Aug. 6, 1965] FARLEY CALLS F.D.R. "CONSERVATIVE"--? SPEAKS AT KALAMAZOO KALAMAZ00.?A man politically close to Franklin 13. Roosevelt Thursday night de- scribed the New Deal President as "deeply conservative," a man who "hated to spend public money unnecessarily" and one who "dreamed of the day he could balance the budget." This assessment of Roosevelt came from James A. Farley, his Postmaster General 8 years and, as Democratic national chairman, director of the first two of his four success- ful campaigns for the presidency. The assessment was made in a lecture, "FDR?The Man," prepared for delivery as the last in a series on "The Roosevelt Era," sponsored by Kalamazoo College to com- memorate the 20th anniversary of his death. The Nation's worst depression existed when F. D. R. took office. The world's worst war was raging when he died in office. Farley and Roosevelt split politically when the latter decided to seek a third term. Far- ley opposed more than two for any man, and he said Thursday "severance took place on a basis of principle, not personality." Farley, now chairman of the Coca-Cola Ex- port Corp., prefaced his description of Roose- velt as deeply conservative by saying: "you may believe this or not." "The public needs and the necessity for spending held his mind. But close to his heart," Farley said, "was the idea of stopping Federal spending as quickly as he could. "At the slightest rise in the economic health of the country, he would stop spend- ing. In fact, he stopped spending so abruptly in 1937 that it brought on a re- cession." Farley said Roosevelt liked nothing better than new ideas and interesting people and especially liked to talk over cocktails at day's end. "He fancied himself," Farley added, "as a great cocktail mixer, with few equals in mar- tinis, and without parallel in old-fashioneds. * * "I believe he was gifted with a sense of ' destiny and of leadership," Farley said, "Which stood him and the Nation in good stead in hours of grave crisis." Ticking off landmarks in New Deal legisla- tion, such as social security and banking reform, Farley said "we saw the results of our labors enacted into laws which still stand ? * ? laws which are now endorsed In the platforms of both parties." "And so," he concluded, "it is my absolute conviction that Franklin Delano Roosevelt the man?can-safely rest his case before God, the American people, and history?on, the works and deeds of Franklin Delano Roose- velt, the 32d President of the United States." "His administration has been described as the greatest royal court since touts XIV. There is a certain element of truth about this. While the President was bold in imagina- tion, swift in execution and highly knowledg- able about Government finance, administra- tion was not one of his strong points." The former Cabinet member said "11,e was little less than grand in delegating author- ity," but "unfortunately he often appointed two departments with sweeping powers to do the same job." "This resulted in terrible departmental fights, which F. D. R. dearly loved." [From the Kalamazoo (Mich.) Gazette, Aug. 6, 1965] PARLEY ENTHUSIASTIC OVER BOTH F.D.R., L.B.J. (By Tim Richard) If James A. Farley is enthusiastic about the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt, whom he served as Postmaster General and Democratic National Committee chairman, he is just as -enthusiastic about the works of President Lyndon B. Johnson. "He will go down in history as one of our greatest Presidents," Farley said of L.B.J. "No President has put through as much controversial legislation as Johnson, and in such a short time." The old New Dealer was asked in an inter- view this morning to contrast the personal- ities of F.D.R. and L.B.J. Roosevelt was the Harvard- and Columbia- educated aristocrat, "even tempered, not too explosive. He didn't like criticism; no Presi- dent does. "Like all men, he could be very small at times," Farley said, recalling F.D.R.'s re- fusal to do favors for persons who had of- fended him sometime in the past. "He liked to be told he was tough, but he wasn't," Farley said. Johnson, on the other hand, was born in meager circumstances, received a less elab- orate education in Texas colleges, started as a teacher, then went to Washington as a congressional assistant, Farley recalled. "He's politically minded, and he likes the political atmosphere of Washington," Far- ley said. "He isn't going to try to hurt, he won't attempt punishment, of someone who votes against him." Whereas Farley said unboastfully that he handled F.D.R.'s relations with individual Congressmen?"they knew I spoke with the authority of the President"--Johnson takes charge of congressional relations himself. "His personal relations with Senator Digit- SEN (Republican leader) are as close as with Senator MANSFIELD (Democratic leader)," Farley observed. One exception to L.B.J.'s no-retaliation rule occurred when the President became sensitive to the criticism of Senator PRANK CHrracx, Democrat, of Idaho, over the ad- ministration's Vietnam war escalation pol- icy. Johnson asked CHURCH where he got his ideas, and CHURCH replied he read liberal columnist Walter Lippmann. Farley chuck- led as he recalled L.B.J.'s retort: "The next time you want a dam, talk to Lippmann about it." [From the Kalamazoo (Mich.) Gazette, Aug. 6, 1965] PARLEY DESCRIBES F.D.R. IN TALK HERE (By Rob Warden) James A. Farley, at '77, characterizes Franklin 13. Roosevelt as a man who "rests his case with God, the American people, and history." Speaking Thursday night at Kalamazoo College, Farley commented that he "broke with President Roosevelt because of prin- ciple, not because of personality." Farley, U.S. Postmaster General during F.D.R.'s first two terms, resigned in 1940 because he opposed the idea of a President breaking tradition by seeking a third term. Concluding a lecture series commemorat- ing the 20th anniversary of President Roose- velt's death, Farley called F.D.R. "a deeply good man, and really quite religious." "It is unkind, unfair, and untrue to call ? Mr. Roosevelt ?a demogague," Farley said. "He was deeply conservative, and dreamed of the day he could balance the budget." "Big Jim" was Democratic national chair- man and directed the successful Roosevelt presidential campaigns in 1932 and 1936. He is currently board chairman of Coca Cola Export Co. Farley's talk Thursday night concerned only the first two terms of President Roose- velt, while Farley was a member of the cabinet. Referring to his resignation from the ad- ministration, Farley said, "Men must be very close to have a split between them become first-page news." The public needs and the necessity for spending held Roosevelt's mind, but close to his heart was the idea of stopping Federal spending as quickly as he could, Farley said. "At the slightest rise in the economic health of the country he would stop spend- ing. In fact, he stopped spending so abruptly in 1937 that it brought on a re- cession," Farley recalled. Roosevelt liked to be surrounded by inter- esting people with new ideas and he particu- larly enjoyed discussions with them over a drink at the day's end, Farley said. "Mr. Roosevelt was exceptionally canny and knowledgeable," Farley said, "and he liked nothing better than new ideas and new faces." "He fancied himself as a great cocktail mix- er, with few equals in martinis, and without parallel in old-fashioneds. "His administration has been described as the greatest royal court since Louis XIV. There is a certain element of truth about this," Farley observed. "While the President was bold in imagina- tion, swift in execution and highly knowl- edgeable about government finance, admin- istration was not one of his strong points," Farley added. Farley said Roosevelt enjoyed much more freedom of action in his first two terms than in the last two when "the compulsions of war and of failing health assailed him." Giving his personal estimate of F.D.R., Farley said "I believe he was gifted with a sense of destiny and of leadership which stood him and the Nation in good stead in hours of grave crisis." Farley, who stands 6 feet, 2 inches and weighs 215 pounds, said he admired F.D.R.'s vitality in lieu of the handicap that polio had imposed on him. "In this way," Farley said, "he was like Theodore Roosevelt. They both had great physical vitality, and they both had physical handicaps." President Roosevelt, however, was less than perfect, Farley said. "He often appointed two departments with sweeping powers to do the same job." Looking back 25 years at the history he helped? make, Farley commented that F.D.R. "stands in Amer tory with the great Presidents." Twe ve Years Later EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. EDWARD J. DERWINSKI OF ILLINOIS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, August 18, 1965 Mr. DERWINSKI. Mr. Speaker, as we watch the growing demands of some Communist-infiltrated organiza- tions and other groups of well-meaning but misguided Americans, and as we ob- serve the voices of appeasement within the hierarchy of this administration, it would be practical for us to heed the very timely commentary on history which appeared in the Seymour Daily Tribune recently: TWELVE YEARS LATER July 26, 1953?July 26, 1965. For Castro and his fellow Communists, 12 years of struggle, then triumph, then total, tyrannical dominion over the island and people of Cuba. It was 12 years ago that a 1:land of rebel Cuban youths with Fidel Castro at their head attacked the Moncada Barracks in Santiago de Cuba. This was the first strike in a 51/2-year guerrilla campaign that ulti- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A4702 Approved For ReMKGVERPRACifEtM3M9AKIIRPM0050005-4August 23, 1965 And in its preoccupation with Vietnam, the Ainerican public has failed to notice very sig- nificant and troubling developMents south of the border. ' But events are not only proving that Cas- tro's threats are not so empty, but are also calling into question many of the smug as- suiriptions about developments in such places US Venezuela. ' Any comparisons to Vietnam area are of Course to the earliest stages of that war when victims of terror and ambush were listed by the dozens rather by the thousands. ? ASKOMPTION' IN' ItiTEZITELA With regard to Venezuela:it bas been as- sumed in Washingten that the success 2 years ago in holding free elections in spite of oppo- sition from Communist terrorists had more or less settled he guerrilla problem. After all, it was reasohed the Venezuelan Government was freely ohOsen, left of center, and -very, progressive in social good works. More than moat people on this earth, Amer- icans cling to the myth that good govern- raent is of itself a defense against Commu- nist guerrillas. . Very handily for the Communists, we have been brainwashed into assuming that Com- munist terrorists can thrive only if most of the people are against a government. It is a very unhistbric assumption. In. Europe, the destruction of Czechoslo- vakia's popular and progressive government by a Communist minority is just one of many examples of the fact that the Communists usually take Over in spite of the will of the Majority. , ' YEN5ZTTF4, TASsoN In Venezuela, the lessen is that terrorist guerrillas, if supported from the outside (Cuba) can dangerously increase their troublemaking capacity in spite of good gov- ermilent--a government that has among Other things effectively worked at matters of land reform and helping the peasantry. - As in Vietnam, the peasants of Venezuela may hate the guerrillas, but they will not ex- pose them for fear of torture and death. The discovery of 5 tons of armaments -hidden in the Han Antonio Del Gauche re- gion of Venezuela this week follows a gun battle in the same area between military forces and guerrillas. A secret guerrilla headquarters of the FALN (National Libera- tion Armed Forbes) was even undovered in the, petroleum center of AnZoatguil State. ' TRAINING r?k CLDMR/LLAS But if Castro and company' have their way, this is but a foretaste' of far Verse to "come. According to reliable 'reports reaching WaShington, guerrilla training?once con- fined ip Cubit itself--;-is gaiiag on in the Vene- zuelan *fates Of tare and Falcon, The guer- rilla chieftain Is a 'former "Venezuelan news- paper than, 'Fabrthi6" Ojeda. " The Venezuelan' National Liberation Front believes in, the formalities. It is officially represented in Cuba by German Layret, who recently went through the fornialitk of sign- ing , a "mutual aid pact" with the Vietcong representative in "Havana. Castro's press and radio made much of this and openly boasted that the pact her- alded," the, atart Of-Vietnani:type wars, not just in Venezuela but in other parts of Latin America. Clearly, the Communist guerrillas, like their counterparts in Asia, are planning carefully and diabolically for the years ahead. Weapons and central direction are coming from cube and will continue to do so?as lpng as" the fed: State's Permits this to goon. The question is whether the United States - can afford to look the other way while Cuba - provides the transmission belt for" weapons with which the Communists plan to subvert the bemispliere. In Vietnam; we waited 'until almost the 11th hour before' attempting seriously to interrupt outside sources of supply of men and material. Isn't there a lesson to be learned from that tragedy? Or are we to be paralyzed into inaction by failing to take seriously Castro's threats of turning Latin America into a series of Vietnam's? One Woman Comments EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. 'JAMES A. HALEY OF FLORIDA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, August 23, 1965 Mr. HALEY. Mr. Speaker, in this time of domestic turmoil and interna- tional crisis, it is refreshing to hear some one speak with a calm sane voice. For this reason I have asked permission to irclude in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, my friend, Mrs. George L. Burr's column, "One Woman Comments," which ap- peared in the August 19, 1965, issue of the Winter Haven, Fla., Herald. Josephine Burr, as she is known to her many friends and readers, gives sound advice that is worthy of the attention of readers of all ages?not just the young people entering college to whom these re- marks were addressed. If more people lived,Mrs. Purr's philosophy, this world would be a more stable and more whole- some place in which to live: ONE WOMAN COMMENTS (By Josephine G. Burr) Let us forget the trials of the National Council of Churches this week while I write a letter to my granddaughter. She is only 6 and starting to school, but I am going to pretend that she is 18 and starting to college because I hope some college-bound boy or girl will read this and possibly think a bit more carefully when he gets to the campus. DEAREST VICKIE: I know you are a bit fear- ful as you leave home this fall, for you are actually going out into the world alone for the first time. A college or university cam- pus is a world of its own and a place where you will meet all kinds of people. You will either thoroughly enjoy your life there, as I did, or be heartsick because you did not realize your great opportunity to learn what life is all about. Life of today is much more complicated than it was for me 50 years ago, however, so I think maybe I can help if you will heed. First you young folks are much more aware of what is going on in the world today than we were back in 1913. There are peculiar "isms" abroad in the land, wild-eyed terror- ists, and some who believe communism will save the world from destruction. But there ire also many good ideas, many fine thinkers. I hope you have absorbed from your prob- lems class in high school or the course you took in communism that Florida high schools require, the dangers that lurk in these pecu- liar subversive minds. I am sure you read of the troubles the Berkeley, Calif., campus had last fall. Many people thought it all the fault of Communist off-campus folk who created this trouble. I think they had their part in it, but let's face it, there is unrest on every college campus today created by this changing world in which we find ourselves. 'The "Wave of the Future" that Ann Morrow Lindbergh wrote about back in the 1040's has overtaken us. Every nation, however small, is trying for the highest kind of freedom and to equal the good things that we here in America have enjoyed for so long. They hate us for having found them first, and since this is the "land of the free and the home of the brave," they are trying to prove, in their strivings, that we are wrong and they are right. Revolution is in the air and the world is so rampant for freedom that we be- gin to wonder if we are as free as we have always taken for granted we were. Let us not waiver?ever?in our ideas of what free- dom really is and how to keep it. That is what you young folks of today must work to preserve. One thing I want to emphasize as you start your college career?please do your own thinking. You will doubt yourself at times and your ability to think right, but do not allow the thoughts of someone else to be- come yours unless you have spent hours try- ing to find out the truth about controversial subjects. You, Vickie, have been fortunate in growing up in a normal home. Many of the young people you will meet have warped minds because they were not so fortunate. Grief, money troubles, broken homes, liquor, can tear up lives and create so much unhap- piness, especially in young people's minds, that they become unstable in their think- ing and their emotions. Look into the back- ground of those who seem different and try to discover why they are different?then feel sorry, be tolerant, but do your own thinking. But we were discussing freedom. When I was in college no one questioned it. Since then we have helped France and England preserve their freedoms in World War I, then again in World War II when the madman, Hitler, tried to change things to his warped mind's way of thinking, we sent our young men to fight for freedom. Now the Russians, who realized they 'were being ruled by a mad king, cannot seem to be happy just changing their own world. They are being led by the Ideologies of three other mad men, Karl Marx of Germany, Lenin, and Stalin. But some- thing has happened in our own land of the free that is very frightening. We do not all seem to appreciate that our Founding Fathers planned well and there are too many Americans trying to change our world. Two characteristic stand out in all this strife of today?hate and fear. They are not new?they ruled the German Kaiser, they definitely ruled Hitler, and today they rule all the odd people who think change is the only road to freedom. The one thing to me that will make you realize we have been and still are on the right track in America, will be your absorbing the education that you are about to undertake. However, you must keep your feet on the ground; you must believe, as you have been taught, that there is a God above us all who strives to help us; and that if you live by the Golden Rule, you cannot get off the right course for long. Education also means tolerance to me, Vickie, for all people are not made alike?everyone has his good points and his bad ones. Just be sure you can tell the difference and are not led by bigotry or mass thinking, but by your own careful estimation of what is the best course. I am sure you will know and if you become confused, pick out a person you love and trust and talk it all out. One last admonition and to me it is very Important. I want you to have fun and enjoy your college life as well as its oppor- tunities, and the best way to do this is to join with a group of congenial folks in a Greek letter society. Today they are, the last sure bulwark of Americanism on the college campus. They exist for the sake of friend- ship; they are governed by men and women who have been careful in their thinking. Their first loyalty is to God and country and they provide a "home away from home" where you can find folks reared as you were reared, girls and boys who think about life as you do and have been forewarned by parents and fraternity elders about the dangers of today. You will find folks you can talk to and dis- cuss things with, but best of all, you will find real friends. Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 August 23, 1965 ApprovcamEggsmsghp300?rtigL9=1166R000500080005-4 A4701 dinlinishes men's respect for it strikes at the Very heart of orderly, democratic, and pro- sive living. This does not mean that all laws are either right or perfect. It does not Mean that laws should not change and evolve. But it does mean that the security, health, and progress of men and of nations lies in a respect for law and a willingness to obey it. In the last few days two prominent Ameri- cans have addressed themselves to this very question, but from sharply different view- points. ComMenting on the Los Angeles riots, former President Eisenhower said, "I believe the United States as a whole has been becoming atmosphered * * * in a policy of lawlessness. If we like a haw, we obey it; if we dont, we are told: 'You can disobey it.'" Also discussing the west coast rioting, New York -Senator ROBERT P. KENNEDY is quoted in an interview as saying that it was sense- less to tell Negroes living in northern slums to obey the law, that to these Negroes the law is the enemy. The Kennedy statement is deeply disturb- ing. "Even granting the fact that many Negroes do in fact regard the law as their enemy, Will the Kennedy statement do any- thing to change their view? Will it not, rather, give them the impression that in- natienal figures look with sympathy upon their breaking of the law? As a former Attorney General who had shown himself active in securirig wider Negro protection un- der law, Senator KENNEDY is in a particularly favorable position to remind the Negro that the law is, in fact, his greatest safeguard. It Is regrettable that this opportunity was missed. We agree without reservation with Presi- dent Eisenhower's statement: "I believe we Must 'have greater respect for law. This means 'to me we must review our * * moral standards." Great efforts are now being made nation- ally on behalf of the Negro. Greater efforts Will doubtless be made in the future. While it is true that many of these efforts are be- lated, It is also true that they are being made because the American people as a whole be- lieve in the reign of justice. And justice -without law is an impossibility. Only through support of law and Justice can any American citizen, Negro or white, hope to live in peace and prosperity. Law is man's present highest concept of that higbie, perfect order toward which human progress tends. It must be protected, hon- ored, fostered, and obeyed. To Our Soldiers in Vietnam EXTENSION OF REMARKS er HON. JOHN A. RACE WISCONSIN IN 111E HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, August 23, 1965 Mr. RACE. Mr. Speaker, the current issue of the Jewish Veteran carries a front page editorial entitled, "To Our Soldiers in Vietnam." This editorial, representing the official view of united Jewish war veterans, ana- lyzes the role of Red China, not only in the "narrow confines" of the Vietnam struggle, "but also in the light of all its worldwide implications." Mr. Speaker, under leave to extend my remarks I request that the editorial be printed at this point in the RECORD, and commend its careful reading to my col- leagues: To Ova SOLDIERS IN VIETNAM The veterans community of the United States wants you to know that we stand four-square in support of your sacrifice in the cause of freedom. As citizens who have borne arms for this Nation before you, we realize full well the importance to your morale and fighting spirit the assurance that the whole country is fully aware of the nature of your mission and the vital im- portance of it. At the heart of the American involvement In Vietnam is the confrontation of the grow- ing power and influence of the world's most dangerous and irresponsible nation?Red China. Debates are in progress about the Ameri- can strategies and tactics in Vietnam, the rights and wrongs of our involvement, and the issue of escalation. These are questions which should rightfully be examined and discussed in the Congress and by the public. But we must not lose sight of the basic motivation for the pending mobilization of Reserves and the expanded American com- mitment in southeast Asia. Red China leaves us no alternative but a firm stand on every periphery of that restive aggressive goliath. We do not intend to make a case for the Saigon leaders of South Vietnam as the most perfect and desirable exponents of freedom. We hope and pray that better leadership for our side can be found. In the long struggle, We cannot defeat communism except through the dynamic appeal of a better idea?the true ideology of freedom. But in the larger picture, we are con- fronted with such a massive peril that the deficiencies of the Saigon regime are some- what beside the main point. The basic issue at hand is the dedication of China, a nation whose population is three of or four times as large as our own, to defeat and obliterate us. To them we are the mortal foe. They have served notice that they intend to crush us and our way of life. Today, China has the atomic bomb. Crude though their weapon may be when compared with the supermegaton power in American hands, the fact remains that the least re- sponsible regime on earth has the power to Ignite a thermonuclear conflict. Millions of Chinese may be wiped out. But other na- tions could be involved in a holocaust which Russia mi? ht not be able to avoid despite its present differences with Chinese ex- tremism. -RED CHINA AND THE MIDDLE EAST Right now, China is seeking to gain her ends by exploiting so-called wars of national liberation. That is her role in the bloody, confused and unhappy affair in Vietnam. It also seems to be her objective elsewhere, even in the Near East where the Chinese are seek- ing among other goals, to foment Arab guer- rilla violence against Israel to create a tacti- cal diversion to Vietnamese conflict. Let us also examine the role of Red China toward Israel. Peiping blackballed Israel back in the days of the Bandung Confer- ence of Asian Nations, alleging that Israel was "an imperialist creature" and had no right to exist. Israel had previousry recog- nized Red China diplomatically because, whether one likes it or not, Red China exists. But Peiping did not reciprocate and rejected a diplomatic exchange because her only thought of Israel was as a scapegoat to use in appealing for Arab sympathies. Arab guerrilla attacks on Israel, if carried to lengths that would inflame the whole tense frontier problem, would spread, confuse, and Intensify the world crisis. It would help the -Vietcong by keeping American forces on the alert in the Mediterranean and Europe. The U.S. 6th Fleet, for instance, could not relin- quish its marine components for duty in the Far East, if trouble were brewing in the Near East. Such a move would also inflame the Arab masses to serve Chinese ends by intimidating Arab leaders into closer support of the Peiping line. China, instead of Russia would become the most militant activist and leading exponent of Arab fanaticism against Israel. Peiping feels that an Arab-Israel war could diminish mounting American pressure in Vietnam, extricate China from a military showdown for the present, and provide more time far development of atomic weapons and delivery systems. Such strife is consistent with Chinese attempts to foment "anti- imperialist" disorder throughout southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Offers have already been made by China to the extremist "liberation front" of Pales- tinian Arab refugees. Headed by Arab agi- tator Ahmed Shukairy, an Arab delegation was welcomed to Peiping and promised money, weapons, and military training if they would launch a "liberation war" against Israel. China envisaged internal sabotage by Israel's Arab population, creation of an armed underground movement, bombings, sabotage, and infiltration raids from outside. Mao Tse-tung told the Arabs that "an Al- gerian delegation told us once that Algeria lost a million lives in the guerrilla struggle for independence. I told them that peoples should not be frightened if their population decreases in the course of a liberation war, for they will enjoy a period of peace after- ward in which they can again multiply." Peiping considers it ridiculous that 45 mil- lion Arabs surrounding 2% million Israelis do not crush the Jews with action and blood Instead of mere words and promises as es- poused by Egypt's Nasser and others. Nasser and Shultairy are not quite ready for a "peoples' war" against Israel because they know that Israel has the power to hit back and that the United States might not stand idly by. Nasser fears that the Sinai zone might become another Danang, poised against Arab infiltration if the "masses" ever materialized on a Vietcong-type rampage. Mao subsequently condemned Arab lack of militance as "bourgeois humanitarianism." They are "too, preoccupied with survival," he charged. But he hopes eventually, inexora- bly, to enlist the Arabs in a Near Eastern escalation in keeping with the insidious and subversive Chinese strategies. Therefore, when we support our Govern- ment and its actions in Vietnam we do so not only within the narrow confines of that area but also in the light of all its worldwide Implications. Castro tEreat Not So Empty EXTENSION OF REMARKS or HON. J. ARTHUR YOUNGER OF claimer-La IN THE HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES Monday, August 23, /965 Mr. YOUNGER. Mr. Speaker, so far as the public is concerned, there seems to be no attention being paid to Castro and his regime in Cuba as constituting a threat to the Western Hemisphere. I was glad to note the following article written by Marguerite Higgins which ap- peared in the Washington Star: CASTRO THREAT NOT So EMPTY (By Marguerite Higgins) Until recently, Johnson administration offi- cials tended to shrug off Cuban Premier Fidel Castro's boasts of turning Latin American wars of liberation into Vietnam-type con- flicts. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-R0P67B00446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R0005000800054 September 2, 196' 'CONGRESSIONAL RECORD -- APPEN"DiX A4991 anihAnt Irits-callable capital 'and subject oitakirtzkrtog AND MANAGEMENT OF THE BANK delivered at the International Develop- to a Provision of prior agreement before The Board of Governors of the Bank ment Conference, Washington, D.C., the Bank can sell bonds in that particu- should probably meet annually, make May 26, 1965. lar country. . general policy, and delegate detailed Black, Eugene R.: Statement on _ Bank investments should be in projects policymaking and executive control to southeast Asia economic and social de- which are economically and technically the Board of Executive Directors and the velopment presented to the House of sound and , capable of producing fairly President who should be Asian. The Representatives Banking and Currency rapid repayment. A small portion of the best plan is felt to be that the Board Committee on July 29, 1965. Bank's paid-in capital should be set aside should be made up of 10 members, 7 from Black, Eugene R.: Statement to the -. for soft loan purposes. the regional countries. It is anticipated, meeting of the consultative committee . 14F4W)INR.,E1P's however, that a formula will be used in of experts on the Asian Development , The Asian countries are proposing that distributing Board positions which will Bank, Bangkok, Thailand, June 28, 1965. the bulk of the Bank's regular capital enable the United States, as a substan- "Inter-American Development Bank: should be loaned on hard terms similar tial shareholder, to hold as a permanent Basic Information," Inter-American De- to those of the International Bank for seat one of the three places on the Board velopment Bank, Washington, D.C., Oc- Reconstruction and Development. The set aside for nonregional participants. tober 31, 1964. IBR,D's terms are currently a unitary LOCATION Johnson, Lyndon Baines: Remarks of 51/z percent interest rate for all coun- In accord with the founding principle the President at Shriver Hall Auditorium, tries. Loans should be allowed maturi- of a bank for Asians run by Asians, the April 7, 1965, Johns Hopkins University, ties up ,to 30 years and grace periods Asian Development Bank will be located Baltimore, Md. varying normally up to 6 years, gen- within the region. The United States is Rostow, W. W.: "Economic Develop- erally in relation to the economic situ- not interested in playing an active role ment in Asia," the Department of State ation in the country and the country's in determining the choice of location of bulletin, volume 52, May 31, 1965, pub- debt servicing capacity and the type of the Bank. lication No. 7898. project. The consultative committee has RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE BANK AND OTHER United Nations Economic Commission proposed that soft loans from regular INSTITUTIONS for Asia and the Far East, report of the capital will be made only in special cir- It is felt that the Bank should certain- ministerial conference on Asian eco- cumstances on terms similar to those of ly collaborate closely with the national nomic cooperation, January 6, 1961. the International Development Associ- development banks or institutions where ation?IDA. The IDA's soft loan terms this may assist in effective channeling are CilirentIy three-fourths of 1 percent the Bank's resources in the interests of interest, 10-year grace, and a 50-year re- economic development. Adrian Daily Telegram Discusses payment. Applicants for soft loans with Medicare the lowest debt servicing prospects and PROBLEMS AND IMPLICATIONS limited aecess to subStantiaI quantities of Although the national press has pub- concessional assistance sources such as lished comparatively little on the subject IDA, AID, and certain consortium mem- of the Asian Development Bank since bers, ,will be given due account. Subject President Johnson's April 7 speech in to the view of the Members up to 10 per- Baltimore, it has focused attention on cent of the total paid-in capital could some of the implications of the Bank be devoted to this soft window. - proposal and potential problems. In addition' to these' Soft loan terms There has been much speculation since provided by ihe Bank charter thettnited April as to how the Congress would re- States it the ,Tune Meeting In Bangkok spond to the President's commitments to propos6d that a SoutheaSt Asian Regional the Bank. To counteract this criticism DeveloPmerif lErund be established with it has been suggested that a delegation the Bank bearing the responsibility for of Congressmen be brought into the ac- the selection Of the -projects and the ad- tive formation of the Bank to help quell ministration of these binds 'Which are opponents of the President's plan in Con- held in trust. These funds - clistribUted gress, by the Bank would include $100 mu- Other newspaper reports have conjec- lion contributed by the United States, tured that the U.S. offer to Russia to subject to congressional approval, and become a charter member of the Asian sufficient participation by other members Bank is a device to intensify the split to make the fund a truly multilateral between Russia and Red China. operation. Contributions to the Fund Finally, other observers point out that could be tied to U.S. procurement and the administration is dangling the Bank could be used for hard or soft loans or on a string before North Vietnam, by grants for projects of a regional or sub- implying that if hostilities should cease regional character, they too could participate in the institu- , ammaresmP ng 1,rt BANIt tion. Hanoi has responded indicating that she saw this lure aspect clearly by calling the Bank, "President Johnson's rotten carrot." Without arguing the merit or lack thereof of these and other implications and speculations, it is safe to say that the encouragement and support of such an institution is a dramatic step for our foreign policy in the Far East. It also marks a constructive and we believe pref- erable alternative to post-World War II American aid. The United States favors full member- ship in the Bank for nthiregional mem- bers of ICAD thty percent of the voting shares, in the view of the tJnited States, should be distributed propor- tionately to the size of capital contribu- tions, On this basis over 60 percent. of the voting rights would still be vested in regional members. The group of nine experts suggested that the votes in the Bank should be weighted in proportion to the size of the 00m-tiles subscription and that only the lower end of the 5 to 20 Percent range should have votes dis- tributed equally. This arrangement would give regional members over 60 -Percent of the total votes. Regional MeMbers _include 3Etizen Australia, and New Zealand. WORKING BIBLIOGRAPHY "Asia Aid Request: Official Transcript of President Johnson's News Conference at the White House," the Washington Post, Wednesday, June 2, 1965. Bell, David E.: "Regional Cooperation In South and Southeast Asia," a speech EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. WESTON E. VIVIAN OF MICHIGAN IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, September 2, 1965 Mr. VIVIAN. Mr. Speaker, for over 8,0 years, the Adrian Daily Telegram, a newspaper located in my district, has been informing the citizens of Lenawee County, Mich., on the local, national, and international events which daily af- fect their lives. A recent editorial in the Daily Tele- gram, entitled "How Much Security," discusses the history of the social se- curity program, particularly the role which social security income and the medicare program play in the lives of the elderly of our Nation. The editorial is brief but uncommonly sound. I com- mend it to the attention of my colleagues. It follows: [From the Adrian Daily Telegram, Aug. 23, 1965] HOW MUCH SECURITY? The social security measure adopted 30 years ago provided retirement income for 25 million workers. The ultimate goal was to provide retirement funds, as a matter of right, for all the Nation's aged. The 25 mil- lion figure seemed a good place to start, and at a reasonable scale. The program has been expanded greatly since those days of the 1930's. Some 76 mil- lion Americans now are covered including professional people, farmers and business- men. About 20 million already are receiving benefits, an average of $80 a month. The maximum now is $135.90 a month. Next year the average monthly payment goes to $149.90 a month. In 1971 the maxi- mum rises to $167.90 a month. Social secu- rity sweeteners have been enacted in each of the last 7 general election years, all of them calling for a greater expenditure of social Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R0005000800054 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A4992 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX September 2, 1965 security funds and oftentimes also calling for higher social security payments. Last month President Johnson signed the biggeSt sweetener of all, the medical care program for all persons over 65 years of age. It ended a two-decade struggle to obtain ap- proval of such legislation. Again, the social security cost, both to employee and employer Will be increased. The social security program has been a great boon to the American people. It has helped people prepare for old age vtho might not be able to meet the demands of this Period in life any other way. The medical care program, while it will be costly, will benefit many older people. A net egg is easily wiped away in the twilight years dur- ing one long seige of illness. Cost has a bearing on the operation of the social security system, of course. ,But the key to success or failure lies in deciding where security should end. Social security must not stifle ambition. It must not smother a willingness to work. It must not penalize aggressiveness. It must not under- mine determination. It must not discourage the desire for independence. It must not erect roadblocks to initiative. It should permit people to retire in dignity but it should not convert them into useless Vegetables. Thank heavens, we are safe, so far. Manolo eyes?First President of the Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. DANTE B. FASCELL OF FLORIDA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, September 2, 1965 Mr. FASCRIT. Mr. Speaker, Manolo Reyes, a prominent Cuban newsman now living in exile in Miami, Fla., was re- cently installed as the first president of the Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami. The programs outlined by Mr. Reyes in his installation speech reflects a deep love of the country and a profound and abiding faith in the. future Of his brave land now swept by terror, and tyranny. Mr. Speaker, I commend Mr. Reyes' remarks to the attention of my col- leagues: Few have been the occasions in which a group of citizens from the United States and Cuba have gathered together for an event like the one taking place tonight: the offi- cial Chartering of an association devoted to help and serve mankind, supported by Cuban exiles living in a land of liberty. Consequently, this event of extraordinary importance, shows undoubtedly the grati- tude of the people of a nation that, have been treated like real brothers by the people and the Government of the United States. A brave and nqble people that will not be bought, nor surrender, and are fighting to break the chains of communism, with the conviction that in their freedom they will bring also liberty for the entire American continent. , As president of the Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami, elected by the free and democratic vote of its members, I express to all and each one of the distinguished personalities of Latin America and to the Federal, State, and local authorities of the United States, the testimony of our deep gratitude for your presence in this act, whtch will encourage us to proceed on the long road ahead of us and which ratifies an old friendship, proving, now more than ever that we are not alone. Why was the Cuban Sertoma Club of Mi- ami organized? First of all, because of God's willingness; and second, because a group of Cuban and American citizens decided to create another way of helping humanity. This is a troubled world where although the word love is con- stantly repeated, we forget most of the time that only when serving mankind can we truly prove our love for our fellow beings. Interpreting the way of thinking of the members of the Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami, I want to express our gratitude to four American citizens without whose co- operation this institution would not have been possible. They are: A. L. Plager, Steve Collinson, Charles Nelson and John D. Bar- field. Who should be members of the Cuban Ser- toma Club of Miami? Those who love their country distinguish themselves from others because they serve the cause of liberty without stopping to thank about the cost of sacrifice, while the others try to obtain something of personal interest with the least sacrifice. The Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami will be composed of the first kind of people. We reject the others. A nation has two wrong types of citizens: Those who do not belive in their country, and those who express belief in their country but do not do anything for it. The Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami will accept those who want to work for the bene- fit of mankind, and for their own country, Cuba, which was not horn to be enslaved. For this reason, the Cuban Sertorna Club of Miami will be composed of exiles who have been forced to abandon Cuba because of communism, and who will pledge them- selves to work in favor of all Cubans, those within the martyred island as well as those in exile, hoping to receive as their only re- ward: the right to serve humanity and the cause of liberty. What are the plans of the Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami? For approximately 7 years, the Cuban peo- ple have suffered in their flesh Communist oppression. Children growing today in what was once called the Pearl of the Antilles, are not Cubans; under the pressure of a fright- ful indoctrination they are being converted Into youths without spiritual values; with- out Pan Americanism; and without true Cu- ban feelings. It is a Communist-inspired youth. When Castro-communism is defeated, it will be necessary to save this youth, who have not seen the light of truth, and we have to prepare the ways and means so that they can learn a new idea, of which they are ignorant, the concept of liberty. The future of nations depends on educa- tion. Liberty is obtained by breaking the chains of ignorance. ? Therefore, the Cuban Sertoma Club of Mi- ami, a civic, nonpolitical and nonprofit asso- ciation, having the basic.understanding that education is freedom, proposes to study as many concrete plans as possible to help de- communize the people of Cuba, and especially the Cuban youth of today which is under the perverse influence of 1VIarxist-Leninism. In the meantime, we intend to help in every way we can the children of our coun- try in exile, in order for them to learn the advantages pf growing and studying in this country?the cradle of democracy?but at the same time to help them to maintain our traditions; our customs; our history; our Cuban way of life, until the moment they will be able to return to our country, once it Is liberated from communism. Many of ,them will be the future leaders of the new Cuba and must be prepared for that event. Moreover, the Cuban Sertoma Club of Mi- a,rni will spare no work or effort to act as one more bridge of friendship, understand- Ing and help between the people and the authorities of the United States or Latin America and the Cuban community in exile. For all these purposes we invoke, now and forever, God's help, and the help of all the citizens of the free world, who, fortified by good faith and friendship, may wish to share the trials that we now suffer and our hap- piness once Cuba is freed from communism. The Cuban Sertoma Club of Miami is one more means created to help gain the peace in a Cuba liberated from communism and to this effect we respectfully request from this moment on as many valid promises as pos- sible to help the creation of a new Cuba, the pride of all Cubans and of a continent which is being redeemed from communism by a nation nailed to a cross of suffering in the middle of the Caribbean. But, Cuba will never die. Yesterday it suffered the aliment of dictatorship. Today it suffers the epidemic of communism. But rising above the transitory illness that affect its health Cuba lives and will live forever. And now, let's all get to work. State Technical Services Act of 1965 SPEECH OF HON. CHARLES McC. MATHIAS, JR. ' OF MARYLAND IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, September 1, 1965 The House in Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union had under consideration the bill (HR. 3420) to pro- mote economic growth by supporting State and regional centers to place the findings of science usefully in the hands of American enterprise. Mr. MATHIAS. Mr. Chairman, this bill would initiate the first comprehen- sive effort to make the tremendous ben- efits of national research activities avail- able to American business, commerce, and industry throughout the country. This would be an effort beneficial to many localities, to American enterprise and to the whole American economy. This is in the best sense a cooperative, grassroots program. It encourages States to mobilize their industries and institutions to make full technico-eco- nomic surveys and to formulate long- range economic plans. Many agencies in my own State of Maryland are already -engaged in such planning, and this leg, islation would further those efforts and help other States to begin similar proj- ects. The planning aspects of this bill could also have many "spin-off" effects in promoting increased cooperation among industries and institutions on in- numerable local tasks. The programs developed on the basis of such preliminary planning will be pin- pointed to meet the problems of free en- terprise within each State. The types of technical assistance which can be utilized are limited only by the percep- tion and imagination of the committees involved. Through technical advice, through seminars and discussions, through the dissemination of informa- tion, local industries will be lifted i:nto enhanced competitive positions as they begin to take full advantage of the tech- nological advances of recent years. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 21936 CONGRESSIONAL, RECORD,? SENATE September 2, 1965 There is every reason for believing, however, that, to the extent that the Castro Communists and Peiping Com- munists have inflUence in the American Negro community, their followers are en- couraged to foment unrest; to take part In Negro riots and uprisings, to seek to provide them with leadership and direc- tion, and to seek to extend the area of hostilities. 'So, while the broadcasts of Radio Dixie may not reach as far as Chicago and Los Angeles, it would be a fair conclusion that the contents of these broadcasts concide with the, guidelines laid down by the Castro agents in this country for their followers in the American Negro community. There may not be many American Negroes who follow the Castro- Peiping line. I doubt that there are as many as 1,000, and I think the number would be nearer several hundred. But in an inflammatory situation a handful of trained agitators, committed to vio- lence and arson, can do an awful lot of , damage. It is a matter a record that Com- munist cadres undergo systematic train- ing in the techniques of organizing riots and breaking through police lines. There is even a Coin.munist handbook on the subject which has been distributed , in many languages. It is a matte); of record, too, that, quite apart from providing leadership in riot situations, a handful of Communists in key positions can suffice to Lake over an entire country--as they did in Cuba, as they did in the 13razzaville, Congo, as they did in Zanzibar? and as they recently almost succeeded in doing in the Domini- can Republic. So let no one minimize the capacity for mischief of a handful of Commu- nists, And let no one minimize the dan- ger inherent in the fact that, in every major metropolitan center in the United States, there exists- at least a handful of Communist extrents committed to the Castro-Peiping line. Patterns of Communist activity are difficult to pin down, especially in riot situations. But I do read some signifi- cance into the fact,that apparently some of the rioters. made their #rst targets the gunshops and pawnshops in the Watts area and that not only did they succeed In escaping with many hundreds of? weapons, but they systematically set the torch to all gunshops they had looted so that even the owners could not know how many guns were stolen anq. how many destroyed. The rioters also made prime targets of drugstores for the pur- pose of obtaining narcotics, and of liquor stores, There is, therefore, some serious rea- son for believing that Castro had a hand, or at least a finger, in the Los Angeles riots, and that we nia,, j anticipate more trouble from this aource over the coin- ing period. I don't mean to imply that if there ,were no Castrp-dommunist influence in the American Negro community, there would have been no Los Angeles riots.' 'This w9U1c1 be, p, gross oversimplification. ;n._ order to ..effectively_egminate the danger of racial explosions like os An- geles, we wifl have to eliminate the so: cial conditions that breed frustration and anger and hatred among our Negro citizens. ? We will have to eliminate the Negro ghettos.? . We will have to conquer the serious res- idue of discrimination that still exists In our society. We will have to achieve the goal that the administration has set for our Na- tion?the goal of a society free from every form of religious and racial dis- crimination, where every citizen not only enjoys complete political equality, but complete social equality and equality of opportunity as well. But let us have no illusions. These goals are not going to be achieved over- night, even with the best of intentions and the most energetic programs. During the period of readjustment to the American society of the future, it is my hope that our Negro the, will continue to follow the lead of the respon- sible leaders of the civil, rights move- ment, who have repeatedly warned them against the dangers of violence. It is my hope that, with the help of these leaders, they will be able to dis- cipline their more unruly members, and expose, and isolate the agents of Castro and Mao Tse-tung, who urge the Amer- ican Negroes to emulate Los Angeles and -pursue the fatal path of violence. FEEDING THE HUNGRY WITH U.S. FARM SURPLUSES Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, ever since he served as Director of the food- for-peace program, my distinguished col- league, GEORGE McGovmax, has been America's leader in urging us to under- take a more comprehensive, worldwide "war against want." He has seen, as clearly as any man alive, the appalling contradiction between a world where millions starve and a United States where we seek to cut down our food pro- duction. He has introduced ambitious new legislation designed to make possible a much larger, more effective American program to use our agricultural bounty to feed the hungry of the world. In the Newark Sunday News of August 29, there appeared a United Press article which highlights the problem of world hunger and Senator MCGOVERN'S role in opening America's eyes to it. Mr. President, I ask unanimous con- sent that this article, "Senator Would Feed Hungry With U.S. Farm Surpluses," be printed at this point in the RECORD. There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: SENATOR WOULD FEED HUNGRY WITH U.S. FARM SURPLUSES WASHINGTON.?For years, a bountiful America has struggled?and spent millions? to control its farm surpluses. Now a farm State Senator wants an about- face which would let farmers grow more food on more land and would distribute more of it to the world's hungry millions. Led by Senator GEORGE S. MCGOVERN, Democrat, of South Dakota, a group of Mid- western Democrats in Congress contend it Is neither sensible nor moral for the United States to follow a program of sharply cur- tailed food production when everyday half a billion people go to bed hungry. And they warn that strict Federal controls have reduced the Nation's food stockpiles to such a low point, that there are not enough of some of basic commodities to maintain a 6-month reserve for'home consumption. ADMIT PROBLEMS They admit that the problems in their plan could be many and complicated, But they argue that the results would be good for American farmers as well as for interna- tional relations. They believe President Johnson agrees. The roots of the food-for-peace (FFP) program lie in a 1954 law which provides for the distribution of surplus U.S. crops to have-not nations. The food may be given, bartered, sold for the currency of the receiv- ing nation, or bought through a 40-year American loan plan. In 1961 the program was designated food for peace, with MCGOVERN as its first direc- tor. But he found his office carried little authority. He resigned in 1962 to run for the Senate. But his 18-month exposure to FFP left its mark. On one side of the world he had seen mass graves of those who had starved to death; children whose gaunt limbs and distended stomachs testified to their hunger, and some blind from lack of proper nourishment. At home were millions of acres taken out of production in a continuing battle against too much food, even while farmers declared that their private economic depression could eventually engulf the cities. BILL LACKING President Johnson suggested in his farm message to Congress establishment of strat- egic reserves of food but he submitted no bill to accomplish this. Representative CLAIR A. CALLAN, Democrat, of Nebraska, did so June 3 with a measure which called for reserves of food equal to half a year's requirements. Under his proposal, for example, 600 mil- lion bushels of wheat would be kept on hand. That would leave only 41 millions for dis- tribution abroad. Two weeks later MCGOVERN submitted to the Senate an International Food and Nutri- tion Act of 1965. It would authorize an ad- ditional $500 million of foods of all kinds, not merely those now surplus, for distribu- tion to hungry nations. The program would be increased at the rate of $500 million a year until it reached $3.5 billion in 10 years. FULBRIGHT BILL His bill went to the Foreign Relations Committee whose chairman, Senator J. W. FULBRIGHT, Democrat, of Arkansas, has indi- cated he believes FFP should be stepped up from the mere dumping of surplus foods to providing the vitamins and proteins which hungry children require. Support for his plan was forthcoming. Vice President HUBERT H. HUMPHREY prom- ised whatever help he could give. Senator WALTER P. MONDALE, Democrat, of Minnesota, claimed that MCGOVERN'S plan would work for this country's own interests. "For every 10 percent the less developed countries increase their income level, they expand their dollar purchases of our farm products by 16 percent," he said. "Italy, Japan, and Nationalist China have moved from the status of food aid recipients to major dollar customers for our farm ex- ports." But some Members of Congress doubt that MCGOVERN'S proposal would do the job. NO FORMULA Senator KARL E. MUNDT, Republican, of South Dakota, said attempts have been made in the past to feed the world's hungry but that no workable formula ever was devised. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 September 2, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ?SENATE 21935 forestry education which investigates the institutions offering professional training in forestry. The committee evaluates the stat- us ot each institution's forestry program, the size, duties, and qualifications of the faculty, the library and laboratory facilities, and other factors. Institutions that meet the society's high standards for professional -training are placed on an accredited list. At the present time the list of accredited forestry schools in the United States are: Auburn University, Department of For- estry, Auburn, Ala. University of California, School of For- estry, Berkeley, Calif. Clemson University, Department of For- estry, Clemson, S.C. Colorado State University, College of For- estry and Range Management, Fort Collins, Colo. Duke University, School of Forestry, Dur- ham, NO. (graduate) . University of Florida, School of Forestry, Gainesville, Fla. University of Georgia, School of Forestry, Athens, Ga. University of Idaho, College of Forestry, Moscow, Idaho. University of Illinois, Department of For- estry, Urbana, Ill. Iowa State University, Department of For- est, Ames, Iowa. Louisiana State University, School of For- estry and Wildlife Management, Baton Rouge, La. University of Maine, School of Forestry, Orono, Maine. University of Massachusetts, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Am- herst, Mass. Michigan State University, Department of Forestry, East Lansing, Mich. The University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources, Ann Arbor, Mich. University of Minnesota, School of Forestry, St. Paul, Minn. University of Missouri, School of Forestry, Columbia, Mo. Montana State University, School of For- estry, Missoula, Mont. University of New Hampshire, Department of Forestry, Durham, NH. North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina, School of Forestry, Raleigh, N.C. Oregon State University, School of For- estry, Corvallis, Oreg. HOUSTON POST COMMENDS SENA- TOR KENNEDY FOR PLACING FOR- EIGN AID IN PERSPECTIVE Mr. YARBOROUGH. Mr. President, out of the sound and fury of political propagandizing, it is often difficult for one to maintain the proper perspective. However, once in a while a speech or edi- torial cuts through the fog like a sharp ray of sunlight. Such a service was rendered to the Senate a few months ago by the distin- guished junior Senator from New York [Mr. KENNEoyl during debate on the foreign aid bill. He pointed out that whereas in 1950 the United States was spending 10 percent of the Federal budg- et and almost 2 percent of our gross national product on foreign aid, today, although we are still spending approxi- mately the same $3 billion a year, we are allocating only 3 percent of the Federal budget or one-half of 1 percent of our gross national product to foreign aid. As Mr. KENNEDY pointed out, in 1965 we are putting only approximately one-third the effort into foreign aid that we did 15 years ago. ? As the Houston Post noted in an excel- lent editorial, this observation really puts our present foreign aid program into perspective. I commend the Senator from New York on his excellent speech, and the Houston Post on picking up that speech and making it the heart of an excellent editorial. Mr. President, I ask unanimous con- sent to have the editorial "Foreign Aid Put in Perspective" published in the Houston Post of June 20, 1965, printed In the RECORD. There being no objection, the editorial was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: [From the Houston Post, June 20,1965] FOREIGN AID PUT IN PERSPECTIVE One of the favorite tactics of critics of the U.S. foreign aid program is to toss figures around without relating them to anything meaningful. To most people, a billion dollars is a hor- rendous figure beyond the capacity of their imaginations, and they cannot relate it to anything concrete in their experience. Tak- ing advantage of this, foreign aid critics like to cite the huge sum that the program has cost this country since it was started following World War II. While picturing it as charity, they try to create the impression that it is a tremendous burden that the American people cannot afford. For that reason Senator ROBERT F. KENNEDY of New York made a point during Senate debate on the pending foreign aid measure that deserves more attention than it is likely to receive. He pointed out that 15 years ago, in 1950, the United States was contributing a sum equal to 10 percent of the Federal budget and almost 2 percent of the Nation's gross national product to economic development in the rest of the world. Today, this spending amounts to only 3 percent of the Federal budget and one-half of 1 percent of the gross national product. In other words, the U.S. Government to- day is making less than one-third the effort it was making in this area 15 years ago. Because of change in the situations of many countries that have received help in the past and an increased ability on their part to stand on their own feet, it has been possible to curtail annual aid expenditures. This alone is eloquent testimony to the ef- fectiveness of the program. The approximately $3 billion a year that still is being spent on foreign aid may seem like a very large sum when it is used as an isolated figure, and it is large, of course. A billion of anything is quite a lot nu- merically. But the cost of the program has to be related to other relevant figures to be meaningful, and when it is, the foreign aid expenditure seems very much smaller. Senator KENNEDY and some others are ask- ing whether or not, in light of the great needs of the people of the world and this country's vastly increased responsibilities, we are spending as much on foreign aid today as we should. Senator JOSEPH CLARK of Pennsylvania said in the Senate discussion that the United States should be thinking about a $10 billion program of economic aid, in addi- tion to military aid, instead of concentrating on how to reduce present appropriations. Those who are opposed to any foreign aid will dismiss all this as a liberal point of view and therefore not worthy of considera- tion. But, assuming that the program is managed intelligently and efficiently and conducted in such a way that it truly serves the national interest, the question raised is one that Americans of conscience should not ignore. In any event, Senator KENNEDY did some- thing that badly needed to be done. He helped place the present allocation for foreign aid in proper perspective. CASTRO CITES AMERICAN NE- GROES TO VIOLENCE Mr. DODD. Mr. President, I know that all of us were horrified by the un- speakable savagery and the senseless de- struction that characterized the recent riots in Los Angeles. And I for one wholeheartedly endorse the warning issued by President Lyndon B. Johnson that such violence cannot advance the cause of civil rights, but will, on the con- trary, only retard it. I do not mean to minimize the suffer- ing or injustices or frustration which helped to make Los Angeles and Chicago riots possible. However, I want to point out that such violence runs counter to the entire tradition of the American Negro and counter to the teachings of the legitimate civil rights movement. A new element has been added to the situation in American Negro communi- ties which makes them more riot-prone. This new element is the existence of or- ganized extremist groups, preaching hatred, and committed to acts of vio- lence. In addition to the Black Muslims, there are some hundreds of Negroes who are members of the Communist Party, or of the pro-Peiping Progressive Party, and there are other groups like the Dea- cons scattered around the country. The broadcasts of the renegade Ameri- can Negro Robert F. Williams, over Cas- tro's Radio Dixie, constitute an open, crude, and brutal incitation to violence. They are now encouraging all American Negroes to follow the example of Los Angeles and to carry it further. To give you an idea of the inflamma- tory nature of these broadcasts, I want to quote a few paragraphs from Robert F. Williams' broadcast of August 21 over Radio Dixie: Yes; Los Angeles, Los Angeles. The glori- our spirit of our brutally dehumanized people of the ghetto has restored our self- respect, our human dignity. Los Angeles is a warning to oppressive racists who said, they can no longer enjoy immunity from retribution for their brutal crimes of violence and oppression of our people. My brothers and sisters, times are critical, They are going to become ever more critical. We are facing a future wherein the streets shall become like rivers of blood. Let us be prepared to fight to the death, organize, arm, learn to shoot and to handle explosives. When the impending showdown comes, use the match and the torch unsparingly. The flame of retribution must not be limited to urban buildings and centers, but the country- side must go up in smoke also. Remember the forests, the fields, and the crops. Re- member the pipelines and oil storage tanks. Yes, let it be known to the world that we shall meet their sophisticated weapons of violence with the crude and simple flame of a match. We cannot escape our historical mission of destiny any more than our op- pressors can escape the destiny of retribution. I am informed that Radio Dixie broad- casts over only a limited area of the country?as far west as Texas and as far north as Virginia. It would be an exag- geration, therefore, to state that these broadcasts were directly responsible for the Los Angeles riots. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 25X1 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Next 1 Page(s) In Document Exempt Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 _Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Jul 1965 July 1 CONWIESSIONAL RECORD.-APPENDIX emergency teaching certificate by the State Which "wili 8,11OW them to take full-time posi- tions immediately. They will take required education subjects arid courses in Spanish literature over a 2-year period. According to pr. James E? Williams, direc- tor of the master of arts in teaching program and the special institute for the refugees, approximately 10 of the Cubans have already had interviews arranged for them with school superintendents in Bergen and Hudson Counties, Tile others will also be inter- viewed for teaching positions this summer. In addition to the master QS arts in teach- ing program work, the refugees will receive special instruction in the history of Ameri- can Public schools, English a,s a foreign lan- guage (all 26 speak English to varying de- grees of com.petency), and comparative clIlture and literature of Cuba and the United States. -22vE IN TzeusmcK The refugees will live in dOrmitories on the Teaneck campus until September. After they obtain full-time teaching jobs, their families will join them. Dr. Cancio-,Bella, who said he is apersonal friend of Batista's, was? at various times dur- ing a 7-year period, Ambassador to Panama, Costa Rica, Peru, Uruguay, and Chile. He is as fluent in Franck:1,p Spanish, having studied at the University of Lyon in France. He may end up teaching French and Spanish in some North Jersey high school. All the refugees were picked by Dr. Wil- liams and his staff during interviews in Miami this spring. Approximately 150 per- Slims were considered, Raul E. Mencliguita was a civii judge in Sancti-Spiritus, Cuba, for 26 years before leaving for exile in the United States. When he was interviewed in Miami, Mendignita was working in a tomato-packing plant. Another former, government official among the group is Andres Suarez. He was in the Ministry of Education during Batista's tenure and joined the Castro regime as assistant secretary in the Ministry of the Treasury from January 1, 1959 to October 1960. He be- came disillusioned with Castro and fled to Miami by plane in the fall of 1960. He said he has been doing some freelance writing in Miami. Mrs. Olga C. Fuentes, who assisted a pro- fessor of physiology and genetics in the Vniversity of Havana, has good reason to remember the disastrous 33,ay of Pigs inva- sion in 1961. Her husband was among those Who landed on the beach. He was captured, the said, and later exchanged. He works now in Miami and will join her when she becomes a teacher in September. -These four refugees are not optimistic about returning to Cuba, and they doubt they would go back now if they could. The main reason for their reluctance is the younger generation. They all have children and the children are thoroughly American- ized. Suarez said he was interested in obtain- ing American citizenship. He said he thinks his children would find Cuba a strange country if they returned. 43r. Cancio-Bello has one on studying to be a doctor at the University of Miami and another son preparing for a career in chem- ical engineering. He also has a 13-year-old daughter. Because his daughter talks only English now, Dr. Cando-Bello said, he de- cided to give her lessons in Spanish gram- mar. He taught her Spanish 1 hour a day for 6 months, "I'm 64 years old now," Dr. Cando-Bello said. "I don't think I could begin again in Cpa." Tie aim) believes Castro is going to 'be arolind awhile. When Castro does topple from power ,?there will be violent times in Cuba, Dr. Cancio-Bello predicted. Tor the first 10 clays of the institute, the refugees will meet periodically during the day with five recent American, college grad- uates, some of who are also enrolled in the master of arts in teaching program. Their job is to help orient the group to new surrounding and to correct the refugees' English. Also, the refugees will be taking some field trips. Tomorrow they will tour Englewood Junior High School; later in the week they visit the Madison campus of FDU. Foreign Aid: Partnership of Industrialized Nations EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF - HON. ALEC G. OLSON OF MINNESOTA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, July 1, 1965 Mr. OLSON of Minnesota. Mr. Speak- er, an article in the March issue of the Reader's Digest praises foreign aid ef- forts to help the "have not" countries and points out that foreign aid is no longer a U.S. monopoly but a partnership of industrialized nations which realize that the peoples of the world must be responsible for each other if the free world is to survive. Two-thirds of the world's population live in the less-developed countries? many of which are newly independent nations that must span centuries of pol- itical, social, and industrial development in a few short years. Some of us may have the impression that only the United States is meeting this challenge through foreign assistance. But this no longer so. Although at one time the United States was the only country giving major aid, today we are one of many nations who feel they have an immense stake in the process of development in these coun- tries. Seventeen other free world na- tions now contribute substantial foreign assistance to the developing nations. Total free world aid amounted to $8.1 billion in 1963, the last year for which figures are available. As David E. Bell, Administrator of the Agency for International Development, pointed out before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee recently: U.S. bilateral assistance, including Public Law 480 arid other economic aid, totals about .64 percent of our gross national product. The bilateral aid programs of other donors total slightly less?.60 percent of combined gross national product. But U.S. gross na- tional product per capita is almost 3 times that of other donor countries. From this point of view, the relative burden on the citi- zens of other donor nations is higher. The United States has been a major force behind the increased foreign as- sistance efforts of other donor countries and we have been pleased with their response. Bilateral aid commitments of the developed countries increased by 50 percent from 1960 to 1963 and for the -first time U.S. bilateral aid, including Public Law 480, was less than half the aid to the developing countries. The U.S. share of multilateral resources now ranges from 30 percent of World Bank subscriptions to 43 percent of the ordi- nary capital of the IDB, while other na- tions' contributions range from 44 per- Mit Of World Bank subscriptions to 100 A3489- percent of the European Economic Com- munity aid programs. There is every evidence that other donor countries will continue to increase their share. Canada has begun a new $50 million loan program in addition to their existing aid programs. The Neth- erlands recently announced a 20 percent increase in aid. Loan terms are begin- ning to ease in order to hasten develop- ment without imposing prohibitive debt burdens on recipient nations. The Brit- ish have decreased their average interest rates and West Germany has liberalized its loan maturities. The new Canadian program will include significantly more liberal terms than those provided by the United States. There is no doubt of the commitment of other nations to helping to better the lot of the masses of people in the world who live in poverty and ignorance. The magnitude of this human condition, the Increasing political responsibilities placed upon the developing nations in inter- national affairs, and the multiplying threat of communism to the independ- ence of their governments makes it man- datory that the United States and other advanced countries continue to restate their commitment. In this context, I would like to call attention to the Reader's Digest article which gives an excellent account of what other countries are accomplishing by their commendable foreign assistance programs: HANDS ACROSS MANY SEAS (By James Daniel) (Noiz.?Foreign aid to have-not nations is no longer a U.S. monopoly. A progress report on nation-to-nation help.) In Guinea, a 600-mile-long aqueduct is be- ing built to bring pure mountain water to the crowded capital city of Conakry. In Thai- land, a dam under construction will provide 25,000 kilowatts of electricity for homes and industries, besides irrigating thousands of acres of badly needed farmland. In Pakistan, buses are rolling through ancient streets where for centuries-the pace has been set by bullock carts. In Tanganyika, a recently completed railroad line is opening up the fer- tile Kilombera Valley to new sugar planta- tions. All these represent foreign aid at work? but not U.S. foreign aid. This may surprise many Americans who have come to think that the United States is alone in giving economic assistance to other countries The fact is that many nations are helping other countries. More than $6 billion a year is now distributed in government grants and loans from industrialized nations of the free world to less developed countries. Of this, 38 per- cent is contributed by countries other than the United States. On a proportional basis, several countries have equaled or surpassed the United States in economic assistance. France, for example, in 1963 extended $1.074 billion in total for- eign aid (i.e., official governmental aid plus private investment). This effort was one- forth as large as the U.S. performance, though France's production is only one- eighth as great. In the same year Portugal, a far poorer country than Prance, devoted a record 1.89 percent of her gross national product to official aid alone. Even Belgium was ahead of the United States, proportion- ally. None of this implies that we ought to enter a foreign-aid competition; nor does it mini- mize the burden the United States has car- ried and still carries. On the loan side of Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 3490 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECOEP ? APPENIMX July 1, 1965 reign aid, the 'United States is still the 1 rgest source of easy credit, annually lend- g more than $1 bition, much of it at ken interest rates of less than 1 percent. (5 ther countries have usually priced their 1 ans at 3 to 6 percent, or even 'higher.) F rthermore, the United States devotes 9.4 p rcent of its gross na,-;ional product to the ilitary defense of the free world, as com- p red to 4,7 percent fo:: its allies. Many of America's allies, however, have t air full share of dramatic projects. Can- a, for example, has built and helped fi- ance the $36 million Warsak hydroelectric d irrigation development on Pakistan's abul River, near the historic Khyber Pass. t present, Canadians have 76 major proj- e ts underway around the world. French railroad engineers undertook the odemization of India's electrical railways. &sides designing the new system, training e Indian supervisors, Mechanics, and con- uctors, France built one-third of the loco- otives and some of the other equipment. rack management teams borrowed from the rench railway system saiv the initial proj- t through to completion in 3 years?half e estimated time for a comparable project Europe. And the work still continues. Just a decade ago, West Germany was on e receiving end of economic assistance; ow she is giving it, to more than 90 nations. few examples of German aid: an improved lephone system for South Korea, construe- on of three irrigatior. dams in Tunisia, ex- - ansion of port facilities in Ceylon. One of the causes 'behind the upsurge in ee-world aid is the economic boom in West- rn European and North American countries nd (J'apan. These nations have discovered hat foreign-aid missions often stimulate ore sophisticated wants in emerging na- ions, requiring greater imports from the ndustrialized countries. Also, with aid pro- rams former colonial powers maintain their resence in ex-colonier. Another cause': late in the 1950's Washing- on candidly told European allies that the ime had come for them to spread some of heir Marshall plan-stimulated prosperity round among the poorer nations of Asia, rice, and South America. Besides genuine oncern over the pont :cal and social dangers nherent in the widening gap between haves nd have-nots, Washington was worried over he nagging imbalance in this country's in- ernational payments. To put steel in the U.S. request, Wash- ngton required that official economic-aid ollars henceforth be "tied", to purchases n the United States. This curtailed the use, y aid-receiving countries, of U.S. gift money o purchase commercial products from other ndustrialized countries. The latter, then, are compelled to increase their own aid ubstantially to keep 'alp their trade. One healthy upsho; of the U.S. cajoling urred in 1961, when Belgium, Britain, anada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the etheriands, Portugal, and the United States ortned the Development Assistance Commit- ee within the framework of the Organize- ion for Economic Cooperation and Develop- ent. Norway joined in 1962, Denmark in 963.: DAC's goals, besides persuading rich ountries to export more capital to poor ones, nclucle urging members to avoid wasting aid n unproductive proj acts, encouraging pri- ate investment, and making sure that un- erdeveloped countries are not loaded with ore debt than they can carry: DA.C's approach to foreign aid is low eyed and levelheaded. DAC officials say that aid is useless unless a receiving country as trained people, a stable government, and social system conchicive to working hard and getting ahead. In particular DAC bhors prestige projehts designed to flatter local rulers, such as .steel mills without ore hastoraers, or cold-war ploys based on the idea that if the free world doesn't give country X's dictator a dam the Colrimdflists will. The overS11 philosophy is sammed up in two state= nts. One was by Thorkil Kris- tensen, economist and former Finance Min- ister of benmark, who serves as OECD's Sec- retary General. "Many of the mistakes in foreign aid,' he told me, "have come from trying no de the photographable things first without the necessary advance preparation." The other statement was from Willard Thorp, prolessor of economics at Amherst College, sersing as chairman of DAC. After noting that certain emerging countries' rulers wut ;he attainment or enjoyment of office or the pursuit of more territory ahead of economic betterment, Thorp said, "At the outset, for many of these countries, the most ufefu, thing you could do was to in- crease theii total number of college gradu- ates film 5-to 10." In lipe With the emphasis upon people ahead ef p ans and money, some of Ameri- ca's allies are quietly pushing educational programs. For example, in addition to 1,000 scholarship students from former French colonieS attending French 'universities, each year 3400 f tagiaires, or on-the-job trainees, are brohght to study and work in France, in sceres ,of occupations ranging from radio broadcastir g to lighthouse maintenance. An importrnt objective is to inculcate new methods. work habits, and attitudes, which the trainees, on returning home, can pass along as a way of leavening the apathy of their propl.t. One of these stagiaires is Gerard Jerome Nana, a 22-year-old Camerounian, whom I intervitwec at the Renault auto works near Paris. :With five other articulate young Af- ricans, ;Gerard was putting ,in a 9-hour day of wor* and study at the plant, taking extra Saturday (sources, and often devoting his holidays to working as a mechanic in ga- rages around Paris for extra cash. Daily contact with a mOdern industrial society had given ::lerard an apostle's zeal. "Take just the matter of getting to work on time," he told me. "In my country if the French boss says, 'Everybody be on time to- morroW so we can get the job done,' the em- ployece say, `See, our ex-colonial masters are still trVing to exploit us.' If they only Un- derstoqd that one man's being late can cut the output of an entire factory, what a differ- ence is could make." Sine tho United States began pushing for more ou ders to the wheel, 16 other coun- tries nave instituted or strengthened aid progratns. As a rough guide, the United Na- tions t(ugeests that every "have" country should, devote at least 1 percent of its gross nationhl product to economic development in the ,"hrr(e not" countries, in whatever mix of public r nd private investment it chooses. Some Of the latest percentages of government aid anion(' DAC members: Portugal, 1.89; France, 1f17; Belgium, 0.76; United States, 0.72.' It is clear that equality of effort among the induszialized countries is still a far- off goal. William S. Gaud, Deputy Adminis- trator of the U.S. Agency for International Develcipment, said in teatimony before the House ,Foroign Affairs Committee: "The mere fact that other industrialized countries are contrihuti ag more aid each year does not answet the question of whether they are doing enough." In um the United States, having ex- pende4i more than $100 billion on foreign aid si ce' World War II, 'would like to see even inor) participation by its allies. It would:like them to share the philosophy typi- fied by A.bert Bougeant?e, participant in Volunteerr for Progress, the French peace corps?who is donating 2 years of his life to a prhiaithe village in steaming equatorial Africa; "::u this world," Bougeant says, "I believO thnt we are all a little bit responsible for on another." Burundi's Independence Day EXTENSION OF REMARKS Os, HON. ADAM C. POWELL OF NEW YORK IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, July 1, 1965 Mr. POWELL. Mr. Speaker, today marks the third anniversary of the in- dependence of the Kingdom of Burundi. We wish, therefote, to take this oppor- tunity to extend warm felicitations to His Majesty Mwami Mwarnbutsa IV; and the Burundi Ambassador to the United States, Leon Ndenzako. The Kingdom of Burundi is a small country in central Africa which has re- cently received attention from the American press. In view of the impor- tance of contemporary events, we should give attention here to the history and political background of this recently independent state. Burundi was among the last African states to come under European influence. Its first visitor from Europe was John Banning Speke, who in 1858 traveled through Burundi in his search for the headwaters of the Nile. In 1871, Stan- ley and Livingstone arrived there and explored the region near the present port-capital of Usumbura, on Lake Tanganyika. In E 1885, the German sphere of influence in Africa was ex- tended to include the territory of Burundi. Although the Germans re- mained there until 1916, the government remained in the hands of the traditional authorities. During the First World War, Burundi was occupied by Belgian troops; after the war, the territory was awarded to the latter as a mandate of the League of Nations. This status remained un- changed until after World War II, when Burundi, with its neighbor to the north, Rwanda, was made part of a United Na- tions trust territory under Belgian ad- ministration. Throughout the period of Belgian control, the traditional authori- ties also retained their positions. Dur- ing the latter years, however, the Bel- gians sponsored an extensive economic development program. By 1961, the people of Burundi had demonstrated their political maturity and responsibility by holding peaceful national elections. Plans for independence were com- pleted; with neither a political revolution nor a social upheaval, Burundi became a self-governing Si,ate, ruled as of old by the King, or Mwami, and his advisers. The Government, however, was now pat- terned on Western constitutional democ- racies rather than on old tribal organi- zations. On the 1st of July, 1962, the territory of Urundi became the independ- ent kingdom of Burundi. Today Burundi, under the leadership of its King, Mwambutsa IV, finds itself in a difficult political and economic situ- ation. Improvements in medicine and sanitation have created a serious threat of overpopulation in the small country; this situation has been made more serious by the considerable influx of refugees from neighboring countries. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 June 9, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE part of the State mental health plan which it submits to the. Public Realtla Service an- nually under title III of the Public Ileaath Service Act. , Section 4(c) provides that the Secretary may approve any State plan Which conforms substantially with section 4(a), and may not disapprove any plan without reasonable no- tice and opportunity for a hearing. Section 5(a) provides for the form and content of specific applications for grants pursuant to approved State plans, and al- lows joint applications by States, subdivi- sions, and private nonprofit organizations working on joint projects. Requires that the application shall describe the site, the proj- ect plari, and shall contain various assur- ances. Section 5(b) provides that the Secretary may approve any specific application filed under section 105(a) if it conforms to the regulations and State plan. Section 6 allows grants to be in advance or by way of reimbursement and in such installments and, on such conditions as the Secretary finds necessary. Provides further that amounts paid are limited to two-thirds of the construction cost. Section 7 provides for cntoff of funds by the Secretary when he iiirids that a State agency is not living up to the terms of the grant. . Section 8 provides for appropriate recovery by the United States if, Within 20 years, the facility is sold to any nonprofit organization or ceases to he used for the purpose for which it was constructed, _ Section 9 provides judicial review in. the courts of appeals for clis,satisfied States. Section 10 authorizes the Secretary to ap- point committees_ as he deems it necessary. Section 11 4ees terms.. Drug abuser is defined broadly, to insure inclusion of those who use barbiturates, amphetamines, and other dangerous drugs, as well as the opiates. "Facilities" are defined as "buildings or other facilities which are operated for the primary ? purpose of assisting in the treatment and rehabilitation of drug abusers by providing, under competent professional supervision, detoxification or pt,her medical treatment, physical therapy, family counseling, psycho- therapy, vocational services, help in finding employment, or other services." "Facilities" include facilities for medical care, labora- toriee,. community clinics, halfway houses, sheltered workshops. "Construction" in- cludes_ not only any new building but also acquisition, expansion, remodeling, and al- teration of existing buildings, and payment of architect's fees. "construction" specifi- cally does not include the cost of offsite improvements and acquisitions of land, , PROMOTING "I'RE .TWO-PARTY _ SYSTEM (Mr. W,AI4c.F0 of Mississippi asked and was given permission to address the House far 1. minute and to revise and ex- tend llis remarks.) , Mr. WALKER of Mississippi. Mr. Speaker, it is most gratifYing to me to see the election of two RePnblican may- ors and several aldermen and council- men in Mississippi. I am grateful to every candidate who gave his time and his eriergiea to promote better local gov- ernMent in our State through the two- party system. These candidates have Made a great contribution for the bene- fit of the people of Mississippi by offer- ing them a distinct ChoiCeIn solving the problems of local governMent. As a latecomer to the Republican Party, I can speak from experience. It No.1,01 ; 6 Is hard to make a complete change in your political party after a hundred years of family tradition. But, as time goes on, and as more and more Republican candidates are elected to office, we will certainly see a greater number of citi- zens openly favoring the Republican Party and the principle of two-party government. The entire principle of the two-party system is that the party of the minority assumes the responsibility of keeping elected officials in check. This, to me, is the only way we can be assured of hav- ing an honest and upright government. The results of yesterday's elections in Mississippi represent further proof that the two-party system in my State, as well as the entire South, is here to stay. I am most happy to extend my heartiest congratulations to these successful Re- publican candidates, and to offer assist- ance in any way that I can. Since 1963, the Republican Party and the two-party system have been making strong gains. The first Republican State representative since Reconstruc- tion was elected in Meridian, Miss, in 1963 and the Republican candidate for Governor polled nearly 40 percent of the vote. , . Since that time, our State has elected a Republican Congressman, several Re- publican State legislators, and a Repub- lican coroner in the State's largest city. Now, with the 1965 municipal elections the two party system made a historic strike at the grassroots level. Elected for mayor in Hattiesburg, Miss, was Paul E. Grady, a young conservative at- torney, and in Columbus, Mr. R. D. Har- mond, a former city councilman and Democrat turned Republican was elected as mayor. Other local officials who won election on the Republican ticket were: Mr. H. F. McCarty, Jr., of Magee, Mr. M. L. Brown and Mr. Pat Millis of D'Lo, Mr. Dorsey Hill and Mr. H. T. Miller, Jr., of Drew, and Mr. Lloyd Kilpatrick of Hollandale. We are particularly pleased with the Mayors vote in Hattiesburg and Colum- bus, two of Mississippi's largest cities. It is predicted that these victories will have a tremendous impact on our State and Pave the way for further victory increases In county as well as statewide elections. We feel that this is a stepping stone toward electing conservative Republi- cans in all future municipal elections. It has been claimed by many liberals over the Nation that the conservative Re- publican mbvement in the South has made its gains strictly on the race issue. This is not at all the case. I am pleased to report that these campaigns in Mis- sissippi were strictly decided on the issue of conservative Republicans versus Dem- ocrats, and in no incident was the race issue used in the campaign. in: j.....t COMMUNIST CUBA 'IRIES TO EXPAND U.N. INFLUENCE (Mr. ROGERS of Florida asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.) Mr. ROGHRS of Florida. Mr. Speak- ;? - Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 12471 er, Communist Cuba has applied for membership in Intergovernmental Mar- itime Consultative Organization. This group is a technical consulting section of the United Nations, and is composed of the major shipping nations of the world. U.N. Secretary General U Thant has asked the State Department to consider Cuba's application before the IMCO meeting to be held in London beginning June 15-18. The State Department is now considering Cuba's request, and will send representatives to London shortly. Communist Cuba has no business whatsoever in this organization. Cuba Is a dictatorship. Cuba has said it will abide by IMCO recommendations only when it suits her purposes. In short, Castro says he will not give IMCO much cooperation. ? We know that Castro is not very co- operative when it comes to shipping. Recall that on February 22, 1963, Cuban Migs fired rockets on an unarmed shrimp boat out of Fort Myers, Fla., when she was drifting in the interna- tional waters of the Caribbean. Recall also that an American-awned Liberian ship was fired upon in the international waters of the Caribbean on October 22, 1963, by Cuban craft. Castro's record is hardly one of coop- eration. It is a record of harassment and outright aggression. I urge that the State Department vigorously protest the admission of Communist Cuba to the IMCO group. BILL TO AMEND TITLE II OF THE WATER RESOURCES RE- SEARCH ACT (Mr. ASHLEY asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.) Mr. ASHLEY. Mr. Speaker, last year the Congress passed the Water Resources Research Act of 1964 to meet the need for widespread research on a variety of urgent problems connected with the sup- ply, conservation, and use of water, ever increasing quantities of which are re- quired by our exploding population to meet new industrial, domestic, and rec- reational demands, as well as for the age-old production of food and fibers. The Water Resources Research Act of 1964 established three grant programs. The first was to help finance the cost of water resources research centers at land- grant colleges in each State. The sec- ond program provided matching funds to assist States in carrying out specific water research projects approved by the Department of the Interior. The third program authorized grants or contracts by the Secretary of the Interior for re- search problems connected with the De- partment's responsibilities. While an impressive start has already been made under the 1964 act, there is considerable evidence that the water re- search program should not be confined to institutes which are a part of the land- grant educational institution system, ex- cellent as these organizations are. For this reason, Mr. Speaker, I am joining Approved For Releas 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 CONG SSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE June 9, 1965 three of my House colleagues in sponsor- ing amendments -,o the 1964 act which authorize the Secretary of the Interior tp make grants, contracts, or other ar- fingements with educational Institu- tions,, private foundations, or with pri- vate firms and individuals whose train- ing, experience, and qualifications are adequate for the conduct of water re- search projects, as well as with local, State, or Federal agencies. The legisla- tion which ,I am introducing also in- creases the authorization for water re- search to $5 million in fiscal 1966, in- creasing $1 million annually for 5 years and continuing at $10 million annually thereafter. The amounts provided in ?the act of 1964 were limited to $1 million annually for 10 years and required that arrangements lir der this Program be submitted to the Senate and House Inte- rior Committees, which would have 60 days to disapprove them. Under the bill Introduced today, this veto power would alo be eliminated. rider the limited appropriations made Mailable for fiscal 1965, some 43 States submitted detailed applications for funds for water research projects in their land- grant institutio as. Fourteen centers VinTe selected out of the 43 applicants. A summary of the nine major categories of projects that 1 ave been submitted for conSideration makes dramatically clear the need for the legislation which I have introduced and for continued support of a broad program Of research of our w tater resources: cArscc,rats Or WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH First. Nature of water. Second:Water cycle?including pre- cipitation; snow, ice, and permafrost; eVaporation and transpiration; streams and lakes, ground water and hydroge- ology; oceanic influences; and forecast- ing. - Third. Water and land management? Including water movernent in soils; water and plants; watershed protection; water- yield improvement; erosion and sedimen- tation; upstream flood abatement; ir- rigation; and drainage. ?Fourth. Development and control?in- cluding water supply; flood control? downstream; 115 dropower ; navigation; urban and industrial water-use prob- lems; recreation; fish and wildlife; estu- arine oceanography; coastal engineering. Fifth. Qualitiative aspects?including characterization of wastes; effects of pol- lution on water uses; interactions of Wastes; disposal of waste effluents; sur- face interactions; effects of development on quality; quality characteristics; and aqueous solutions. Sixth. Reuse and separation?includ- ing saline-water conversion advanced Waste treatment: improved treatment of Wastes; treatment of water; and use of water of impaired civality. Seventh. Hear ornic and institutional dSpects?iricluding role of water in growth, econom cs Of development and manageMent; economie analysis of in- Stitutions; area f,ppraisals. ? F.,ighth. Engineering systems?includ- ing design; materials; and construction, oPeration and m aintenance. Ninth. Illanpower and research facil- ities?inchicling education and training; and research facilities. mrrt PRODUCTS MtN- TitoICATION ACT (Ur. KORNEGAY asked and was giv- en permission to extend his remarks at this point in the RECORD..) Mr. :KORNEGAY. Mr. Speaker, the Preside at has signed into law one of the first legislative accomplishments in the adminiiltration campaign to advance the interest s of the American consumer. I refr to the final Enactment of an amendment to the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act which will permit iden- tification of fibers present in textile prod- ucts in quantities of 5 percent or less. This amendment will serve to benefit not on y those people whose livelihoods depend on the strength and growth of the textile industry, but the national econ- omy as a whole. Its primary beneficiary will be the American consumer and purchaser of modern textile products. As formerly framed, the Textile Fiber Products Iden- tification Act prohibited mention of fibers when -hey were not present in textile producs in quantities of more than 5 per- cent. Advancing textile technology made this section of the law an ana,chro- nisrn which impeded the consumer's right to know regarding the quality a textile products purchased. lit was clear that this anachronism of the law was harmful to -.lie general econ- omy and to the growth of our modern textile industry. Action to remedy this defect and to update the law was needed. This was recognized by interested admin- istration spokesmen and agencies?in- cluding the President's adviser on con- suMer affairs, Mrs. Esther Peterson?all of Whcm endorsed passage of this legis- lation after it was introduced. 4.1org with my distinguished colleague from North Carolina, Senator B. EVERETT Jam , who sponsored the amendrirent in the Senate, I am glad to have been in- strumental in initiating and advancing passage into law of this legislation, so vital tp the people of ray home area. tlut of equal, if not greater importance, I am especially pleased that this amend- ment does indeed represent one of the first legislative acts implementing the President's consumer interest campaign. It will serve to encourage and strengthen the growth of one of our Nation's most iropor ant economic segments, the textile industry?and thus, our economy as a whole UNDE R SECRETARY OF HEALTH, pDITCATION, AND WELFARE 'MIL- Stilt J. coETL/N ritzavErts COM- \TCEIVIIMIT ADIMESS AT STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE AT CORT- LAND (Ma. STRATTON asked and was given permimion to extend his remarks at this pdint and include a speech.) Mr. STRATTON. Mr. Speaker, last Sunday the distinguished new Under Secretary of Health, Education, and Wel- fare, Wilbur J. Cohen, delivered the com- mencement address at our State Uni- vessit f College at Cortland, N.Y., in my congressional district. It was a most im- pressive occasion and a very splendid ad- dress. Approved For Releas Cortland is one Of the outstanding, rapidly growing parts of New York's State University, with a magnificent campus and a fine, able faculty. It has had a great history, and under the lead- ership of its new president, Dr. Kenneth E. Young, it will make even more brilliant strides in the future. Surely Cortland College is making this area of upstate New York a great educational center, as well as a great industrial, ag- ricultural, and tourist center. In these circumstances, Secretary Cohen's address was most appropriate and most favorably received, as it out- lined the increasingly important em- phasis being placed on educational achievement by our Government. In order to bring Secretary Cohen's ad- dress to the attention of my colleagues, I include it at this point as a portion of my remarks: EDUCATION IN THE GREAT SOCIETY (By Wilbur J. Cohen, Under Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare) A long time ago, long before the class of 1966 was even born. I had the good fortune to go to college. I was aware that it wits good fortune, because those were the days, in 1930, when most fortunes in this country had crashed P:'ecipitously with the stock market, and parents and young people like myself were shaken by the great wave of ap- prehension that swept over the country. I new that I was lucky. I was the first in my inCinediate family to go to college. Many of my high school friends were finan- cially unable to go. But I must say that I didn't have as much trouble getting into and out of college as most young people have today. There were no college boards, no SATS, no really formidable competition. A high school graduate just presented him- self, finances permitting. If his high school record was less than impressive, some col- leges were willing to offer a second chance. Often there were more spaces than qualified applicants anyway, and many colleges were frankly happy to have enough students to teach. My first 2 years were spent in an institu- tion which no longer exists?the Experi- mental College of the University of Wiscon- sin. Some of the students of education have probably read about it. The college was the brainchild of Alexander Meikle- john?the prearient of Amherst College and one of the great teachers of this Nation.' A philosopher and an ardent advocate of freedom, Dr. N:eiklejohn believed that edu- cation itself aiould be free?literally free. It should be -freely sought and freely given. He had the idea that young people were so hungry and thirsty for knowledge that if you set out the feast they would come and devour it of their own free will. He believed that learning provided its own reward, and failure to learn was its own adequate punish- ment. His ideal was the Greek ideal of ex- cellence. The college was established to test this idea in a 2-year undergraduate curriculum. I happened to be there at that time, and for that I also count myself fortunate. Prom my point of view, the experiment succeeded. Within 5 years, Dr. Meiklejohn proved his contention that students did, in fact, learn as well in a free environment as in the traditional atmosphere of discipline and authority. He encountered enormous administrative difficulties. But the greatest difficulties were not ad- ministrative. They stemmed from the fact that this approach to learning?familiar as it was (since it was based on the ancient Socratic tradition), and effective as it was proved?was nevertheless completely alien 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Octy 25, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX A2641 General Life, the Fidelity Mutual Life, Mas- sachusetts Mutual Life, the 'Mutual Life In- an.rance Co. of New York, New England Mu- tual Life, the Penn gutual Life Insurance, h.oenlx Mutual Life, Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co. of Philadelphia, and the Travelers Insurance Co. ,????????=1M01?1411.1NIMmod:fr... Castro's Subversion in the United States?Part II =TENSION OF RtMARK Or HON. CRAIG HOSMER ol cALtrosisrni IN THE HOUSE co? REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, May 25, 1965 - Mr: HOSIER. Speaker, part II of the two part series of the American Security Council's Washington Report dealing with the subject of Castro's sub- Version in the United States written by DeWitt S. Copp is reproduced below. Part I will be found on an earlier page in :this Appendix. The article follows: [From. the American Security Council's Washington Report, May 24, 1965] ViisraO's SITBVERSION IN THE UNITED STATES Ata recent State Department briefing on Toatin American affairs, the briefing officer concluded his remarks with the observation that' the Communists had a chance to make a show case out of Cuba but they have failed Miserably. This cOnclusion was first Offered by President' Kennedy 3 years ago and it re- mains today as the accepted State Depart- tent attitude toward Castro and Cuba. Such an attitude fails to take into account that communism has never been a social or economic success anywhere; but as a show case from which to spread subversion, it has done admirably?and Cuba is an excellent example. Our Washington report of last week illus- trated the point by outlining the activities of the Cuban General Directorate of Intelli- fence. However, Castro's greatest success against the United States has been fn the` area of agitation and propaganda. Almost all his fieldworkers here are 17.. citizens. They are citizens who follow the 'Moscow, Peiping, or Trotskyite line. They range all the way from hardline Cominunists to soft- line dupes. A 2-year investigation by the Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security into the aotivities and membership of the how defunct Pair Play for Cuba Committee, organized in April 1960, proved that PPCC had been heavily infiltrated by known Com- munists and fellow travelers. Despite state Department's issuance of travel restrictions to Cuba on January 16, 1961, many FPCC members traveled illegally to Havana and, upon their return to this country, gave lecturers extolling the Castro regime. One of these was James Jackson, a member Of the National Committee of the Commu- nist Party, U.S.A. Jean Pestana, Rose Ros- enberg, and Helen Travis?all identified as communists in sworn, testimony before the I-louse Committee on Un-American Activi- ties?were indicative pf the Cuban guest list Which, riumlaered b vce,ss of /50 U.S. citi- zens Ova". tf2.-year period. The FPCd was, by any fair definition, a Commu.nist front. Ito effect on the Ameri- can public was negligible. But through its activities and tile close contacts some of its , members fornied with the Castro regime, there grew up around it other more militant groups. The most important of these was the Progressive Labor Movement. PLM was organized in January 1962. Its president, Milton 'loosen, and vice president, Mortimer Scheer, had both been expelled from the Communist Party for disruptive activities. In December 1962, PLM at- tempted to send a group of "students" to Cuba and failed because the Canadian Gov- ernment refused. clearance to a Cuban plane to pick them up. A year and a half later, PLM succeeded. On June 25, 1963, 59 so-called students, ranging in age from la to 36, left for Cuba in defiance of the State Department ban on such travel, They traveled to Cuba via Paris, Prague, and Havana. All expenses, includ- ing traniportation and living expenses while ' in Cuba, were paid for by the Cuban Gov- ettunent. Each traveler donated to PLM's Permanent ` Student Committee for Travel to Cuba $110. The air fare alone cost the Castro reigme $30,000. While in Cuba, a number of the "students" made statements attacking U.S. policies, par- ticularly in the field of civil rights and aid to South Vietnam. Some of these state- ments were beamed around the world and reprinted in Communist publications. In June 1964, the Student Committee for Travel to Cuba arranged air transportation to Cuba for 84 "students." Overall direc- tion appears to have been supplied by Lee Coe, west coast editor of PLM publications. Prior to his association with PLM, Coe was active for over 20 years with the Communist Party, U.S.A. This time not only did the Castro government pay for the entire trip, but it also gave each visitor $10 a week spending money. The leader of the "student" contingent was Edward Lemansky, who has identified him- self "as a member of the Progressive Labor Movement, which is a Communist organiza- tion, a Communist movement." An indication of why Castro has been will- ing to pay out in excess of $75,000 to bring certain U.S. citizens to Cuba may be seen in the declaration signed by 61 of the "stu- dents" while they were in Cuba. The decla- ration said in part: "We, the undersigned young North Americans visiting Cuba, offer these statements of support for the people of South Vietnam in their just fight for lib- eration from the imperalist oppression di- rected by our Government. Today our Gov- ernment is unleashing one of the most brutal and criminal wars in history. All over the world?in Spain and Portugal, in South Af- rica and Latin America?the United States supports racist and reactionary regimes which oppress the people, and that the intransi- gence of U.S. imperialism forces the people to take up arms in order to gain and defend their liberty." The essence of this declara- tion was widely broadcast throughout the world. On April 15, 1965, Milton Rosen, PLM pres- ident, announced the founding convention of a new Communist Party paralleling the Chinese Communist line; 110 delegates at- tended the New York meeting. A declaration proposed by the PLM national steering com- mittee said in part: "The most hated govern- ment in the world today is the Government of our country * * * the initials U.S.A., which once stood for hope, have replaced the crooked cross of Nazi Germany as the symbol of tyranny and death." One of PLM's vice presidents and its Har- lem leader is William Epton, arrested last August after the Harlem race riots on charges of advocating criminal anarchy. PI= .4413. three DM= 1,12 New York City and boast?of six others scattered across the country, one in Berkeley, Calif. PLM pub- lishes leaflets, booklets, and a quarterly mag- azine, and it expects to bring out a weekly soon, Its plain political thrust is aimed at disrupting civil rights progress and stirring racial hatred. Its members were active in the recent Berkeley campus revolt and they can be expected to be active in similar undertak- ings on other campuses. Victor Riese' in a recent column quoted a top Government security official as saying: "They (PLM) are a very successful and mili- tant band of young revolutionaries and have had ample money since the first day they went into business * * *. They don't just pass resolutions. They're zealously working for a revolution." The question is how much of their financial support is coming from Cuba? The pro-Castro pro-Peiping Communist movement in the United States has its man in Havana. He is Robert F. Williams. In May 1959, Williams was removed from his position as head of the Union County, N.C., branch of the NAACP for advocating violence as a means to gain social justice for his race. In August 19,61, he fled the country following a racial clash which he instigated in Monroe, N.C., and on October 3, 1961, the Castro gov- ernment granted him political asylum. Since then, he has been spouting racial hatred while offering instructions in terror tactics on his program "Radio Free Dixie" broadcast over Radio Havana and beamed into the Southern States. Williams also writes a monthly pamphlet called the Crusader. Every edition is devoted to the hatred of and the eventual revolutionary overflow of the white man. Publication and distribution costs apparently are taken care of by the Cuban regime. Lest anyone dismiss Williams as just an- other fanatical rabble rouser, it should be noted that when he traveled to Red China in August 1963, he was not only greeted by Mao Tse-tung and other high-ranking ChiCom officials, but Mao also chose that time to make his first official policy pronouncement in 6 years. As a result of his statement, Mos- cow charged that Peiping was guilty of racism and was "trying to set the colored races against the whites." In the winter of 1963, followers of Williams organized the Revolutionary Action Move- ment (RAM). Today, they have branches in six key cities It is they who distribute the Crusader and maintain direct contact with Williams. Some of them made the trip to Cuba in the summer of 1964. When they returned, recruitment was stepped up. They are known to have infil- trated the Black Muslims and the Malcolm X group. RAM's fronts include the Afro- American Youth Council, the Afro-American Student Organization, and in Detroit they set up UHURU, which means freedom in Swahili. RAM's manifesto advocates organized vio- lence and the -formation of guerrilla bands. Alined with PLM, it follows the theories and tactics of the Chinese Communists. Its present membership is small and selective and it refers to itself "as a movement com- posed of hardcore, young, intelligent, mili- tant Afro-Americans seeking worldwide black revolution." Until recently, the Communists chains of command could be traced directly from the Kremlin to the party here. Today, whether It be the recently formed W. E. B. DuBois Clubs taking their cue from Moscow, or the Progressive Labor movement taking its from Peiping, the impetus and driving force for both is channeled out of Cuba. Politically, financially, psychologically, militarily?Ha- vana is the directing center for a major share of the Communist agitation and prop- aganda in the United States. It is the se- cured outpost of .h_oth Moscow and Peiping in our hemisphere. In. the aggregate, we can say the threat to our own security from Castro himself is non- existent. However, he is the agent of a world force that does threaten our survival. As Its agent, his followers have been at work here; they are at work now. Because our security agencies are competent to handle Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A2642 Approved For Release 2 03/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 GRE SIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX ehu tg Hee Park, President of the Republic of Korea EXTENSION OF REMARItS CON mitt as PLM and Rk/VI is no cause to ignore 4 tnem If nothing Else, they prove the folly ?t ?sionsidering Castro,a failure. It is we who Wijthave failed if we allow him to perpetuate his regime, treating it as a nuisance and not a g4ritline and continuing threat to the entire hernisphere. 'Amazing Grace,' i New Book by Robert Drake EXTENsicisf OP REMARKS Os, HON. ROBERT A. EVERETT OF TIENNT.SgEt IN THE HOUSE Jr ilt-ThEsENTATIVES Monday, May 17, 1965 ,ltfr. EVERETT. Mr. Speaker, Paul Plowers has written an outstanding coi- tal= for many years In a great newspaper in the Nation, the Commercial Appeal. In his column of Tuesday morning, May 11, he prverly describes a new Iktblication, "Amazing Grace," by Rob- ert Drake, of Rig ley, Tenn. This column is so outstanding that I thought it should be brought to the at- tention of the Congress. The article follows: PA:CL, Prl.c1NERSY eiREENHoust ?Pfailtafew-Midssouth anthor. Robert Drake was born in 1930, and blessed With childhood In Ripley, Tenn. He is a Member of the English faculty at University Of Texas; arid enjoys close associations in Wleinphis, particularly With Dr. and Mrs. garattef Paster. litoOk; "Amazing Grace," is a pleasant tillectien 'of nostalgic sketches about child- ed in a West Tennessee town, with the tra- tfonal'enibeillihnielit of involved family re- tionslups, and -fillips based on the idio- crasies of small town characters. . Drake took his title from an old hymn, a?li th?i' IsR` strong thread of west -Vennessee religious life running through the :"iitigriett6.' It appeatb to be overwhelmingly -RAztoblogisaphical; certainly the author has a photograPhic memory for faces, scenes, sit- uations and people, and he is preoccupied With the ,religious life of the community and neighboring plaaes. 'Under the tit.e "The Fountain Filled With ISIS/0d," he traces the misgivings and doubts ,f0f, a small boy, pledged for baptism in the 'Methodist faith, but disturbed by divergent theologies and customs of communicants in dither "011tirches. arid other forms of baptism. rgelaptiir- (a einotions of country and ' Man town funerals, dinners-on-the-grounds, __ Singing bonVentions; his description of a coamtry 'store makes quite real the odors Of ate' oil, fatback, and roasted coffee beans. ? His 'dedicator' is to Donald Davidson, Austin Warren, "Evangelist," and Ofeantla-HroWle:,-"ApOStle." _ e airelieeli-n'fieSpient visitor to Mem- phis. H1C comes from Chilton Books, Philadelphia, at $3,95. e c(ustLiackin'erefrto the contents as s storieS, ' but rii-dre- rroTterly they should be called 'Sfref/dh-esOr Vignettes, unless the read- er can 'accept the modern concept of the short story, which avoids plot and denoue- ment. Mr. Drake's f)eri is facile, his eye and ear keen, his feeling intense, and his style brisk. The book should have intense appeal to all ; old eri6tign to remember small town life, the incidents of birth, death, courtship and rtiarriage, race relaticins, school, family plc- flies, church socials, and revivals. OF HON. JOHN M. MURPHY Cr NEW TORN r HOUSE OF REPRESENTATTVEB Wednesday, May 12, 1965 r. MURPHY of New York. Mr. Sp ak( r, under leave to extend my re- marks in the RECORD, I include the f 01- 1oWing 3peaker, on Monday, May 17, 1965, Piesid nit Chung Hee Park of the Repub- lic of fiouth Korea visited with President Johnson. The high esteem in which President Park is held not only in this count] y, but throughout the free world, is graphically illustrated by the New York Herald Tribune editorial of May 19; 1935. Under the leave to extend my reinarks in the RECORD, I include the editorial: A KOREAN REPRESENTATIVE President Park, now visiting the United States, represents many things. He is, above alt, the symbol of a state, South Korea, which proved that a massive Communist on- sittught can be thrown back. The symbol staid both as a warning to Red China and as a source of encouragement to South Viet- rilarn, the United States, and their allies. And President Park is evidence that, once independence is secured, a war-torn Asian country is capable of impressive political aci economic progress. Though his critics are numerous, most must agree that the Powe he holds today is derived from free (Sections. And though the economic prob- lems are still great, the support of the United States, now being reinforced by Ja- pan, has opened an encouraging future. The cost of answering the Communist at- tack on South Korea, 15 years ago June 25. was great. The fruits of that victory were grea ? too. Physical accomplishment is often the Measure of a man's leadership as well as tie country's progress. The following arti lie from the New York Times of May 19, 1965, indicates what hard work and hound leadership can do for a people who want to live in a free society: YEA' t. OF HARD WORK?YOUNG COUNTRY WITH 0 D HISTORY MARES PROGRESS; KOREA- UNITED STATES RELATIONS On January 16, 1965, President Chung Hee Part stated in his new year message to the National Assembly that "the accumulated , dirt of the past 20 years, which have been ape at in confusion and stagnation, should be ? overcome and scoured, and it is time that we , yolk real hard." This year, the fourth year of the first 5-year economic development , plan; he designated "the year of hard work." The political, economic, and social circum- stances of Korea had been very insecure in th( past, as attested to by the two revolu- tio as of April 19, 1960, and May 16, 1961. But with the establishment of the Third Re?ublic, stability has been recovered and th:ngs are now beginning to move ahead. '? The greatest problem encountered in the 5-;'ear economic development plan was the question of capital shortage. But with co- operation of friendly nations, sufficient for- eign capital loans have been acquired and investment goods have begun to flow in. Furthermore, sufficient energy resources inch as electricity, coal, and petroleum have bE en secured to support industrial develop- May 25, 1965 ment. Thus the base for fruitful work has been laid. For this year of hard work the Republic of Korea has established increased production, more experts, and greater construction, as her goal. To support this, many important projects are being carried out. The following is a summary of these plans: ? PRODUCTION Snair-iieicent 'of the population depends on agriculture for living. In order not to perpetuate the "intolerable contradiction" that food shortages persist despite such cir- cumstances, the farmland, with an area of 5,020,000 acres, or about 20.6 percent of the area of the country, will be further, ex- panded. Through farm improvement and technical extension programs, self-sufficiency in food grain will be achieved. To this end, the Government has estab- lished a 7-year grain production plan, and has allocated 3 billion won ($11,700,000) to help finance it. Through technical:guid- ance, the utilization of farmland will be im- proved, and through improved irrigation and other aids the unit yield will be raised. Also more upland will be bench-terraced, and tidal land will be further reclaimed, thus expanding land under cultivation and in- creasing grain supply. In addition, the plan provides for adequate domestic production of fertilizer, agricul- tural pesticides, farm tools, and fishing equipment to help increase agricultural and fisheries production. In mining and manu- facturing, coal; output will be 10 million tons, about double the 1960 level, electricity will quadruple to 770,000 kilowatts, and cement will increase fourfold to 2,120,000 metric tons. Sheet glass production is scheduled to triple to 600,000 boxes, and other major products will also be expanded. Also articles of daily necessity, including bicycles and sewing ma- chines, will expand four to six times over 1960 level. EXPORT Korea depends highly on imports for con- sumables, equipment and machinery, and industrial raw materials. Compared to the great import requirements, exports amounted to a neglightle $20 to $30 million a year, the principal export having been tungsten and a few ether commodities. Fortunately, owing to a concerted national effort Korea was able to expand exports greatly in 1961?to about four times the $32 million attained in 1960, thus achieving a record $120 million. This year the target has been raised to $170 million, and efforts will be made to export more and more manufactured articles. Thus by 1967 at least $300 million in foreign ex- change will be earned through exports, and the aims at exporting $1 billion worth a year within 10 years. CONSTRUCTION For promoting production and exports, var- ious new factories to support industrial ac- tivities will be built. The nation's resources will be systematically developed by carrying on coordinated programs for construction of powerplants, transport and communications facilities, housing, and so forth. Two powerplants now under construc- tion will be completed this year and power supply will increase to 111,000 kilowatt- hours. In addition, three new powerplants will be built. Also cement production will be raised, and the fifth cement factory of the country will be completed by the end of the year. Korea's shird and fourth fertilizer plants will be built with the aim of achieving self- sufficiency in fertilizer. Railway transportation, ports and harbors, shipping a.nd other transport facilities will be expanded and the communications net- work enla::ged. Thus construction projects will progress actively in many directions. Approved For IRelea e 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 ' ? ; May power. on Ma just, a elimim educat not on equiprx 25, 1965 . Robots are causing a new emphasis 's eyes to measure, Ills hands to ad- d his mind to select. They cannot te, however, the requirement for alert, d, and trained men. Machines do ate, they only duplicate. Automatic ent does not think, it follows orders. Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD APPENDIX A2633 time. We wk pay again unless we learn from the lespons of history. Peaceful co- existence is a notle ideal but about as prac- tical under idea's world conditions and by the Soviet de nition as total disarmament. There seems to be some difference of opin- ion as to why we are in South Vietnam. Here is my ooini. in. We are there to fulfill the terms of a contractual obligation. We are there beOuas, we were invited by the South Vietnamese to create a climate for political selftdetermination. We are there in the interest of :150 million southeast Asians and in our self-interest. We are there be- cause our Gewernment feels it is 'oetter to fight in Vietnam than in Hawaii, Alaska, or the west coast of the mainland. This is an- other inning in an overtime ball It is important that we recognize this fact of life. We are cot in southeast Asla to im- pose democracy nor should we be, _ Repre- sentative democracy is never imposed from without. It must develop and grow from within. 0114 di c tatorships and monarchies are made. Ilepresentative democracy is an institution or pclitical noonday. It is not the half-light of 'rolitical dawn. Having been 11. southeast Asia recently, I do not share the :ressimism of some. I found our military per mnnel ready to undertake whatever assignn.ent was given them in the Interest of freedcna. If the politicians make the right declaims, and at the moment they are in my jUdgm ent, I have no fear of the ultimate outcom e. Planned escalation is winning the war. It should be continued and accelerated if found necessary. There is a emal minority in Congress and elsewhere whio ac vacate a negotiated settle- ment of the War n Vietnam. This would be an exercise l futility. It might help them to remember that we are in a negotiated situ- ation at this tim3. Based upon past experi- ence, the enetny would propose as a basis for settlement a Foal tion government similar to the Laos-Troika. This crumbling monument to our naiveness is not calculated to serve well the inteaest of freedom. The enemy un- derstands only n tked power. I applaud the President's declaim to use such power. -- While our eyes are glued to the situation in Vietnam, our adversaries are fishing in the troubled waters of the Dominican Republic, Conditions in that island republic degen- erated to the pont that the President was required to statc:i the Monroe Doctrine from the Bay of Pigs and impose its terms there. He was justified n doing so. Our failure to wipe the scum of communism from our door- step in Cuba produced this untenable situa- tion. President Johnson, subscribing to the theory that Awo .Nrongs never make a right, acted with dispatch and restored honor to our country in this instance. Let us not compromise bur nosition there now and lose the peace after having won the war as has so frequentl/ hem the case. We can to ce Lttle comfort from the rift between Russia cud Red China. The Com- munist camps ar e barking at one another. This does not mean they have lost their teeth or their apptite. Kosygin preaches goulash over guns. ao ''se-tung preaches guns over goulash. Th p quarrel is whether the revolu- tion should lte futight on an empty stomach or a full one. Both agree the revolution must continue. The d.vision is not on what com- munism is. It's how communism can de- stroy representasive democracy. It is an argument of .ne.t: rods, not objectives. World domination s the goal of both, Marx is a prophet of both. We must understand the nature of the prctractive struggle. We must have no illusions about the meaning of the ideological cOnfliat. Our best araatee for peace is to keep our country eco omically sound, morally and spiritually ri ht, and militarily impregnable. Individuals must know when to push the button and why. Therp is a great stress on education today. This is as it should be. The serviceman is well ahead on this score. He remains behind in dna cial compensation. The Continental Army ommand operates 26 schools. It is based ight here at Port Monroe. It offers a selec ion of 600 courses. Three hundred and fif y military occupation specialists are aVailala e. One hundred and sixty thousand individ ala take advantage of this oppor- tunity km site. Another 200,300 are enrolled in corr spondence courses. The ducatIonal attainments of the man in unif rm are steadily rising Seventy-three percen of the enlisted personnel are high school graduates. It was ,:ti percent just 10 year ago. Only 25 percent of the Ameri- can m le population over 21, hat graduated from igh school. Eight percent of the Anaeric n men over 25 are college graduates. Sixty-iline percent of the officer corps today have college diplomas, 10 ysars ago it was only 60 percent. This makes him a better soldier It entitles him to more pay. The Pr?dent appointed a committee to e matter of military pay. The corn- has reported and recommended an adjustment of 4.'7 percent. This is Mad squate. essman MENDEL RTJERS, ct South a, has introduced a military pay bill, 25, to bring about this objective. I u will persuade your Congressman to this bill. . FOREIGN AFFAILS May we direct our attention to the subject of for ign affairs. There are some among us wh say that the foreign policy of this coun should be of no concern to any ex- cept t e' ones directly responsible for its im- pleme tation. With this I Co not agree. It occurs to roe that the foreign policy of this countr should be of vital concern to every one w o is interested in the preservation of our A erica n way, based upon a fundamental belief n God and propelled by our profit- motiv tel system. The purpose of our foreign policy should be to, protect and advance 'U.S. interests in world affairs. The purpose of our na- tionallsecurity program shculd be to pro- vide tie muscle to make that policy effective. The winds of slavery blowing out of the Sino-Spviet countries are on a collision course with tie winds of freedom from the West. The f ture of mankind may very well be determined by which wind prevails. Although men dream of a more fruitful use of , life than to spend their creative en- ergies building the instruments of destruc- t to tion, t ere appears be no safe alternative. Here a e some reasons why. On October 15, 1964, ikita Khrushchev, the recognized leader , of the worldwide Communist con- spiracy` and overlord of the most expansive colonial empire in contemporary world his- tory, was impeached by his own cabinet. Why? Because he failed to practice 100- percen't communism. He was replaced by the te4.m cr.! Breznev and Kosygm. In their first olicy pronouncements they declared a cont nuation of the 20-year cold war upon the 'U ited States and her allies. They called for an extension of their philosophy of peace- ful an4 competitive coexistence. Stalin, too, pra,cti ed coexistence. He joined the hated Social its in the 1930's. lie was allied with the d testable capitalists jr World Pg`ar-II. We paid for our naiveness at Tehran and Yalta, 'Kosygin will present his bill in due study mittee upwar grossly Con Caron H.R. 5 hope y supper Capt. Paul Crawley, U.S. Army, Norwich, N.Y., Soldier, Displays Gallantry Under Fire in Vietnam EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. SAMUEL S. STRATTON or NEW YORK N THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, May 25, 1965 Mr. STRATTON. Mr. Speaker, with all the detailed discussion that has gone on In recent weeks regarding the fighting In Vietnam -I sometimes think we are apt to forget that it is individual American combat men who are carrying out, with- out complaint and with very great dis- tinction, the heavy burden of our com- mitment there. One of the most fascinating and im- pressive stories of personal valor in Viet- nam came to my attention the other day with regard to the actions of a con- stituent of mine Army Capt. Paul Craw- ley, of Norwich, N.Y. The account ap- peared in the Norwich Evening Sun for May 11, 1965, and under unanimous con- sent, I include it at this point in the RECORD. The article follows: NEWSMAN DESCRIBES NORWICH MAN'S GALLANTRY A gallant Norwich soldier, Capt. Paul Crawley, was featured in a full-color picture and story on the front page of the St. Peters- burg, Fla., Times, May 2, The story, written by a Times staffman who had just returned from special assign- ment in Vietnam, told of Captain Crawley's gallantry under fire in a combat situation as deadly as any which took place in World War II or Korea. Here is the story as told by George Sweers, of the St. Petersburg Times. The incident took place on a 5%-hour patrol whose purpose was to capture small Red hamlets during which Captain Crawley acted as an adviser to the actual leader of the patrol, Captain Hong of the Vietnamese Army. Crawley said "My job is to work with and advise my counterpart Captain Hong * * * everything goes through him. "Hong does not speak English and Crawley, who has been in Vietnam only 3 weeks, knows little Vietnamese. This makes the advising process a complicated one. Craw- ley has two interpreters to maintain liaison with Hong." "The patrol started. I (Sweers) went with Crawley and Hong who were taking 50 of the 200 Vietnamese straight toward the hamlets." "As we started out, I stayed close to Cap- tain Crawley." When we were halfway up the hill, the first Vietcong opened light sniper fire at the leadmen in our group which had reached the top of the hill. The leadmen returned the fire * * * downhill into the hamlet and the rest of us hurried up to the peak and crouched behind the -concrete gravestones that dot Vietnamese hills. The firing stopped anti started again but this time "it was the steady chatter of a ma- chitaegun fire raking the cleared area around the village." "Crawley told his radic-man to inform the U.S. helicopter hovering over us that we were pinned down. The copter radioed back to ask if Crawley wanted rocket machinegun- suppression fire into the hamlet to get the machinegun. Approved For Releas 2003/Q9/26: CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Approved For Releqse-2003/09/26 CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A2634 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX May 2.5, 1965 "Crawley can't make that decision. He's an And once they get into the jungle they just adviser., That decision is up to the Viet- disappear!' narnese.COmmander. So Captain Hong came "How long they disappear, no one knows. scurrying up to confer. It's possible Crawley and his 'troops will have "Crawley told the interpreter the unit was , to come back to this same hamlet in a week pinned down. The interpreter told Hong. and Make the Vietcong disappear again. "For this day anyway, our little part of the war ,was over. We walked back home." Hong told the interpreter he realized the sit- uation. The interpreter passed the informa- tion 012.10 Crawley. "Crawley told the interpreter he was ad- vising Hong to ask for some suppression fire from the helicopter. The interpreter told Hong. Hong answered back through the in- terpreter that toO many of his men were too close tQ the hamlet wall. The helicopter's rockets might kill some of the South Viet- namese troops. "They, talked hack and forth, through the interpreter and pored over their maps while the bullets cracked 'overhead. It was a classic example of the language problem that has hampered these Milt U.S.-South Vietnamese operations since they began. Finally Hong convinced Crawley the heli- copter fire would be too dangerous and the armed Chopper was waved off. "The,Vietnarneee were pouring the fire in- to the hamlet now, the bullets chipping the bamboo Wall around the hamlet. "The fire let sip, a little. The Vietcong apparently were slipping out the back door and the first Vietnamese were entering the hamlet to mop up. "The radios started to chatter again. The Vietnamese radioman reported to his captain that one of their men had been hit. The captain told his interpreter who told Craw- ley. "Crawley looked around. The wounded man Was a sergeant in a platoon to our right. Crawley told his radioman to call for an Air Evac--in ambulance helicopter to pick up the wounded man. "The wounded man was too close to the hamlet wall, however, and would have to be brought out to an open field where the 'copter could land. "Crawley looked at his interpreter and then decided not to go through another complicated two-language conversation with Hong and the interpreters. "'Let's go get him,' he yelled to his medi- cal aid man and we were off and running. We found the wounded man on a grassy slope. His leg had been crudely bandaged. "Crawley still had to get the Vietnamese soldier to where the 'copter could land. Without saying a word he picked him up and ,started to carrying him toward the clearing. Spahn and I followed along as the American captain carried the Vietnamese sergeant through a paddy canal with water up to his waist. We reached a safe area several hun- dred yards from the hamlet and waited. "We could look back at the hamlet where the Vietnamese were spraying the thatched huts with submachinegun fire and looking inside for Vietcong. At one point a Vietcong guerrilla bolted from the hamlet and ran for the trees at the edge of the clearing. A hail of fire reached out for him but he made it to the trees, and disappeared into the jungle. "Wow we could hear the whirring of the ambulance 'copter in the Sky and Spahn Ignited' a green smoke grenade to indicate the wind direction to the pilot. He landed. We put the wounded soldier aboard and 'copter lifted off and headed for the hospital. "The:13attle was over. "The Vietcong snipers had fled leaving be- hind senile supplies and ammunition. The hamlet was secure-Let least for now. 13ut after the troops left, couldn't the Vietcong come right back, patch up the fort and start snipinl at the railroad repair crews again'? I as ed the eaRtain. "Wait a SUCCess?" lie asked himself. "In some Ways, yes. We got some, of their sup- plies but we didn't get them. wanted us us to get some of them. But their intel- ligence and ways of getting out are fantastic. CAPTAIN IS CAREER MAN Capt. Paul Crawley attended elementary school in Norwich. He was graduated from Valley Forge Military Academy in 1951 and attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy for 2 years before enlisting in the Regular Army in 1953. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Crawley of 17 Miller Street, Norwich, Captain Crawley has made a career of the Army. He was graduated from OCS at Fort Benning, Ga., where he took a ranger course. He was also with the 82d Airborne Division for 2 years, as a paratrooper, and made more than 30 jumps. Castro's Subversion in the United States?Part I XTENSION OF REMARKS O', HON. CRAIG HOSMER . OF CALIFORNIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES . . Tuesday, May 25, 1965 Mr. HOSMER. Mr. Speaker, the American Security Council is one of the Nation's most respected private organiza- tions dedicated to the preservation of the Nation and of freedom everywhere. Its weekly Washington Report invariably deals authoritatively with national and International developments affecting the Nation's security. The May 17 and 24 issues of this report detailed the pat- tern of Castro's subversion in the United States as written by DeWitt S. Copp, its able and authoritative managing editor. Part I of the two-part series is as follows: WASHINGTON REPORT: CASTRO'S SUBVERSION IN THE UNITED STATES WASHINGTON, May 17, 1965.?British his- torian and philosopher, Arnold Toynbee, be- fore giving a lecture at the State Department on April 16, 1965, was quoted as saying: "It's hard to understand why you make such a fuss about Castro," And then comparing the United States and Cuba to an elephant and its fear of a mouse, he quipped, "It's great fun for the mouse." Just a week prior to these comments, a CIA report on Cuban subversion was sub- mitted to the House Subcommittee on In- ter-American Affairs (Selden committee). The report stated in part that "the Castro regime has in operation (since 1961) a high- ly professional espionage and subversion agency, the General Directorate of Intelli- gence (DOI) . The DOI is advised by at least five Soviet intelligence specialists. Moreover, one of the purposes of the highly secret meetings of Latin American leaders in Havana last November was to give added impetus to more militant Communist activ- ity in the hemisphere." Castro's DOI is divided into three units, the largest of which masterminds the train- ing, financing, and promoting of subversion, and guerrilla Warfare In Ceneral and South American countries. Though the 'CIA re- port spelled Out M detail the degree of the actiVities in these areas, it made no mention of its efforts in the United States. Our own investigation attempts in some measure to fill the gap. METHODS OF INFILTRATION There are two known major points of entry by which covert Castro agents infiltrate the United States. One is by fishing boat to Puerto Rico, and then by illegally entering the United States with falsified documents. Congressman WILLIAM CRAMER, Republican, of Florida, in testifying before the Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security as far back as 2 years ago said that "* * * in excess of 1,000 people have come through this route into the United States as Puerto Rican citi- zens with falsified passports." The other method of infiltration is by boat or plane to Mexico. There the Mexican Communist Party supplies the proper papers and the agent crosses the border at Laredo, Juarez, or Tijuana. Infiltrators from Cuba who enter the United States using either one of these routes, or via Canada, masking their identities by whatever manner, are trained agents whose assignrnents cover the Marxian spectrum of subversive activities. INDICATION OF ACTIVITIES On the night of November 16, 1962, the FBI raided a workshop on West 27th Street in New York City. There they seized a se- cret cache of weapons and explosives which included delayed action incendiary bombs. They also arrested three Castro agents and Roberto Santiesteban Casanova, a newly ar- rived attach?ith the Cuban mission at the U.N. The other members of the Cuban mis- sion, Jose Gomez Abaci and his wife, Elsa, were named as fellow conspirators. The purpose of the weapons and the ex- plosives was for the sabotaging of defense installations and the demoralization of the civilian population. Attorney General Rob- ert Kennedy said the plan was aimed at the heart of the internal security of the United States of America. Four days later, immigration officers in Brownsville, Tex., reported that Mexican au- thorities had prevented the blowing up of the International Bridge between Browns- ville and Matamoros, Mexico. In doing so, they also nipped in the bud a sabotage plan to destroy major buildings in Matamoros. Two of those apprehended were Castro agents. Since 1962, there have been several allied cases, one taking place in October 1964, in which a bomb was exploded in the Ever- glades Hotel in Miami, injuring a number of Cuban exiles attending a meeting. Some months later, a Cuban terrorist threat to bomb the Roney Plaza Hotel in Miami intimidated the management into canceling a meeting of this same exile organization. This threat came on the same day the bomb plot to blow up the Washington Mon- ument, the Statue of Liberty, and the Lib- erty Bell was discovered. On the surface, this latter episode appeared to be the wild act of a quartet of misguided idiots. But there is sound rea- son to believe that, wild as the attempt was, the four would-be saboteurs were acting under DGI instructions. Leader of the bomb plot, Robert S. Collier, had traveled illegally to Cuba in the summer of 1964. Upon his return, he formed, with a number of fellow Cuban travelers, a pro-Castro, pro- Peiping group which called itself the Black Liberation Front. In December 1964 a United Nations party was given by the Cuban delegation in honor of its visiting guerrilla expert, Ernesto Che Guevara. At this party, Collier was introduced to Mi- chelle Duclos, a member of an extremist separatist organization in Quebec. Later, the plotters bought the dynamite in Can- ada, and it was Miss Duclos who transported the explosives to New York in her car. These five incidents fall under the heading of terror tactics. That only one of them Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 M Approved For Release 2003/09/26-: CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 ay 2 5 , 1 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD -- APPENDIX met with any real degree of success speaks well for the FBI and our law-enforcement agencies. However, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, pointed out in testimony before the House Subcommittee on, Appropriations last year year that the efforts of the Castro regime to infiltrate intelligence agents into the United gtatea "show that we (FBI) must maintain abroad coverage in this area of our operations." . How broad a coverage can be glimpsed by these additional incidents. In early 1963, a Castro agent was apprehended in a New York City apartment possessing a suitcase filled with visa applications and other docu- ments which would aid fellow agents to gain illegal entry into the United States. From Caracas, Venezuela, in February of this year came news of another type of smug- gling operation, which again pointed toward the activities of U,S.-based Castro agents. By accident, on board the U.S. ship Santa Rosa were found 1,000 mail pouches filled with pro-Castro literature. The literature had been printed in and shipped from Miami, Fla. , Just as Puerto Rico has served as an im- portant way station in Castro agents to enter the United States, it has also served as a transit point for still another sort of smug- gling?that of narcotic drugs. In December 1964, three Castro agents were arrested OA Miami Airport?one of them a Cuban, Mari,?argibe_o Nerey. Treasury of- ficials, in Puerto Rico said Carabeo Nerey was engge1 In drug traffic. How large the traffic Is an be ingasured by the fact that between January and November 1964, narcotics agents seized 691 pounds of drugs being smuggled into the U.S, froro. Cuba. This was an in- grease of over, 450 pounds seized during the previous year. Included in this amount was heroin, shipped to Cuba from Red China. In January 1965,a New York police inspec- tor, Ira Bluth, was quoted as saying: "Mari- huana Wed to came to New York almost en- tirely from Mexico, but recently large =Mints of 't,A.e, drug have been discovered corning from Cuba." On January 15, 1965, Oscar H. Reguera and Endoro AUrtin6z were taken into custody in a, New York motel with $3 million worth of cocaine in their luggage. Martinez is be- lieved to be a Castro agent. . Aside frorh. the obvious harmful effects addiction to th,ese drugs creates, the major purpose behind the smuggling of narcotics -into the United, States by Castro agents is to raise rnon,ey to finance an insurrection in Puerto Rico. , Castro's ,DOI is Working in concert with Puerto Rican, CoMmUnists and militant splinter factions of the Puerto Rican inde- pendence movement, accelerating their at- tacks against the social and governmental structure of the island. Since 1961, a num- ber, of Castro-supplied arms caches have been uncovered. Gun battles have been fought between the police and insurrectionists. Clunro agents have infiltrated both exile and Student groups, their purpose being to stim- ulate the kind , of rioting which would re- quire armed intervention. Should this hap- pen, the cry for independence, which 97 per- Cent of the Puerto Rican electorate rejected In thg November 1964 elections, would take on a more critical meaning. This is so be- cause the strategy of the movement is tied directly to the November 20, 1964, vote of the United Nations Committee on Anticolonial- isna. The. Committee voted 17 to 6, in direct violation, of a 1953 General Assembly ruling, to,place the denland for Puerto Rican inde- pendenee on the U.N. agenda. This ant ,played directly into the hands of Caktro'S 1?gl.ausi Puerto Rican extremists? ftWn of whom, are presently members of the . Cuban 1./N, mission. When the general Assembly convenes again, there is little doubt that agitation and propaganda will be stepped up in New York and San Juan, with the possibility of more violent actions erupting in Puerto Rico. SCOPE OF THE EFFORT Recently, the Puerto Rican newspaper "El Mundo" estimated that since 1960, 12,000 Americans and Puerto Ricans have received subversive training in Cuba. We cannot attest to the accuracy of the figures nor can we say how many of that number are under the orders of the Cuban Directorate of Intelligence. Although we do not have Castro-trained guerrillas oper- ating in our country as a number of the Latin American countries presently do, we can say that intelligence and law enforce- ment agencies here and in Puerto Rico take the efforts of the DGI most seriously. Of course, the publicly known cases out- lined in this report can only give an indica- tion of what is afoot. Hoary historians such as Toynbee may look down upon the world and view it from the vantage point of cen- turies. Unfortunately, we who have to live in the world from day to day and face its reality cannot afford cute analogies of mice and elephants with regard to Castro and our- selves. In part II of "Castro's Subversion in the United States" we will show how Castro's American supporters, using the techniques of agitation and propaganda; by forming front groups; by infiltrating the civil rights movement, and by attacking our foreign pol- icy are winning important victories in what can best be termed the psychological hot war. Champion Harebrained Scheme EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. JOHN J. DUNCAN OF TENNESSEE IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, May 25, 1965 Mr. DUNCAN of Tennessee. Mr. Speaker, I submit the following editorial by Mrs. Guy Easterly, publisher of the La Follette Press. This timely and re- vealing editorial appeared in the May 20, 1965, edition of this widely read and re- spected Tennessee newspaper. I concur wholeheartedly with the views presented and commend its contents to My colleagues. CHAMPION HAREBRAINED SCHEME Many people have thought the national ad- ministration in Washington has gone off the deep end so many times that there would be no more deep ends left * * * but these peo- ple have underestimated the national ad- ministration. It is with continuing amazement that we observe the proposals put forth by the ad- ministration and one of the latest is definite- ly a prizewinner?something of a humdinger among humdingers. The administration is proposing that the Federal Government help pay the rent for moderate income and needy families. This facet of the Great Society is called an "effort to Improve the American city." Improving the American city is a com- mendable idea, but the powers that be call "moderate" and "needy" families those with incomes up to $16,200 per year and who pay as high as $200 per month in rent. It seems that the time is long past due when the American people?those who strive to make their own way and who believe this striving is a good and wholesome thing? should inform their representatives in Wash- ington that they are tired of supporting such harebrained schemes as paying other peo- ple's rent, Raise Insufficient A2635 EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. KEN W. DYAL OF CALIFORNIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, May 24, 1965 Mr. DYAL. Mr. Speaker, under leave to extend my remarks in the RECORD, I wish ta include an editorial from the Daily Sun, San Bernardino, Calif., under date of May 20, 1965. The concern ex- pressed in the editorial about the pro- posed military pay increase reflects the thoughts and tremendous interest of con- stituents who have written to me on this subject. RAISE INSUFFICIENT President Johnson's idea of how much pay servicemen should receive is disturbing. He has grand ideas about many expenditures of Government but what he offers servicemen is properly described by Congressman L. MENDEL RIVERS, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, as "paltry." Said the Congressman: "We have been pa- tient, hoping for something encouraging from the executive branch of Government and now this?a paltry increase based on a false premise?and suggesting an effective date of 1966." The President's proposal is for an increase of 2.7-percent pay and fringe benefits to men with less than 2 years' service, and a 4.8-per- cent increase for the remainder. However, It is the total pay and benefits that count: Such as $2.40 added to the $85.80 per month for apprentice seamen and $6.51 added to the $241.20 base pay for a midship- man. Pay in other services corresponds. Young officers in all the services are drop- ping out at an alarming rate. They simply cannot raise families on the servicemen's pay. The dropout embraces all types of service; in the U.S. Navy there is an annual turnover of 150,000. The San Diego Union speaks out strongly in criticism of the President's low estimate of the pay servicemen should receive: "The failure of Congress to provide the minimum-level pay necessary for the essen- tials already is strongly felt in the military ranks. All top-echelon officers agree that the low rate of recruitment and high rate of personnel turnover has reached alarming proportions. "There is a turnover of half of the per- sonnel on a U.S. Navy combatant ship at our frontlines of defense. Only one-fifth of the Navy men reenlist after the first hitch. ' "Secretary of Navy Paul H. Nitze already has asked officers and men to extend their enlistments up to a half year because of the manpower problem created by Vietnam and the Dominican Republic. Other trouble spots can arise quickly, and the fleet already is far below manning strengths considered optimum. "The turnover is no reflection on service- men. They are patriotic and dedicated Americans. However, as with all other Americans, the welfare of their families is highly important. If they are deprived of necessities by remaining in the service or have to hold second jobs, the 'men lose in- centive. "The 37 members of the House Armed Serv- ices Committee recommended a military pay raise of 10.8 percent. Even this is a mini- mum. The administration's proposal is hardly more than a blow to morale." The President should increase his recom- mendation for an increase of 4.8 percent to the 10.8 percent suggested by the House com- mittee. The people have no right to ex- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2fiO3IO9I26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A2636 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX pee *the men of the armed services will con- tin le to work at pay scales far under those paid in private industry. Aliens and the Half-Open Door EXTENSION OF REMARKS Os' HON. FRANK ANNUNZIO or =tams N THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES -Tuesday, May 25, 1965 r, ANNTJNZIO. Mr. Speaker, in the C icago Sun-Times 01 May 16, Tom Lit- ti wood, of the Sun-Times Washington b reau, 'describes the aims and obstacles 01 changing the current immigration pol- ic es. Mr. Littlewood does an outstand- i g job in presenting the facts with ref- e enc? to our present immigration law a d the future of our country in connec- t' n with problems of immigration. Tom Littlewood ..s an 'enlightened n wspaperman Who came to Washington d ring January of 1905. Prior to coming the Nation's Can tal, he was for 10 Y ars the Spririgfielt? correspondent for e Sun-Times covering the Illinois State pital. Mr. Littlewood is a graduate of orthwestern University in Evanston, Ill. I take this opportunity to call again the attention of mir?colleagues In the ?use of Representatives the need for beralization of our immigration laws n this session of the 39th Congress. The article by Mr. Littlewood follows: AN ARCHAIC STWTE/VI Or QUOTAS (Hy Tom LittlewoOd) WASHINGTON.?The world is about to be ffered a revealing glimpse into the national onscienee of a. cour try whiase troops are eiSloyed around the globe inspiring devo- Dna to Its celebrated principles of equality and lustice. As have the three Presidents before him, Lyndon B. Johnson 'las informed Congress that the immigration law has long since outlived whatever alleged usefulness it might have had when the oceans were con- siderably wider than they are now. U.S. immigration policy is an outgrowth of the disillusion following World War I which gave citizens of the promised land a fe,eling of comfort and safety in isolation. The myths of that era have been disposed of, but the mainspring of our immigration pol- icy remains that re.ic of isolationism, the national origins quota system. Tais system can be understood most read- ily in terms of Peter Petropblous, his maid, and his mother. Let us assume th rt, Pete is an American citizen of some financial attainment who wants to (l) hire a domestic servant from Ireland or England and (2) bring his wid- e-Wed tinother from Greece to live with his family. Not unexpectedly, the United States is ehooty about who gets in. As the test for admission, the McCarran-Walter Act of 1952 perpetuated limits on the number of immi- grants based on the white nationality mix of this country in 1920. , More than two-thirds of the 158,361 quota numbers are allocated to Great Britain and Irelancl. Neither country consumed any- where near ifs quota last year. Pete's maid ca a be off the boat and on the job in 4 to 6 eica But. Greeeds quota is about 300 and there is Waiting list of at out 100,000. Even along a close relatives of citizens are given preference second only to needed job skills, it will 're at least 5 years before Pete's mother 1111 ie eligible for a visa. Italy's backlog it sti 1 larger, about 250,000. Plainly;put the U.S. policy is that the maid from Britain .s More desirable than the rela- tive from: Gr( ece or Italy or Poland or Spain or Africa'or the Orient. . The lav w is written in a spirit of exclu- sivity to beaetlt Anglo-Saxons, Scandina- vians, Garmans, and other noathern Euro- peans whose - countrymen had the good fortune lo be, like Finley Peter Dunne's Mr. Dooley, P lgrim father that missed the first boats." It was Mr. Dooley who insisted he mus "rsise me claryon voice agin' th' invasion + iv this fair land be tta paupers an' arnychists? re bet I Must?because I'm here first." , An even more invidious feature of the law is what has come to be called the Asian- Pacific triangle. This restricts aliens of re- mote Astan stock to the small Asian quotas regardless o ' their place of birth. The tri- angle reaches from India and Pakistan east to China, , span and most of the Pacific islands, but. excluding Australia and New Zealand. Attorvey General Nicholas laatzenbach has related the use of a young man from Colom- bia whe is eligible to come here freely on nonquota ssatus because he is from an in- dependent r ation in the Western Hemisphere. His wife, tco, is a native and citizen of Co- lombia. But she is also the daughter of a Chinese father. She Musa, therefore, be regarded as half- Chinese and eligible only under the quota for Chinese. which happens to be 105 a year. She ordinarily could reach the top of the list in the sear 2048. All alias, President Johnson suggested in his inimigration message to Congress, is neither good government nor good sense. It rulti in prolonged separation of fam- ilies. Keectd job skills are denied the coun- try.there is the obvious hypocrisy from AF d those ho spout off far and wide about the democ atis principles of fair treatment for all an yes insist on measuring potentiality for gond c tizenship in relationship to where a person happens to have been born. Mr. 'Johnson has promised congressional charngaona of immigration reform that once the decks are Cleared of voting rights legis- lation:he will push for the immigration bill. The amot nt of shove that he supplies will be a tirue test not only of his liberalism but of this presumably most literal of all Con- gresses. If it cannot be done by this Congress, it is hard to conceive how the system can ever be changed in a meaningful way. This is nevertheless, a highly emotional question bringing into play deep-down-in- side doubts. It's; Who do you want living in your "towa? But also: Will he someday be completing for your job? The pattern of opposition is a familiar one?the American Legion and other vet- erana groups who merge danger of subver- sion with the idea that ell foreigners are suspect; the Daughters of the American Revolution and other native-born patriotic socilties dedicated to a clean white Anglo- Saxon Pr otestant America. The Steuben So- ciety of German-Americans and some like gaciu,ps v hose memories are short. And some unicins who regard the automation and un- employment and relief problems as bad enotigh already. Although the national origins system was intended to place specific hmits on immigra- tion, broad differences aasse developed be- tween t ieory and practice. Ditring the past decade, an average of 63,- 000, of the 158,000 annual quota numbers were turned back unused by the desirable nations The unused portion could not, May 25, 1965 however, be spread around among the other countries with waiting lists. Nonquota aliens mer-aged 178,000 a year. These included the beneficiaries of special laws for refugees, war brides, and skilled per- sons, a relatively smal: number by private bill and 11,400 quota-free immigrants from this hemisphere. The last figure haa alarmed some Congressmen who have noticed the dark skins and relief incidence of many Latin American aliens. (The Government already has cut off the unrestrained flow of low-cost migratory farm- workers, the original purpose of the quota-free provision for Latin Ameri- can countries.) Total immigration has been running nearly 300,000 a year; from 1931 un- til the end of World War II, by contrast, im- migration never exceeded 100,000 a year. Although Japan's quota is only 185, almost 5,000 visas have been issued annually to Japanese. The Indonesian quota is 100, but visas 1,657. Italy's quota .is 5,666; visas 15,685 The first half of each country's quota goes to persons with urgently needed skills. Last year, for instance, 568 tailors were admitted, $28 engineers, 200 teachers, 198 doctors. Be- fore he arrives the immigrant must secure a specific job pledge from an employer. The next 30 percent go to parents and un- married adult children of U.S. citizens. The remaining 20 percent of the quota numbers are for spouses or unmarried children of permanent resident aliens awaiting citizen- ship. A history of certain types of illness, includ- ing epilepsy, tuberculosis, and mental re- tardation, is a permanent bar to immigra- tion. There have been cases in which a family has been prevented from, immigrating because one of the children was a mild epi- leptic, modern treatment drugs notwith- standing. Hearings have been partially completed by the immigration subcommittees of both Houses on the administration proposal for changing the law. The overall maximum increase in immi- grations would be only about 60,000 a year. Quotas would be reduced by one-fifth in each of the next 5 years, thus phasing out the na- tional origins, system over the period, and placing the retired. numbers in a pool to be allotted on a first-come, first served basis. The Asian-Pacific triangle concept, which Secretary of State Dean Rusk has labeled "overt statutory discrimination against more than half the world's population," would be abolished. No more than 10 percent of the total could come from any one country, though. Order of preference would remain about the same: the first half to those with skills or education "especially advantageous" to the United States; the next 30 percent to the un- married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens; and the remaining 20 percent to spouses and children of reside:at aliens. Parents of U.S.. citizens Could enter freely. It would no longer be necessary for skilled immigrants to nail down a specific job be- fore coming here. ' Epilepsy would be removed as a ban, and mental illness would not be an automatic prohibition for persons having close relatives already in this country. . A joint congressional-executive immigra- tion board would be created as an advisory body to decide which job skills are especially advantageous to the country. Among new seed imigrants, the President would be authorized to reserve up to 10 percent for refugees fleeing oppression or catastrophe. This year the immigration subcommittee Of the House Judiciary Committee was pur- posely increased from five to nine members so as to cope with its chairman. He is Rep- resentative Mot-1Am A, FEIGHAN, conserva- tive Democrat from Cleveland, and Repre- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67800446R000500080005-4 May 24, Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : GJA-RDP67:00500080005-4 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD =SIN spit of land in Peconic Bay, at which they landed, Conscierice Point. Notably, the first structure these set- tlers built, according to surviving his- torical records, was a church. Their idea's the people of Long Island and New York States in general have harvested, to the lasting benefit of all, We owe them our gratitude. ' When these settlers landed to Con- science Point, it was not their first con- tact with the soil of the New World. They had crossed the Atlantic Ocean to live in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the vicinity of what is now Lynn. How- ever, they did not find there the freedom best suited to their lives. They then formed a company Which received the King's grant carrying with it permission to settle on the far side of Long Island Sound, east of New Amsterdam. On first landing they were rebuffed by the Dutch at Manhasset. It was at this point they moved eastward by boat to the Southampton area. Where they landed, Conscience Point in the hamlet of North Sea, is now a historical park. The New York Times, in a recent arti- cle on Southampton's founding, quoted records of the landing's aftermath. ? With gifts and greetings, these Puritans Made friends_ with the Indians and were led by them along a trail through the woods, to What came to be known as Old Towne. Friendly Indians helped the settlers to live on the land. The first houses were built on what is now the site of Southampton Hospital. Today, the house built by an early settler, Thomas Halsey, has been re- stored through the efforts of the South- ampton Colonial Society. It stands as the oldest _colonial style house in the State, I am told. Other sites of interest include the Shinnecock Indian Reservation, the one- room schoolhouse at Red Creek, the Pel- letreau Silvershop, restored by the Southampton Village Improvement So- ciety, the country store, the Captain Rog- ers homestead, the 'Parrish Museum on Jobs Lane, the Whaling Museum, the Customs House in Sag Harbor, the Quoque Wildlife Refuge, and the Auto- motive Museum. I am certain that tourists from what- ever State will be interested in attend- ing the observance in which the com- munities that make up Southampton will take part: Bridgeharnpton, East- port, Hampton Bays, North Sea, Noyack, Quoque, Remsenberg, Sag Harbor, Saga- Ponack, Shinnecock, Flanders, Water Mill, and Westhampton. The programs, Including a reenactment of the Con- science Point landing, will begin in June and extend into September. Southampton's citizens, including its historian, Arthur B. Hull, Jr., are to be congratulated for planning a summer in appreciation of our splendid heritage and the makers of that heritage. CONGRATULATIONS TO HAROLD BEAtON Mr. BOGGS. Mf. President, on Friday the Senate confirmed the nomination of No. 95--?0 Harold D. Beaton, of Michigan, to be U.S. attorney for the western district of Michigan for a term of 4 years. It has been my pleasure to know Hal Beaton for many years and I want to join his legion of friends in congratulat- ing him on this well-deserved appoint- ment. I am sure he will do an outstand- ing job. My best wishes to him and his family. ANNIVERSARY OF THE AN REPUBLIC Mr. SMATHERS. Mr. President, 63 years- ago?on May 20, 1902?the Re- public of Cuba was established. Seven years earlier, the great Cuban patriot, Jose Marti, was killed in Oriente Pro- vince, in the battle for freedom. History thus reflects that the people of Cuba have long been committed to the principles of freedom and liberty. Suffering long under the yoke of Span- ish rule, they strove to carve their own destiny. But the people of Cuba have been too often betrayed by men who in- voked the name of liberty?only to seize power, to their own selfish ends. Now, in Fidel Castro, Cuba has suffered the worst betrayal of all, for Castro not only concealed his own motivations but also delivered his countrymen into the hands of Soviet communism, and now conspires to subvert the other nations of the Caribbean and Latin America. The recent events in the Dominican Re- public attest to the extent of the menace which the ascendancy of Castro has posed. Jose Marti said to his people many years ago, in warning them against tyrants: Re who intends to govern should be worthy of government. Marti saw the truth; but Castro, the false leader, has thrust down upon his own people a regime of oppression re- pugnant to the dream of Jose Marti and to all loyal Cubans. I am hopeful that when the Organiza- tion of American States meets, to discuss the new crisis in the Dominican Repub- lic, it will remember the tragic lesson of Cuba. I know that the United States will never accept Castro and communism in this hemisphere. The Cuban people will not be aban- doned. I know that President Johnson is resolute against the exportation of Castroism to the hemisphere, and 'will do all that is morally and legally proper to assure the speedy dethroning of that despot. The Cuban national anthem contains lines that describe the anguish of that nation today: ' To live in chains is to live submitted to opprobium and affront. The Cuban refugees who streamed to Florida shores and the brave souls who today fight from the mountains give evi- dence thit the fires of liberty still burn among Cubans. Every effort must be made by the al- lies of this hemisphere to contain, and then erase, the Castro infamy. 10987 Our other friends in the free world must now realize that Castro is not a comic-opera tyrant, a Lilliputian kicking the shins of the giant to the north, for the forces behind Castro are a threat, not only to the people of Cuba, but also to all in this hemisphere. We must, of course, restore the path to peace in the Dominican Republic. But we must also stick to our resolve to see that Cuba is Made free of its newest and most vicious tyranny. PROPOSED REVISION OF SKIP-ROW COTrON-PLANTING REGULATIONS Mr. TOWER. Mr. President, the board of directors of the Littlefield, Tex., Chan ber of Commerce recently directed a most important and well chosen letter to the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Office. The directors point out their concern about a proposed revision of regulations pertaining to skip-row planting of cot- ton. This is a matter which will be of interest to other Senators; and I ask that the letter be printed at this point in the RECORD. There being no objection, the letter was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: LITTLEFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Littlefield, Tex., May 13, 1965. DIRECTOR OF FARMER PROGRAMS DIVISION, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Office, Washington, D.C. DEAR Sm: The board of directors of the Littlefield Chamber of Commerce has made a thorough study of your proposed changes in the rules for measuring cotton when planted in a skip-raw pattern for compliance with acreage allotment. We have also made a survey of the feelings of the farmers and businessmen in this area. It is our conclusion that your proposed change in the ruling would be very harmful to the farmers and the entire economy of the south plains of Texas. The practice of skip-row planting has been recommended by various Government agencies such as the Extension Service and Soil Conservation Service. It has also been accepted by the farmers as a sound agricultural practice. The farmers tell us that the practice reduces their cost of production, conserves moisture and fertility, and increases the grade of cotton. Your proposed ruling would make it im- possible for economic reasons for farmers to continue this sound practice recommended by other Government agencies. Since the farmers are already caught in a price squeeze, your proposed change in the rules would bankrupt many of them and vitally affect our entire economy. The Littlefield Chamber of Commerce has voted unanimously to ask you to please con- sider not changing the rules on skip-row planting. We leave this vital decision in your hands. Sincerely, C. W. CONWAY, President. CASTROVILLE CHAMBER OPPOSES FIREARMS RESTRICTION Mr. TOWER. Mr. President, the di- rectors of the Castroville, Tex., Chamber of Commerce recently voted unanimously to express its concern over Senate bill 1592. In order that other Senators may judge the worries of Texans over this APproved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 10988 roposed legislation, I ask that a letter hich. I have received from the chamber e printed in the 12,Ecoao. There being no objection, the letter ,Ordered to be printed in the RECORD, follows: CASTROVILLE CHASID LEL OF COMMERCE, Castroville, Tex., May 15, 1965. nal:or Jour; TOWER, ashington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR: The directors of the Castro- ille Chamber of Commerce, acting in behalf f the civic minded citizens of this commu- ty, have voted unar.imously to express to ou their concern over Senate bill 1592, now U esaihmittee. We agree that the suppression t armed crime LS necessary. However, we re strongly of the opinion that S. 1592 will e not only ineffectual but harmful. Out- awing firearms or severely restricting their Wnership or procurement can have little ffect on those who are willing to break the aw, but such measures can place unreason- ble restrictions on the enjoyment of health. ul recreation by man:7 law-abiding citizens. tirther, a disarmed population is at the ercy of armed criminals or hostile forces. he battles of Lexington and Gonzales were ought by armed citizens to prevent the con- scation of their arms by a tyrannical gov- insolent. Thank you, and with best regards, I am Very truly yours, LYNN BOEHME, President, Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONG MIImlaesor.? VIDE TO WASHINGTON FOR THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED Mr. TYDINGS. Mr. President, several eeks ago, during t1.e hearing of House Strict Committee'e Subcommittee on apid Transit, I expressed my concern r the architectural barriers to our dicapped constituents. Since that e, I have been informed that an archi- ctural barriers project exists, for the rpose of providing information for the andicapped, as well as to alert the pub- I" to the need for consideration of the p oblems of the handicapped. The architectural barriers project has p blished a printed gaide to Washington fir the handicapped. I bring this guide the attention of Senators, in the hope at it may assist them in giving infor- ation to their constituents. The guides a e available through the District of Co- 1 bin Society for Crippled Children, the aryl and Society for Crippled Children a d Adults, and the North Virginia So- ci ty for Crippled Chi: dren and Adults. I ask unanimous consent to have p inted at this point in the RECORD ex- c rpts from the guide, including the table .o contents, and a fact sheet on the arch- it aural barriers projaet. There being no objection, the excerpts a d the memorandura were ordered to b printed in the RECORD, as follows: A C UIDT TO WASHINGTON FOR THE PHYSICALLY HANDICA ?FED Inde Re PI Sh roduction reacting this guide ve-up telephones els and motels taurants seurns, art galleries, .nonuments____ aters and auditoriums reat Lon ?es of worship pping areas and department stores__ Page 1 2 3 5 13 27 31 35 39 52 SS1 ONAL RECORD ? SENATE May 24, 1965 Index?Continued Page 55 57 59 62 65 70 76 78 81 83 88 91 Local OVErnrnent services_ "For further information" The metro= situation Directories of other cities.. Organ ati ons for the handicapped fIchoo Librar es_ Post 0 CI* Apartment s Hospitals, olinics, surgical supplies Federai Government buildings Transports tion Participati ig organizations_ INTRODUCTION The architectural barriers project for the Metropolitan Washington area is truly a communits? undertaking. It Ls sponsored by the Distrist of Columbia Commissioners Committee on Employment of the Handi- capped and by the District of :Columbia, Maryland, and Northern Virginia Societies for Crippled Children and Adults. Many organizations, both public and pri- vate, and nany individual volunteers have devoted hours of their time to the produc- tion of this guide. We wish to thank each and every cne of them. This directory would not have ben possible without the assistance of these gr nips and individuals. Fornis provided by the National Society for Crippled Children and Adults were used for surveying ss number of the facilities listed here arid ws wish to thank the society for its valuable st. pport. We also wish to express our ap reciation to the owners, managers, or employ es of the various places surveyed. Their coop tration made the task a much more please nt one for our volunteers. EADING THIS DIRECTORY This dire otory lists only a cross section of the facilitics in the area. There are many not listed that have level entrances; i.e., most stores, Service facilities, and movie theaters. Realizing that a step or curb is as great a barrier as a flight of stairs for many an otherwise cc mpletely independent operator of wheelchair and car, we have noted these whenever known. Curbs in the District vary in heights up to 8 inches. The average height ifs 7 nches. Thosq facilities marked with a "W" have been fonnd accessible and usable by a person in a wheelchair, restroom facilities always excepted. In all other listings the front entrance is level unless another entrance is mentioned, n which case it is the one to be used. f th !re is an attendant to park your car, if leader dogs are allowed, or chairs have arms, it will be mentioned if we have the information When restroom is on level this will be noted as accessible, meaning no steps bUt stall doors less than 28 inches. Most reetaumnt chairs are sturdy, without arms. , FART IC/PAT/NG ORGANIZATIONS District of Columbia Commissioners' Com- mittee qn t tie Employment of the Handi- capped. Easter, Seal Societies of the Metropolitan Washington area. African Msthosiist Episcopal Alliance. Americian. Association of Retired Persons. American Institute of Architects, Metro- politan West ington Chapter. Amerilan veterans Committee. Architect of the Capitol. ARFAK C. 3. Radio Club. Association of Oldest Inhabitants. Beta Sigma Phi Sorority of Belair, Bowie, Md. Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rotary Club. B'nai Bnai B'rith Women. Board of T'ade, Metropolitan Washington. Catholio Cid) of Georgetown. Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. Civitan, Club of Hyattsville. 92 Approved For Releas Connecticut Avenue Citizens Association. Council of Churches of Greater Washing- ton. District of Columbia Department of Build- ings and Grounds. District of Columbia Department of Voca- tional Rehabilitation. Episcopal Diocese of Washington. Federation of Business & Professional Women's Clubs, District of Columbia. Federation of Business & Professional Women's Clubs, Silver Springs. Federation of Citizens Associations. Federation of Civic Associations. General Services Administration, Region 3. Health and Welfare Council. Homemakers Clubs of Prince George's County. Hot Shoppes. Hotel Association. of Washinton, D.C. Howard University. Junior League of Washington. Indoor Sports Club, Inc., of Washington, D.C. Kiwanis Club of Washington. Methodist Churches of the Washington Districts. Minute Women of . Prince George's County. Multiple Sclerosis Association of Greater Washington. Multiple_ Sclerosis National Society, Wash- ington, D.C. Chapter. Muscular Dystrophy Association of Amer- ica, Inc. Greater Washington Chapter. National Association of the Physically Handicapped. NAPH Nation's eapital Chapter. National Paraplegia Foundation, National Capital Area Chapter. NOR-VA Cedarettes. Opening Doors. Paralyzed Veterans of America. PVA Capital Area Chapter. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation De- partment of Georgetown University Hospital & Student Rehabilitation Nurses. Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington, Inc. Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washing- ton. Smithsonian Institution. United Cerebral Palsy of Washington, D.C. VOICE. Washington Building Congress. FOR ADDITIONAL CO:PIES OF THISDIRECTORY Single copies of dais booklet are available at 25 cents each to Cover handling and post- age. Bulk copies are available at a discount price. Write to: The District of Columbia Society for Cripple Children, 2800 13th Street NW., Washington, D.C. 20009. The Maryland Society for Crippled Chil- dren and Adults, 9422 Annapolis Road, Lan- ham, Md. Northern Viginia Society for Crippled Chil- dren and Adults. 3501 Columbia Pike, Arlington, Va. To LIST. A FACILITY Anyone wishing to have a facility listed in the next edition of this publication should write to: The Distriet of Columbia Society for Crippled Children, at the above address, with information concerning parking, curb height, steps, inside accessibility, and, in appropriate cases (hotels, motels, apart- ments, etc.) information on bathroom stalldoor widths, basin heights, etc. Accessible and usable buildings will help over 202,000 persons. in the metropolitan area who are over 65 years old;- plus approxi- mately 50,000 with . heart ailments; 3,500 wearing leg braces or artificial limbs; 3,000, not in institutions, who are confined to wheelchairs; added thousands who, due to polio, multiple sclerosis or cerebral damage, cannot balance well enough to go up or down a curb or steps safely; and thousands more 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 1.0 62 ' CONGRESSIONAL RECORD -- SENATE subniitted to ).5 years of attack by the FDA that landscape is the necessary counterpoint without ever being charged in a court where he could defend himself on the rnerits.of, the case, Fredericks said he gained his doctor's degree from NYC` despite alleged attempts by MA to discourage the faculty from mak- ing the aware Over the years his broadcast- ing 'Career had been injured by a barrage of neWs releases from FDA's public relations office calling him "incompetent," Freder- icks said, and pointed out that FDA had seized copies of his books from a small vita- min manufacturer when the books were used to instruct salesmen. In his final ,statement, Senator Lorin said, "An. agency of the Federal Government has been accused 'of obtaining evidence at any price. * * ? MA prior to this hearing has been uncooperative with this congressional committee. ? ? ? We've never before had to subpena Government agents." LONG DISC said that "If the FDA spent less time spying on and_ raiding churches and small manufac- turers Of vitamins, and more time looting into the large firms which manufacture clan- geroits drugs like thalidomide, the situation Would be greally improved." ARCHITECTS WAGE "WAR ON T.71:43AN UGLINESS" Mi. RIBI(ZOF'P'. Mr. President, the architects of, America are being called on to a greater extent then ever before to assist local, State, and Federal officials responsible for providing a proper physi- cal envirOnMent for the people of this Na- tion, In a statement before irly Subcom- mittee on Executive Reorganization, the American In?titute of Architects reiter- ated its long-standing support for the establishment of a Cabinet-level Depart- ment of lousing and Urban Develop- ment, stating: The problems of urban America are so complex and mup,erons that they have aareuly exceeded the abilities of many corn- EntinIties to cope with them. The Institute belieyeli, that, their solution requires a ooPrclinated attack by today's society in which the recieral government's responsi- bility is undertaken by a Cabinet Rank Depairtment. ?. ReCently the President and Secretary Of Interior askedihe architeqt.s of Amer- ica to assist in the effort to Clean up and beautify the Potomac River, I understand that the New York chap- ter of the institute will offer a resqlution art the coming national convention of the AIA to estahlish a standing committee on the natural environment. The concern and interest of the architects is an en- couraging sign that we will win the battle against blight and pollution and the other environinental scars of our Nation, I ask unanimous consent to include at this point in the RECORD a copy the resolution referred to, There being no objection, the resolu- tion was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: RESMUTION To EsrAnusn A STANDING COM- Lanni OF TI4E NEW YORK CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS Whereas trii# region, and this conntry, AilltpI.Jespond to the rise In urban papule- '. ton py providing shelter, workspace and transportation equal to this tremendous in- creas6; and Whereas the aim of the architect is to con- ,. . serve intelligently and creatively while buildtng intelligently, whereas the failure to preserve natural areas is virtually irre- trievable, and Whereas the architect believes to the cityscape: Therefore this resolution Moves to estab- lish a standing committee of the chapter, to be called the committee on the natural environment and further sets forth the pur- poses of this committee would be? To reassert and amplify the position that the informed soncern of the architect is for. the total environment of man, and for all elements of the scene and of the natural environment?of air, water, and land as well as for the urban scene; To seek to make policymakers fully con- scious of the need to consider the esthetics of the natural environment and to be aware of the contribution which the design profession can make in this regard; To foster studies of programs and tech- niques for identifying and preserving the remnants of the national inheritance and of restoring natural environments, particu- larly those in or near urban areas; To raise the collective voice and to use the influence of the architect in support of those forces working toward eradication of air and water pollution and toward esthe- tically acceptable solutions to solid waste, disposal; o establish permanent personal liaison with the guiding minds of all organizations concerned with the natural environment so as to engender an exchange of ideas, to foster working relationships and to develop action programs for the consideration of this chap- ter; To seek to join with other chapters and with the other design professions?land- scape architects, planners, industrial design- ers, and engineers?in initiating a full scale program of research to creatively deal with the outrages of signscape, junkscape, wire- scape, wastescape, dozerscape, siltscape, and all other visual desecrations of the natural environment; To actively seek philanthropic funds for the establishment of staffed programs con- cerned with the matters herein set forth? either on a permanent or task force basis; and it is further Resolved, That these matters be brought before the forthcoming convention of the institute for consideration by the national body; and it is also resolved ,that the insti- tute be urged to expand the war on urban ugliness program to include suburbia, ex- urbia, nd rural and wild America. THIRD ANNIVERSARY OF THE CUBAN REPUBLIC Mr. DODD. Mr. President, today, May 20, we celebrate the 63d anniversary of the establishment of the Cuban Re- public. It is a day that is celebrated by all People and by all the freedom loving cit- izens of the Americas. It is one of the great tragedies of his- tory that the Cuban people, who fought so heroically and sacrificed so much to win their freedom from Spanish imperial rule, should now be oppressed by an in- finitely more ruthless and inhuman form of colonialism. There are those who say that it is wrong for America to intervene in Cuba, even to the limited extent of granting tolerance to the thousands of Cuban freedom fighters who are working for the liberation of their country from abroad. They say that if the Cuban people want communism, that is their business. I find it difficult to understand the blindness and the total lack of humani- - Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 May 20, 1965 tarian feeling or morality suggested by this attitude. The Castro regime did not come into existence because the Cuban people wanted communism. The fact is that the Cuban people were never given this option?and if they had been given this option I am certain that they would have rejected communism overwhelmingly. The Cuban people wanted more liberty, they wanted an end to the abuses that had characterized the Batista re- gime, they wanted a return to constitu- tional democratic government. It was these things and not commu- nism that Castro promised the Cuban people. And if Castro enjoyed a brief period of popularity after he came to power, it was because the Cuban people truly be- lieved that he was going to give them freedom and democracy. But it soon became apparent, even to those who had doubted, that the Castro movement was neither nationalist nor democratic, that it was controlled by a small number of hard core Communists, bent on converting Cuba into a totali- tarian satellite of world communism. The Cuban people soon came to realize, too, that the Castro regime was not a reform movement, but a quisling tyranny created by the Kremlin as a base for the subversion of Latin America. The 200,000 Cuban refugees who abandoned everything they possessed to escape from Castro's paradise, attest to the intense hatred of the Cuban people for this regime of oppression and misery and national treason. The thousands of Cuban patriots who are fighting in the mountains, in open defiance of Castro's firing squads, also attest to this. Every day witnesses new acts of re- sistance by the Cuban people, while new guerrilla bands and new resistance lead- ers continue to spring up to take the place of those who have fallen in the struggle. The recent events in the Dominican Republic should be an adequate answer to those who, while they do not like Castro, tell us that Castro should be re- garded as a nuisance rather than a dag- ger at our throats. Only the courageous and resolute ac- tion of President Johnson prevented the emergence of a second Castro regime in the Carribbean. I believe this is now realized by the great majority of the Latin American diplomats stationed in Santo Domingo and by the great major- ity of the governments of the Americas. But, even though the Communists have been frustrated in the Dominican Re- public, the danger to the security and independence of the Latin American countries will remain serious so long as the Castro regime is permitted to exist. Communists never give up unless they are decisively defeated. The setback in Santo Domingo will not discourage Cas- tro. On the contrary, there is every reason to believe that his apparatus of trained agents and guerrilla fighters is even now planning more uprisings in other Latin American countries. As I have stated on previous occasions, I believe we have been too passive in our d y 2 Approved For Relealk2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 1965 CONGRESSION , L RECORD ? SENATE ? 10661 want to assure my colleagues that god progress is being made in resource d velopm nt in my home State of Wis- e nsin. lIn a pti. Union statement of the National Farmers last March it was con- tended that almost two-thirds of our cropland can construCtively use con- s4rvatiox treatment. Furthermore, tlaree-foi4rths of our privately owned pasture nd rangeland and more than half of ur private forests can benefit from co4servstion treatment. Pollution o streans and siltation of resources are commonplace. , The N tional Farmers Union urges the Federal ,Government to get on more ^ pidly 'with the soil and water con- rvatior work in America. .. ask unani- ous consent that the policy statement o the National Farmers Union be p inted n the RECORD. I There being no objection, the state- ment wa,s ordered to be printed in the RECORD, s follows: EXCERPT ROM 1965 POLICY STAT IMENT OP NA-' TIONAL FARMERS UNION ! AGRIC1JLTUEAL CONSERVATION AND LAND USE , Techni al assistance in soil and water con- rvation 1 should continue to be extended rough lbcal soil conservation districts, goy- . ed by democratically elected committees. , The conservation needs inventory estab- lished the fact that our investment in con- servation?both public and private?is run- ning onl at one-third of the desired level df $2.5 b Ilion annually. Almcst two-thirds 4.if our opland needs conservation treat- eiat. ee-fourths of our privately owned p ture and rangeland and more than f of r ourva t io private rea troo foreste t .Pollution and woodlandf o (Ineeeds realms nd siltation of reservoirs are com- onplac , Pedera cost sharing with farmers is a major in, entive, in the effort to meet the deed for !conservation of those resources. It produces conservation far beyond its public Cost. We support, therefore, increasing tunds for the SCS and ACP in keeping with iionservation needs inventory. i The Great Plains conservation program has bee in use long enough to prove its Value in sch1ev1ng land Use adjustment and Le corvation of land and water. We comme d that its principles be extended to includje all agricultural land in the United tates. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND COST SHARING Each family farmer and rancher should have conveniently available to him corn- etent federally financed technical assistance nd adecjuate cost-sharing programs needed y him t develop and put into operation his wn tec nica:ly sound conservation plan, so that he inay use each acre of his farmland thin i s capabilities and tz eat it in ac- ordance with its need for protection and mprovezient including' all the soil, water nd tim er resources upon which his fam- Isi's liv ihood and the Naticn's long-term ecurity epend. We ar unalterably opposed to the Budget Bureau roposal for Congress to authorize a evolvin fund through which soil conserve- ion di tricts and farmers and ranchers would p y the Federal Ciovernment a part of he cost of technical assistance. EXTE SION OF MEDICAL ASSIST- ANC TO NEEDY BLIND AND DIS- I ABL D PERSONS?RESOLUTION OF ISCONSIN LEGISLATURE LMr. PROXMIRE. Mr. Fresident: re- ently he Wisconsin Legis] attire Passed a joint resolution asking Congress to broaden the prcnisions of the Kerr- Mills Act, Public Law 86-778. The resolution would extend medical assistance to needy persons who are blind and disabled, even though they are un- der 65 years of 'age I ask unaninious consent that the joint resolution be printed in the RECORD: There being nc objection, the joint resolution was: orcered to be printed in the RECORD, as loll aws : SENATE JotNT RESOLUTION 9 Joint resolution :memorializing the Congress of the United States to amend the Kerr- Mills Act, Public taw 88-778 Resolved by the Sf nate (the assembly con- curring), That this legislature respectfully petitions the Chrigr 3ss of the United States to amend the Xers-Mills Act, Public Latv 88-778, to include medical assistance to needy persons who are alind or disabled even though under 65 years of age; be it further Resolved, Thl a c .uly attested copy of this resolution be i nediately transmitted to the Secretary of the Senate of the United States, the Clerk of the E.ouse of Representatives of the United Slates, and to each Member of the Congress from ;his State. PK MICK J. SEREEY, I resident of the Senate. WI.LIANE P. NUGENT, ' Ch'ef Clerk of the Senate. ROBERT T. Huss, Speaker of the Assembly. JA MKS S. BUCKLEY, Chief Clerk of the Assembly. BIG BROTRER- -SENATE INVESTI- GATION OF TACTICS OF HEALTH LAW ENFORCERS Mr. LONG: of Missouri. Mr. 'Presi- dent, my "Big Brother" item today is a very good review in Health Bulletin, of May 1,1965, of our hearings on invasions of privacy by the :Pood and Drug Admin- , stration. I ask unanimous consent that the article be printed at this point in the RECORD. There being no objection, the article was ordered tO be printed in the RECORD, as follows: ; SENATE INVESTI,ATIONS EXAMINERS TACTICS OF HEAleril :-.15V ENFORCERS Does the Ford and Drug Administration take out after ,food supplement sellers and supposed health quacks with methods that trample on sirens' constitutional rights? The Senate Su cou rnittee on Administrative Practice and Procedure, headed by Senator EDWARD V. LONG, 13 taking a close look at that question In a series of hearings, which started this week. Spokesmen for the vitamin and food sup- plement induFDA oppose to all dietary supple:nenta- r is y told the Senators that. tion as supetfluc us and unneeded, even though Government studies indicate that many familes o rot have diets considered best for the maintenance of good health and physical well-being. They objected to FDA's use of listening devices, concealed. radio transmitter and waat they- called discrimi- natory enforcemert methods against food supplement sellers. K. W. Dilling, an attor- ney and geneial counsel for the National Association of Ford Supplement Manufac- turers and Dietributors also scored FDA's efforts to brat*" dietary supplementation as "quackery" or "food faddism." "Notably absent has been ay FDA publicity deplor- ing extensive lase af cigarettes, soft drinks, alcoholic bevetagez , candy, and other items which make n contribution to the national Approved For Releas health, and which in fact are often harmful," Dilling said. Ellis Arnall, former Governor of Georgia and chief witness during the first day of hearings, submitted documents to support a charge that "The Food atd Drug Admin- istration is corrupt; they contaminate and they have lied in court." He introduced documents to support his contention. The charge of perjury was made primarily against Glenn E. Schreiber, an FDA inspector who Arnall claims lied 28 times 'ander oath dur- ing proceedings brought against PI esto Foods, Ine., of Kansas City, Five officials of FDA are appearing before the committee this week. ;Senator Lona re- quested the hearing because FDA's Kansas City office employed concealed electronic recording devices in an at;empt to secure evidence of mislabeling of Presto Foods' Al- lerjoy, a product sold as a milk substitute for children and adults allergic to milk". FDA Commissioner George P. Larrick told. the committee that his agency uses electronic transmitting and recording equipment to en- force laws against sales of amphetamines and barbiturates. "Radio transmitters are used also to enable us to follow the progress of our own undercover man and determine when his life is in danger because of the character of the individuals he must contact to detect law violations," "Airsick told LONG. The Kansas City case required that FDA inspector Schreiber seize a pamphlet about Allerjoy from two lady schoolteachers who allegedly were demonstrating it in a super- market at Shawnee Village, Kans. "In view of the simplicity of this case, I can't see the need for use of electronic equipment and Gestapo tactics," Loam comnented. The electronic gear in question?that used in the Kansas City seizure?is known as a Kel-Kit unit. It consists of a wireless trans- mitter about the size of a package of cigar- ettes, which broadcasts monitored conversa- tions to a receiver and taoe recorder con- cealed in a briefcase. In his appearance before the subcommittee, Dining gave this opinion of the use of recording devices by FDA: "This is trampling upon traditional American rights. The planting of these de- vices is thoroughly un-American and thor- oughly reprehensible." In answer to a ques- tion by Senator LONG, Dilling said that "the use of 'snooping devices' is a very common practice of this agency ? * I* sometimes they 'bug' a whole house. ? * ? It's been my experience in dealing with FDA cases that the use of these devices is extensive, general, and accepted by this agency." Dilling's testimony came in the face of A. E. Rayfield's contention that FDA uses electronic record- ing equipment only in eirUeme situations. Raylleld is Director of the Bureau of Regu- latory Compliance. During the 3 days of hearings, Loam's committee also heard testimony from Oscar H. Brinkman, attorney for Washington's Church of Scientology and from Wayne Rohrer, the church's minister. Brinlcman attacked the FDA for seizing a religious ma- chine which he said merely measured emo- tional reactions. At the same time FDA condoned dangerous use of electric shock de- vices by psychiatrists, Brin_kman said, even though they had led to some people being electrocuted. Brinkman told LONG that Federal officials accompanied by 6 to 10 or more armed U.S. marshals swarmed the church, grabbed books from the hands of students and ministers, broke into confes- sional rooms, and invaded the privacy of ministers. Be said that FDA had not pre- viously requested that use of the machine be halted. On Thursday Senator LONG and nutrition- ist Carlton Fredericks said that FDA con- centrates on small companies and persons with unusual approaches to disease and goes easier on big companies. Fredericks told the Senate Judiciary Suboominittee studying in- vasion of private rights that he had been 2003/09/26 : C1A-RDP671500446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 May AO, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? SENATE attitude toward the Castro regime. We have been too prone to accept its exist- ence as permanent, too willing to place restriction on Cuban freedom fighters seeking the liberation of their country. It is ray hope that the current events In the Dominican Republic will cause the people of the Americas to open their eyes, and encourage them to more reso- lute measures and to greater unity in dealing with the common menace of Cas-_ troism. It is my hope that the governments of the Americas will see fit to commit them- selves to a declaration of freedom and independence for the Cuban people. It. is my hope that the free world na- tions now trading with Cuba will give more consideration to the fact that their trade makes it easier for Castro to keep the Cuban people in chains. Finally, it is my hope that we will show at least as much tolerance toward Cuban freedom fighters seeking to operate from our shores as we showed for the agents Of the Castro movement who used the United States as their chief base of op- eration when they were working for the overthrown of Batista. Castro must go. And I am as con- fident as I am of anything that the day Is not too far distant when the Cuban People?hopefully with our assistance-- will toss Fidel Castro and his quisling henchmen into the dust bin of history, to join the many other tyrants and des- pots who have been discarded by people who suffered much but who one day de- cided they would no longer tolerate tyr- anny. hope that we in America, in observing this occasion will commit ourselves anew to the support of the Cuban people in the heroic struggle they are today wag- ing for liberation from the monstrously Inhuman regime that governs their coun- try. BANK MERGER ACT Mr. ROBERTSON. Mr, President, this morning Reno Odlin, president of the American Bankers Association, and chairman of the board of the Puget Sound National Bank, of Tacoma, Wash., appeared and spoke in support of Senate bill 1698, before the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions, of the Senate Committee on Banking and Currency. His complete and illuminating statement shbws the confusion and controversy which now exist in the field of bank mergers, and explains the reason why en- actment of my bill, S. 1698, to amend the Bank Merger Act, is needed in order to clear up the situation. I ask unanimous consent to have his statement printed at this point in the RECORD. There being no objection, the state- ment was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: STATEMENT OF RENO ODLIN My name is Reno Odlin. I am president of the kmeri,Call Bankers Association and chair- man,ot tbe board of the Puget Sound Na- tional Bank, Tacoma, Wash. I am appearing here today on behalf of the association in support of S. 1698, a bill designed to eliminate the confusion and chaos surrounding the whole question of bank mergers. Before making specific comments on the bill under consideration, it might be well to take a brief look at some of the economic factors that have prompted mergers in all lines of business and commerce since World War II. One of the prime reasons for mergers is the lack of qualified successor management. Many industries were not hiring new em- ployees during the 1930's because they didn't need them. They didn't hire them during the war years because they couldn't get them. As a result some companies lacked depth in management and when it came time for top executives to retire there were not enough capable and experienced men coming along behind them. Many smaller companies solved this problem through mergers with larger firms that had larger pools of talent. This same pattern held true in banking and prompted many mergers. The second major reason for bank mergers was directly related to the dynamic perform- ance of the economy. In the past two dec- ades, the economy, measured in terms of out- put of goods and services, generally referred to as the gross national product, has grown by 192 percent, reaching an annual rate of $623 billion at the end of 1964. But while GNP was rising by 192 percent, commercial and industsial loans were increasing by 480 percent, rising to more than $55 billion in mid-1964. Domestic private investment dur- ing the same 20-year period rose by '750 per- cent to nearly $88 billion at the end of 1964. Over the two decades, expenditures for plant and equipment jumped by 470 percent, The rapid increase in economic activity caused a quickened rate of growth in the size of many corporations which in turn put presure on banks for more diversified serv- ices. As credit demands of corporations grew, some smaller banks began to feel the restrictions on their lending limits and de- cided that mergers would enable them to in- crease their lending capacities. The third element encouraging mergers has been the efforts of commercial banks to meet the financial needs of the American public during a period of expansion and rapidly changing economic and population patterns. These developments have resulted in a huge demand for a growing variety of bank services, particularly those oriented toward consumers which involve high-vol- ume operations. For example, some merg- ers have occurred Baa result of two small or medium-sized banks desiring to obtain the modern and expensive electronic data- processing equipment that has spread so rapidly in banking in the past decade. Finally, some bank mergers have occurred In recent years as a result of the efforts of the bank regulatory agencies to prevent a bank suspension. These so-called "shotgun mergers" can do much to preserve the sta- bility and strength of the banking system. But it should be obvious that the manage- ment of any bank approached by the regula- tory authorities with a request that it ab- sorb a weak bank in the community would be very reluctant to do so if the merger might be subsequently challenged in the courts on the grounds of competition alone. Those of us who make our living in bank- ing, as well as experienced observers of the banking scene, know full well that competi- tion in banking?and between banks and other financial institutions?is stronger today than at any time in the past. It is my own judgment that on balance the many bank mergers in the postwar pe- riod, rather than diminishing competition, have in fact led to increased competition, both among banks and between banks and other types of financial institutions. BACKGROUND OF THE BANK MERGER ACT In 1950, section '7 of the Clayton Act was amended to prohibit mergers through asset acquisition as well as stock acquisition in 10663 any line of commerce in any section of the country where the result could tend to reduce competition substantially. The amendment, however, covered only corpora- tions under the jurisdiction of the Federal Trade Commission. Banks have never been under the jurisdiction of the Fro. During the 1950's, as the number of bank mergers increased, the Justice Department sought legislation to subject banks to the new section 7 of the Clayton Act. The Jus- tice Department wanted the change because It recognized that it lacked authority under section 7 of the Clayton Act as amended. Moreover, until recently, it was almost uni- versally believed that bank mergers would not be subject to section 1 of the Sherman Act. Congress flatly rejected these proposals of the Justice Department to make section '7 of the Clayton Act applicable to bank merg- ers. But, at the same time, Congress saw the need for legislation to establish clear and uniform standards governing bank mergers, and it saw the need to specify which agency of Government should have the final authority over bank mergers?the Justice Department or the three Federal bank supervisory authorities. The Bank Merger Act of 1960 was intended to answer both requirements. The act gave the final authority over bank mergers to the three bank Supervisory agencies?the Fed- eral Reserve System for State member banks, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for insured nonmember banks, and the Comptroller of the Currency for national banks. Under the legislation the banking agency having jurisdiction is required to request a report on the competitive aspects of a merger under consideration from the Justice Department. The agency having ju- risdiction is also required to request reports on competitive factors from the other two banking agencies. The competitive factor is then weighed along with such factors as the financial his- tory and condition of the banks involved, the adequacy of their capital structures, the general character of the banks' management, and the convenience and needs of the com- munity to be served. The agencies are re- quired to reject any merger application if, after giving full consideration to all such factors, they do not find the transaction to be in the public interest. In passing the Bank Merger Act, Congress decided that the public interest is best served by subjecting bank mergers to a balanced test of cempetition and protection of sound banking rather than to the single test of competition under the antitrust standards. I don't think the intent of Congress could have been stated more clearly than it was at the time the Bank Merger Act was passed. Senator FULBRIGHT, Democrat, of Arkansas, who was chairman of the Senate Banking and Currency Co.mmittee when the bill was brought to a vote on the floor of the Senate, said, "As it passed the Senate, S. 1062 (the Bank Merger Act) expressed the view of the Senate, for the third time, that bank mergers should be regulated by the Federal banking agencies on the basis of banking factors and the competitive factors, with no single factor being controlling. S. 1062 was a clear state- ment, for the third time, of the Senate's view that the provisions of section 7 of the Clayton Act should not apply to bank mergers." The Senator went on to point out that "the amendments to S. 1062 made by the House do not change this aspect of the bill. The House has agreed with the Senate that bank merg- ers should be controlled by the Federal bank- ing agencies on the basis of both banking factors and competitive factors, and that sec- tion 7 of the Clayton Act should continue to be inapplicable to bank mergers." The intent of the bill was also stated by tl;)e majority leafier of the Spate, Lyndon B. A rirtretlinri--=nr DnIcAnc-in. Inn-Ain-wan ? riA_DnDa7rtrinAAnDnarvgnnnRrannc_A- --- Approved For Release 20 CONGRESS' n, who inserted the following State- into the RECORD just before the bill d: bill establishes v.niforrn and clear aids, including both banking and corn- peti ire factors, for the coasideration of pro- po d bank mergers. It eliminates a number of , pa in the statutory framework, which no permit many bank mergers to occur with no evien by any Federal agency. It pro- vid s for a thorough review by the appro., pri to Federal bank supeevisory agency, un- der these comprehensive etandards, and with thej benefit of any information which may be su plied by the Department of Justice in the report required from them, of the bank merg.. ersi by asset acquisition and other means - ? Ch are now and will continue to be exempt trcm the antimerger provisions of section 7 of he Clayton Antitrust act." he majority leader added: "The repeated provements [in this hill] ? show the 1 merits, the real benefits of the legate- e process at its best." e intent of Congress in passing the uk Merger Act was very clear. Yet, in ne of 1965, following 2 years of litigation, e Supreme Court in ruling on a merger two banks in Philadephia which had been proved by the Comptroller of the Currency, Id the merger violated section 7 of the a3rton Act. Justice Harlan, who disagreed with the ajority, said, "I suspect that no one will e more surprised than the Government to nd that the Clayton Act carried the day for case in court. Th 3 result is, of course, at the Bank Merger Act is almost corn- letely nullified; its enactment turns out to eve been an exorbitant waste of eongres- ena![ time and energy. This frustration of Manifest congressic nal design is, in my law, a most unesarranted Intrusion upon the egishative domain." subsequently, the Supreme Court ruled bat two banks in Lexington, Hy., which had ? erged in accordance with the provisions of the Bank Merger Act Were in violation of the Sherman Act. 'Then in March 1965, a Fed- eral district cdurt in New York ruled that the Manufacturers Trast Co. and the Hanover Bank- violated both toe Clayton Act and the Sherman Act when they merged in 1961, after they had received the approval of the Federal Reserve Board. . On the baste of these enlings the Depart- ment Of Justiee could now challenge all of the More than 2,000 bank mergers which have been emesurtunated since the Clayton Act was amended in 1950. TUE PlIAPOSE OF S. 1698 Obvithisly, there is a clear need for the legislation that is now before this com- mittee. The ground rules governing bank Mergers must be reaffirmed and the dark clouds of cotifusior must be removed from the numerouS bank mergers that have been consummated in good faith under the law of the land. S. 1698 wottld Eerie both of these purposes. rt 'would plade bank Mergers virtually in the same categcrrk isa in .3rgers in other highly reg- ulated industries. er is n 6 ' p . question that the banking in- tias ry is eine -Of the Most tightly regulated industries in the Nation. Before a bank is Wen chartered, the banking agencies must be assured that sach a bank, if chartered, amid meet the ne ads and convenience of the Unity; The agencies must also deter- e that The bank, if chartered, will have asentinTS eliaticenef succeeding. A bank ot 'ennaterrible to other businesses and viewed differentlyby the public at large. en a -harik.'-fails, repercussions are felt tnroughoutnhe cceamunity. Last year, there -Were 18,50r business failures. This figure :About average. Yet when eight banks total' ttert6ellz 'amounting to eight one- Saintithanf 1 percent of an bank deposits 109/26 relA4RDP67B00446R0005000_ _80005-4 NAL RECORD ? SENATE Mail 2O1965 failed in 196e, It made headlines and led to a congressional investigation, with which, in- cidentally, we have indicated our full coop- eration. in short, a single bank failure is cause for benorn because of the 'human and economic pro! lams it creates for the com- munity. 'That is why entry into the banking business fe controlled. Once a 'cheater is granted to a bank, the bank beep:3meg subject to very strict regula- tions whibh prescribe the amount a bank may lend to :al individual or a corporation, how much it can pay in interest to attract deposits, llow much it must maintain in cash reserves, and 3, host of other limitations. In fact, regullations pervade the whole spectrum of bank ,opel ations. Through periodic ex- aminations, lank supervisory agencies make sure that th regulations are observed. By using these tools?regulation and ex- amination?bank supervisory authorities can control Competition in banking on a con- tinuing basis to make sure the system is sound and the public interest is protected. Mr. Chairman, the American. Bankers As- sociatiod en 'tends that the intimate work- ing knOwlectge of banking gained by the supervisors In their daily association with banks ie essential In regulating competition In banking. It is also our centention that this know-how is basic in considering the merits Or bank mergers. Therefore, we are in full Cups ort of S. 1698 which would place bank Mergers under the jurisdiction of the three Feclei al bank supervisory agencies. The austice Department would still play an advisory role in that the banking agency having jurisdiction would have to request a repott on the competitive aspects of any merger" miler consideration. The banking agency woald also have to request reports on conmentive factors from the other two banking agencies. But :the first provision of S. 1698 would give the Federal bank supervisory agencies the ft al authority over bank mergers, which was What Congress intended when it passed the Hank Merger Act in 1900. It would exemPt b tnk mergers from the provisions of thp Sherman Act and section 7 of the Claynen A a. Tku: ovzsriox OE trNMERCING BANKS The second provision of S. 1698 is designed to preveet the courts from ' breaking up mergers that were consummated under ap- propriate regulatory authority. Five merg- ers ate now in the courts. Over 2,000 others coul4 be challenged by the Department of Justice under the Supreme Court's Inter- pretation of the antitrust laws. "tImnerging" a bank after the two banks have operated as a single unit is night- marish c Yen in the abstract. The relation- ship, between a depositor or borrower said his tank is based on mutual confidence and trust. In many cases, corporations and in- dividuals select a particular bank because the : bark offers the exact combination of services needed. This is particularly true when trust services are involved. 14 a beak were to unmerge, internal work- ing; efficiency would he shattered. The CUB- tOTDST, who has not been given much con- sideration In this whole question, would then be race i with the decision of which one of the teen "u_nmerged" banks he would pa- tronize If the relationship is broken, the cuetorner may decide that he does not want to ;get his business mixed up in the un- screarntling process and select neither of th ten unmerged banks but a different bamk, and in all probability, a larger one. Zr this pattern of shifting to a larger bank in' lien of the unmerged banks prevailed, witat effect would this have on competition? Inateai of increasing competition, it is likely that nnraerging of banks would lead to an Inpreate in concentration In banking. This cannot be in the public interest. Few observers believe the Justice Depart- Ment would attempt to break up the 2,000- odd bank mergers that have taken place since 1950. It would certainly create chaos in the financial system. But here again the question is one of equity and fair play. Should the Justice Department question some mergers and not others when they were approved by the same Federal authorities under the same law? After all we boast loud and long about being a government of laws and not of men. The American Bankers Association strongly urges that all bank mergers which have been consummated, after receiving the approval of appropriate regulatory authorities, in- cluding those now being challenged in courts, be permitted to Starlit. CONCLUSION The executive council of the American Bankers Association, the ruling body of the association with members representing all divisions, sections, and committees of the ABA and all States in the Union, unani- mously supports S. 1698. I request per- mission to insert the resolution in the record of these hearings. Many State bankers as- sociations have taken similar action and indications are that others will do the same. Mr. Chairman, these actions by the ABA, which represents 98 percent of the Nation's commercial banks, plus the support coming from :State bankers associations, demonstrate without doubt that the banking industry favors this legislation.. In our judgment, the present state of con- fusion in the field of bank mergers must be eliminated so that bankers can get back to their main task?meeting fully and ef- ficiently the financial needs of the American economy. S. 1698 can clarify the whole sit- uation and I urge its prompt passage. Thank you very much. SUPPORT OF PRESIDENT JOHN- SON'S POLICIES ON SOUTHEAST ASIA Mr. McGEE. Mr. President, it is en- couraging to see large segments of the American press underscore the wide ac- ceptance and approval of our President's Policies in southeast Asia. It is encour- aging to see many newspapers spread the message which is so essential; name- ly, that the United States of America seeks peace, and is anxious to help the people of South Vietnam and all other peoples of southeast Asia, to raise their heads and their standard.sof living. Last Thursday, America's policies were again effectively enunciated by Presi- dent Johnson, who, in speaking to a na- tional television audience, gave the mes- sage that we will meet force with force, as we must, in order to restore peace and order, though we remain ever willing to take part in unconditional talks aimed at settlement of the war in southeast Asia. I - ask unanimous consent that edi- torials commenting on President John- son's speech, from the Cincinnati En- quirer, the Washington Evening Star, and the Washington Daily News, be printed in the Rscoac. There being no objection, the editorials were ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: iFrom the Cincinnati Enquirer, May 14, 19651 L.B.J. GOES TO THE PEOPLE President Johnson, in his televised speech on Thursday, was dueling with left-leaning intellectuals for support by the people of his policies in Vietnam. Mr. Johnson, harkening back to the days of Theodore nooseveit's big stick and soft A. .1AA?l/Atti.)&-. 71Mtlft A .1,&17141AAGAAAOAAAC A Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? SENATE sistea with an intensified effort to provide more assiStarree fer farmers, regardless of whether they happen to be Negro or white. In checking out the technical assistance effort, AFA's directors determined that about one-third of agricultural land in need Of treatment has received assistance, In many cases lands so ,assisted have been owned by knowledgeable educated people. The really big job with farmers less knowledgeable still lies ahead. With the better farmlands owned by the most knowledgeable farmers now able to serve as models for other less efortuna,te, now is obviously the time to move Ibrvicgd, not backward. - Contrary to prevailing thought in some areas?and this is partly due to an excess of zeal on the part of conservationists in over- selling their product?the soil, water, and foresVy job on millions of farm and other acres Will never be ended and it is time we started facing up to that fact. Changing ownership patterns are partly responsible. For instance, when a farmer with 300 acres buys the adjoining farm of 200 acres, a new management program and many adjust- ments are frequently required: Thus the ? best farmers require continuing assistance as wet as those less fortunate. But the big job ahead is with the less fortunate. AFA agrees with the views expressed by Marion S. Monk in his article, "The $20 Mil- lion Footnote," starting on page 24 of this issue. Mr. Monk lists five basic, reasons why the bureau of Budget proposal is a "bomb- shell" to con..servation: (1) It undermines confidence in ,the Government's conserva- tion purpose; (2) it would weaken loCal leadership; (3) it would break faith with State and local governments; (4) the re- volving fund proposed would treat land- owners unfairy by penalizing those least capable financially to move ahead; and (5) the proposal Would blunt and seriously slow down existing programs in which individual landowners are already paying the lion's share of the cost. AFA agrees with Mr. Monk. The Bureau of the Budget has been ill-advised in this case. At the same time conservation, in shoutdering part of the blame for this pro- posal, should start tempering its claims. The art ,of understatement as best exemplified by the late John F. Kennedy may yet prove to have been his greatest bequest to the American people. We all brag too much. We are all guilty of "Madisonavenuizing" our Conservation Sfforts. Without necessarily meaning to, we not infrequently give the Impression of having achieved total success when our efforts, in reality, are only well started. A case in point is forest growth. One questions the wisdom of headlining the fact that forest growth now exceeds forest drain without giving the same emphasis to the fact that our supply of larger trees and qual- ity timber is rapidly declining and that we may have to iinport wood in years to come. In a country this size with its immense geographical growth range there is no ex- cuse for the declining, quality of our trees or the fact that some species, such as quality walnut, may even face extinction unless we double our present efforts. Keeping the Kennedy gift for understate- ment in mind, it would seem this Nation is now mature enough to face reality without everlasting gilding the lily. We have not licked our forestry problems. We have not licked our soil erosion problems. We have not licked our wildlife problems. In all probability we will never completely lick the4 and we 'would be well advised to say W go e frequently. Too much success Must never be permitted to dull the cutting edge . of gradual arid never-ending conservation advance nor should people and particularly Government efficiais be lulled by success stories that should more appropriately be labeled "limited advance" at best. . , In our opinion, the "Bennett success story" in checking soil erosion and similar buildings were clearcut examples of too much glorifi- cation and too much mythma.king at the expense of too many acres yet to be saved. The proposal by a responsible agency of Gov- ernment to lop $20 million: off the technical aid effort bears out our point. Let conservationists always remember that the real glory of the conservation effort in America is not the unusual men who lead its programs or the banner headlines in the press but the application of conservation measures to the land by thousands of unsung professionals and technicians. Let us al- ways look to the land itself for the story of our modest successes and bitter failures. There we will 'find the stark truth, the real chronicle of conservation. At' CUNINDEPENDENCE DAY Mr. ALLOTT. Mr. President, it was just 63 years ago on this day that the flag of independent Cuba first waved over a free land and a proud people. Today, that land and that people are no longer free, independent, or proud. Instead, the descendants of the patriots who cheered when their flag was first raised in 1902, now find themselves wallowing in the morass of Communist domination. It is paradoxical, I think, that our Na- tion played such a significant role in paving the way for the free flag of Cuba to first fly and, at the same time, must assume a sizable share of the respon- sibility for the fact that that flag no longer flies over the homeland. Tragi- cally, by our failure at the Bay of Pigs, the people of this brave land must now suffer the heavy hand of a psychotic dic- tator who has dedicated himself to wip- ing out the concept of freedom, not only in Cuba, but also in the rest of Latin America. I can only commend President Johnson for the speed and decisiveness of his re- cent action in the Dominican Republic, for, without that kind of action, our Na- tion would undoubtedly by now be faced with another Communist regime in this hemisphere. It has been documented that 58 known Communists were origi- nally and openly associated with the re- bellion; and the program and policies projected by the original leadership fol- low a line dangerously similar to that used by Castro in 1959. In addition, the forces under the domination of this group were equipped to a large extent with Cuban arms. We can expect, I also believe, that other areas will become pawns in this ef- fort by the Communist bloc to try to dilute the effectiveness of our progres- sive escalation tactics in Vietnam. Al- ready it is reported that trouble spots are brewing in other Latin American coun- tries, again with Cuba as the immediate source of inspiration and arms, and with Moscow and Peiping in the background. There is every indication that our Na- tion has no intention of withdrawing any significant number of our troops from the Dominican Republic until we are assured that a democratic government is actually established there?a government of the people, as dedicated as we are to the idea that there will be no more Cubas in this hemisphere. On this policy, I also com- mend the President, for our purpose in this regard must not be diluted. While May 20, 1965 there May still be some immediate prob- lem among our Latin American friends about our action in the Dominican Re- public, I am still convinced that in the long nm such quick and positive action will reinstill in those neighbors the con- fidence they lost in our Nation when, by our indecisiveness in 1960, we allowed Cuba to become the invidious threat that it is today. In closing, I must repeat what I have said many times before: Simply wish- ing for it will not make Communist Cuba go away. Any attempt to sweep it under the rug will never succeed. It will continue to be a thorn in our side until we are prepared to take the necessary steps to stop it, because only we can sup- ply the leadership which is so necessary in order to coalesce the determination to sweep communism out of this hemi- sphere. In this connection, and for purposes of debate, I made suggestions, last year, on two different occasions, as to how we could go about this. Because the prob- lem of Cuba is now increasingly real, I challenge other Senators to pick up the banner with other suggestions and pro- posals. Only in this way can we hope to see Cuba returned to those who cherish freedom and who take pride in the flag that the United States placed in the hands of the people of Cuba in 1902. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I wish to join several other Senators on this particular day in commemorating the anniversary of Cuban independence. The Cuban people, who were granted their independence by the United States in 1902, continue in their struggle to overcome the many hardships that have been forced upon them in recent years. Since the duly elected Government, headed by Dr. Carlos Prios, gave way to the regime of Major General Batista, in the military coup of March 10, 1952, the Cuban people have suffered one series of heartaches and hardships after another. One year ago today, I stated that Cuba was an island of horror and a mere shell of what had existed prior to the Castro takeover. Today, that situation remains the same. Cuba is an island fortress whose communistic government has no interest in the welfare of its people, but is, instead, concerned only with increasing its authority over them and with subverting the governments of her sister nations in the Western Hemi- sphere. It is no longer necessary to document in detail the charges of Communist sub- version in Latin America emanating from Cuba. Those facts have been doc- umented time and time again by a num- ber of unimpeachable sources, such as the Organization of American States, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Preparedness Investigating Subcommit- tee of the Senate Committee on Armed Services, and many others. In fact, ac- cording to the May 24, 1965, edition of U.S. News & World Report, Communist terrorist activity is now being conducted in 12 of the 20 independent governments of Latin America. These nations are Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, and Venezuela. The fact that _ Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 May 20, .1965 Approved For Releas 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD -- SENATEIt) 6 6 rdii; talk, is ,attempting to prove to Communist a.ggressdrs that the United States will meet force Wth force, that armed conquest is futile 4d that aggression is not only wrong but will not work. Oppo ents of the President% policy are at- tempting to arouse public opposition to Mr. JOhnso 's Vietnam policy by marching, picketiag and demonstrating. The uquIrer, on Thursday morning, pub- lished cn page 1 a picture of an example of this. Ij was a photograph Cf some of the hunclre s who marched through Washing- ton We nesday, picketed the Pentagon and conferr d with Secretary of Defense Robert S. AlcN re. The group pleaded for negoti- ation, bombs, to settle tile war in Viet- nam. Anot er example, also a picture, was pub- lished the Enquirer on rauesday. This was the placard-picketing on Monday of the estate o Dr. Joseph Link in Mount Washing- ton whe Vice President HUMP KRET and some 300 De ocratic leaders were gathered there. Presi ? ent Zrohnson in his Thursday speech, repeat his call for unconditional discus- sions in quest of a settlement of the war but emphasized also that Red China, which is the agitator behind North Vietnam, is not in- terested. in a fulfillment of a desire by the Vietna ese for nationalism but in gaining f all of Asia. President renewed his pledge to or every possible path to peace and d again his interest I:a relieving the needs and improving the lot of the ese people in their struggle for control The search express human Vietna survival There is reason to fear, however well meanin some of those who march against ,Mr. Jo neon may be, that there may be Yalse u dercurrent of encouragement for their e orts because those eforts serve our calcula int foes rather than the United States. Retur ng again to "Teddy" Roosevelt, let us quot : "Far etter it is to dare mighty things, Lto win glorious triumphs, even though those p or spirits who neither enjoy much d by failure, than to take rank with leor S jar much, because thsy live in the gray t light that knows not victory nor defeat." Negotiation, unless it is backed by ower, trength, and resolve, is only a show f wea - 'ess to a powerful and predatory nemy ower. In that context it is in the "gray t light," to use the first President Rooseve t's words. Presi ent johnson, we conclude anew from his Th reday remarks, is trying to be a strong esident who directs the course of events, ather than allowing them to direct ini, in the interests of the safety of the people ?f this Nation. We believe he is right an ? we recommend that the people give to him heir booking rather than give it to }those o ,would have us lead from weak- ness rat er than strength. ? [Prom t e Washington Evening Star, May 14, 1965] AR EFFECTIVE AFFIAL There are those who -Mina , and perhaps rightly 0, that the President is making too many s ? eeches in his attempt to explain, de- fend, a ? justify his policies in Vietnam. To some, t e personality image which emerges from t television screen is not appealing. In our opinion, however, his televised ad- dress to1 the editorial cartooniats, in terms of content was effective. Mr. J hnsch began by saying again, with- out any qualification, that we will not aban- don ourl commitment to Sout.a Vietnam. It is desir ble to plant this firmly in the minds of the e emy. He also restated his readiness to enter into unconditional diecussions for a No. 91 3 settlement of Le war. This, too, needs to be stamped inde bly upon the consciousness of friend and fo alike. Most 1mpre4sIvs, however, was the Presi- dent's enume teal of the material Improve- ments which avc been made since 1954 in South Vietnaaa under what he correctly de- scribed as "c cur 'stances of staggering ad- versity." Mr. Johnsoxi spelled them out in this fash- ion: In South, Vietnam, always the rice bowl of Asia, rice pioduation has been doubled. A new variety ot sweetpotato has been intro- duced, promis ng .e sixfold yield. Corn out- put should ri e from 25,000 tons in 1962 to 100,000 tons y :966. Pig production has more than doiblezt since 1955. 6 million In South Viill are 200 doctors for 1tnarn, where life expectancy is 35 years, the people. In the United States there are 5,000 doctors for an eouivalent number. So we are helping tea build a medical school which will graduate 200 South Vietnamese doctors each year. 'tree than 12,000 hamlet health stations have ere built and stocked. More than 7 million peaple have been vaccinated against cha and millions more against other disease.There has also been much public education. To cite but one llustration, elementary school progress in thr area of enrollment haf risen from 300,000 in 1955 to more than 1,500,000 today. And, on the business front a cauntry which was virtually without indusitry :2 years ago now has more than 700 new pr rehabilitated factories. And all of this wo k has gone on and will go on despite the costly, cruel war and the :-..erroris- tic tactics of the Vietcong. This may not le especially impressive in rich, overfed lamer:lea. But as the message gets through, its import will not be lost upon millions of Psalms who are reared in ig- norance, rack d by disease and whose lives 1. are apent on he razor's edge of starvation. To them, the efeience to corn and pigs will not be a jok g .natter. The President aoncluded by saying that when peace final) y comes we are ready to. share this effort and this progress "with all the people of Viatnam?North and. South alike." This was an appropriate note to strike. One niust hope it is a note that will be heard in and. [Prom the W4shington Daily News, May 14, 1965] L.B.J. Moms His CASE ELOQUENTLY President JOhnsan never has done a more persuasive jola on an issue than he did Thursday in his TV appearance to detail again the wilts a ad hows of United States policy in Viet am Some seem to think the President is mak- ing these repented enunications of our pur- pose in Vieti am because a few vociferous i professors an others keep ragging him on the subject. .B.J, isn't going to reverse this particular brand of nonthInking?but ad- dresses such eis Taursday's can do a lot to solidify national understanding. Moreover, this r uts it up to the Commu- nists once m e. They show no more sign of relenting than the college hecklers. But there are othar people in the world who do have open miricis. Our policy, the ray Mr. Johnson stated it Thursday, is positive, not merely defensive. Our preferrtd rriority is on helping the South Vietnamese (and others in southeast Asia) to imprOve their lot. Since 1954, for Instance, rice procuction has been doubled, new crops intacdu fed, industrial production developed. Tilts ill would be much more meaningful, arSd ferther along, except for the Communists isho murder and pillage and force the Vietleamese and the United States to concentrate on military defense. Americans wouid much rather devote some of their resources to helping others with their economy and their standard of living. Our heavy expenditures on weapons are not by choice, but through necessity. All the same, the President is still willing to sit down and talk it out. The North Vietnamese obviously are hard to convince. Probably bemuse for so many of the years this war has been going on they have been getting off easy, giving them the idea the United States was merely a "paper tiger" and that eventually they could over- whelm the South Vietnamese. The President's purpose is to disabuse them of both notions?meanwhile being ready to negotiate and even readier to get on with peaceful ways to better life in southeast Asia, a program which would be far more useful to us and to the Asians than fighting. There is nothing new or strange in this double-edged policy. This is what we did during and after World War II. We Went all out to win and when the military job was finished we turned an enormous share of our effort and resources toward peaceful development around the world. PROPOSED CUT IN SOIL CONSERVA- .TION SERVICE APPROPRIATIONS UNWISE Mr. McGEE. Mr. President, in the April issue of American Forests maga- zine there is an editorial which I wish to bring to the attention of the Senate. The editorial, entitled "Budget's `Bomb- shell,' "is in opposition to the $20 million proposed cut in the appropriations for the Soil Conservation Service. I ask unanimous consent that the edi- torial be printed in the RECORD. There being. no objection, the editorial was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: BUDGET'S "BOMBSHELL" The Bureau of the Budget has not shown good judgment in cutting the technical as- sistance program of the Soil Conservation Service by $20 million. Hearings should be calledto give the conservation public an op- portunity to be heard on a proposal that would impede the forward advance of an old line and fundamental conservation program If allowed to stand. The proposal should be defeated and, in the not of recent devel- opments, more technical assistance provided for. At a time when new conservatio:n pro- posals are being heard retarding beautifica- tion of America great care must be taken to see to it that basic programs are not dam- aged in the process. There are reasons galore: why this cut is unwise at this particular time. With new dust storms billowing up in the West this is obviously no time to cut back on the never-ending task of anchoring soil in place. As this magazine has pointed out on more than one occasion many western acres are in a deplorable condition and need help. While recent efforts by a variety of hard-hit- ting agencies are hopeful signs, this task of land stabilization has to be an across-the- board effort and the Soil Conservation Serv- ice program is a basic part of that effort. A consistent conservation posture on the part of the administratio:a is most i.mpor- tant. When an impartial study group re- cently informed the administration that Negro farmers are getting the short end of the stick on agricultural aid efforts and that something should be done about it, the ad- ministration immediately concurred. Some- thing certainly should be done, but a pro- posal to lop off $20 million from the techni- cal aid program would not appear to be con- Approved For Releas 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-R1DF'67B00446R000500080005-4 .165 CONGRESStONAt RECORD ? SENATE 10667 much of the suppbrt, for that Communist -terrorist activity ConieS directly from Cuba has been proven time and again. As recently as 2 days ago, Fidel Castro was bragging of Cuba's power in this regard. Tn a broadcast address at the graduation ceremonies at Cuba's military academy, Castro said: Cuba is now a bogey Mal for the United States. They don't despise Cuba any more; on the contrary, Cuba now inspires in them 'respect and fear. These remarks were directed specifi- cally at the recent U.S. involvement in the Dominican- Republic situation, and clearly indicate the Castro attitude to- ward the achievement of peace and sta- bility in this hemisphere. In the past, we have been told, that communism in Cuba does not present a real danger to the United States, but is, rather, a distasteful nuisance which we must simply accept. The history of sub- version and unrest created in other Latin American countries by Castro- trained agents has repeated refuted this argument. Little has been said, how- ever, of subversive activitieson the part of the same agents within the United States itself. Now the veil on this topic seems to be lifted: The American Se- curity Council has just published the first part of a two-part Series on Castro's sub- version in the United States. This study - discusses the methods of infiltration, the activities,' the scope of the Communist effort, and the successes and failures of the operation to 'date. In order that this excellent report may be read by all Sen- ators, I request unanimous consent that it be printed in the RECORD at this point in my reMarks. There being no objection, the report was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: ciAsrRo's SUBVERSION IN THE UNITED STATES? PART I British historian and philosopher, Arnold rroynbee, before giving a lecture at the State Department on April 16, 1965, was quoted as saying: "It's hard to understand why you make such a fuss about Castro." And then comparing the United States and Cuba to an elephant and a Mouse, he quipped, "Ws great fun for the mouse." Just a week previous to these comments, a CIA report on Cuban subversion was sub- mitted to the House Subcommittee on Inter- American Affairs (Selden committee). The report stated in part that "the Castro regime lute in operation (since 1961) a highly pro- fessional espionage and subversion agencY, the General Directorate of Intelligence (DGI). The DGI is advised by at least five Soviet intelligence specialists. Moreover, one of the purposes of the highly secret meetings of Latin American leaders in Havana last November was to give added impetus to more militant Communist activity in the hemi- sphere" (WR 65-9). Castro's DOI is divided into three units, the largest of which masterminds the train- ing, financing and promoting of subversion, and, guerrilla warfare in Central and South American countries', Though the CIA report spelled out in detail the degree of the DGI's activities in these areas, it made no mention efforts in tbeUnited States. Our own irkvestigation attempts in some measure to all the ga'p. Dd*Lrn-xops OF INFTLkrTRATION There are tWo known major points of en- try by which covert Castro agents Infiltrate into the 'United States, One is by fishing boat to l'inerto Rico, and then by illegally entering the United States with falsified documents. Congressman WILLIAM CRAMER, Republican, of Florida, in testifying before the Senate Subcommittee on Internal Se- curity as far back as 2 years ago, said that "in excess of 1,000 people have come through this route into the United States as Puerto Rican citizens with falsified passports." The other method of infiltration is by boat or plane to Mexico. There the Mexican Com- munist Party supplies the proper papers and the agent crosses the border at Laredo, Juarez, or Tijuana. Infiltrators from Cuba who enter the United States using either one of these routes, or via Canada, masking their identities by whatever manner, are trained agents whose assignments cover the Marxian spectrum of subversive activities. INDICATION OF ACTIVITIES On the night of November 16, 1962, the FBI raided a workshop on West 27th Street in New York City. There they seized a secret cache of weapons and explosives which included delayed action incendiary bombs. They also arrested three Castro agents and Roberto Santiesteban Casanova, a newly ar- rived attache to the Cuban Mission at the U.N. Two other members of the Cuban Mission, Jose Gomez Abad and his wife, Elsa, were named as fellow conspirators. The purpose of the weapons and the ex- plosives was "for the sabotaging of defense Installations and the demoralization of the civilian population." Attorney General Robert Kennedy said the plan was "aimed at the heart of the internal security of the United States of America." Four days later, immigration officers in Brownsville, Tex., reported that Mexican authorities had prevented the blowing up of the International Bridge between Browns- ville and Matamoros, Mexico. In doing so, they also nipped in the bud a sabotage plan to destroy major buildings in Matamoros. Two of these apprehended were Castro agents. Since 1962, there have been several allied cases, one taking place in October, 1964, in which a . bomb was exploded in the Ever- glades Hotel in Miami injuring a number of Cuban exiles attending a meeting. Some . months later, a Cuban-terrorist threat to bomb the Roney Plaza Hotel in Miami intimidated the management into cancelling a meeting of this same exile organization. This threat came on the same day the the bomb plot to blow up the Washing- ton Monument, the Statue of Liberty and the Liberty Bell was discovered. On the surface, this latter episode ap- peared to be the wild act of a quartet of misguided idiots. But there is sound reason to believe that wild as the attempt was, the four would-be saboteurs were acting under DGI instructions. Leader of the bomb plot, Robert S. Collier, had traveled illegally to Cuba in the summer of 1964. Upon his return, he formed with a number of fellow Cuban travelers a pro-Castro, pro-Peking group which called itself the Black Libera- tion Front. In December, 1964, a United Nations party was given by the Cuban dele- gation in honor of its visiting guerrilla ex- pert, Ernesto Che Guevara. At this party, Collier was introduced to Michelle Duclos, member of an extremist separatist organ- ization in Quebec. Later, the plotters bought the dynamite in Canada and it was Miss Duclos who transported the explosives to New York in her car. These five incidents fall under the head- -Mg of terror tactics. That only one of ,them met with any real degree of success speaks well for the FBI and our law enforcement agencies. However, FBI Director J. Edgar ?Hoover, pointed out in testimony before the House Subcommittee on Appropriations last year that the efforts of the Castro regime to infiltrate intelligence agents into the United States' "show' that we (FSI) must maintain a broad coverage in this area of our opera- tions." How broad a coverage can be glimpsed by these additional incidents. In early 1963, a Castro agent was apprehended in a New York City apartment possessing a suitcase filled with visa applications and other documents which would aid fellow agents to gain illegal entry into the United States. From Caracas, Venezuela, in February of this year came news of another type of smuggling operation which again pointed to- ward the activities of U.S.-based Castro agents. By accident, on board the U.S.S. Santa Rosa were found 1,000 mail pouches filled with pro-Castro literature. The litera- ture had been printed in and shipped from Miami, Fla. Just as Puerto Rico has served as an im- portant way station for Castro agents to en- ter the United States, it has also served as a transit point for still another sort of smug- gling?that of narcotic drugs. In December 1964 three Castro agents were arrested at Miami Airport?one of them a Cuban, Mario Carabeo Nerey. Treasury offi- cials in Puerto Rico said Ce,rabeo Nerey was engaged in drug traffic. How large the traffic is can be measured by the fact that between January and November 1964, narcotics agents seized 697 pounds of drugs being smuggled into the United States from Cuba. This was an increase of over 450 pounds seized during the previous year. Included in this amount was heroin, shipped to Cuba from Red China. In January 1965, a New York police in- spector, Ira Bluth, was quoted as saying: "Marihuana used to come to New York almost entirely from Mexico, but recently large amounts of the drug have been discOvered coming from Cuba." On January 15, 1965, Oscar H. Reguera and Elidoro Martinez were taken into custody in a New York motel with $3 million worth of cocaine in their luggage. Martinez is be- lieved to be a Castro agent. Aside from the obvious harmful effects addiction to these drugs creates, the major purpose behind the smuggling of narcotics into the United States by Castro agents is to raise money to finance an insurrection in Puerto Rico. Castro's DGI is working in concert with Puerto Rican Communists and miliant splinter factions of the Puerto Rican in- dependence movement, accelerating their at- tacks against the social and governmental structure of the island. Since 1961, a num- ber of Castro-supplied arms caches have been uncovered. Gun battles have been fought between the police and insurrectionists, and Castro agents have infiltrated both exile and student groups, their purpose to stimulate the kind of rioting which would require armed intervention. Should this happen, the cry for independence, which 97 percent of the Puerto Rican electorate rejected in the November 1964 elections, would take on a more critical meaning. This is so because the strategy of the movement is tied di- rectly to the November 20, 1964 vote of the United Nations Committee on Anticolonial- ism. The Committee voted 17-6, in direct violation of a 1963 General Assembly ruling, to place the demand for Puerto Rican inde- pendence on the U.N. agenda (WR 65-4). This act played directly into the hands of Castro's DGI and Puerto Rican extremists?. two of whom are presently members of the Cuban U.N. mission. When the General Assembly convenes again, there is little doubt that agitation and propaganda will be stepped up in New York and San Juan, with the possibility of more violent actions erupting in Puerto Rico. SCOPE OF THE EFFORT Recently, the Puerto Rican newspaper El Mundo estimated that since 1960, 12,000 Americans and Puerto Ricans have received subversive training in Cuba. Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67800446R000500080005-4 1 668 Approved For Releasel 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD --- SFNATE May 2: , 9654 e cannot attest to the accuracy of the fig res nor can we say how many of that n mber are under the orders of the Cuban Di ectorate of Intelligence. Although we do Xic1t have Castro-trained guerrillas operating in our country as a number of the Latin erican countries presently do, we can say th t intelligence and law enforcement agen- eMs here and in Puerto Rico take the efforts of the DGI most seriously. selii edf circt,utrhseis, trhepeeprtubeelinclyenklynogwivne ceanseisndoiuete: ti n of what is afoot. Boary historians such as Toynbee may look down up the world and vi w it from the vantags point of centuries. II ortunately, we who have to live in the w Id from day to day and face its reality cannot afford cute analogies of mice and e hants with regard to Castro and our- Tea.a part II of "Castro's Subversioil in the I.7 ited States" we will show how Castro's edema supporters, by using the techni- qu of agitation and propaganda; by form- in front groups; by infiltrating the civil ^ ts movement; and b f attacking our for- el :n policy are winning important victories in hat can best be tensed the psychological ho war. r. DOMINICK. Mr. President, over th last 2 or 3 years, many concrete and co tructive proposals in this field have be n made by Members of both Houses of Congress. Unfortunately, the John- so and Kennedy administrations have ch sen to ignore them completely. This Is i ost unfortunate, ,for the simple fact Is that the longer WE procrastinate in es ablishing a specific policy to eliminate co ? unism from this: hemisphere, the in re difficult it will be to bring about su h an accomplishment. ne year ago, I sta;ed that the time W:. coining very quickly when we would be forced to take more positive action th had theretofore been the case, or els we must stop talking about the pres- e ation of freedom and liberty. In re- ce t weeks, our Government has seen fit to take firm and resc lute steps in the Do can Republic, and in this action h received strong Eupport from the ov rwhelmin.g majority of the American pe i ple and their elected Representatives. T s action is, at best, only a stopgap me sure, however, for the preservation of reedom in the Dominican Republic, an in itself will have little effect upon th Cuban Communist Government. he need still exists and grows more ur ent each passing day, for this ad- istration to develor a positive policy wit regard to the Castro government, to nform the American people of that pol cy, and to move resolutely to imple- me t it. We have committed our young me , our national prestige, and our rnili- tar and economic might to the pres- erv tion of liberty in Asia. Just recently, we have shown a willingness to prevent the establishment of a second revolu- tioary Communist government in Latin Am rico,. These are positive steps. Now let us :follow through and assert our lea4lersiiip in the development and aug- melitation of a policy not only to stop thel growth of communism in the West- ern Hemisphere, but a so to reestablish thr ughout this hemisphere the right of self determination. T1 .e administration will have my support, as I am certain it will have the wholehearted support of all ther Members of Congress, in any such posithe action it undertakes to re- instate freedom and independence to the long-suffering Cubans. WHY MUST THE TAXPAYER SIMS MIZE IMMORALITY? Mr. 13YE,D of West Virginia. Mr. President, an interesting article appeared in the April 1965 issue of the Reader's Digest entitled "Why Must the Taxpayer Subsidi Immorality?" The article was written by Mrs. Juanita Kidd Stout, the first elected Negro woman judge in the United States. I ask unanimous consent,tha t this informative, thought- provoking, Etnd challenging article be in- cluded in toe RECORD at this point. There: benig no objection, the article was orciered to be printed in the REC- ORD, as frillow,s: [From the Feader's Digest, April 1965 con- densed' from Philadelphia Sunday Bulletin magazine] Wuxi MG ST THE TAXPAYER SUBSIDIZE IMMORALITY? ; (Br Juanita Kidd Stout) During the years I have been a. judge in the Philadelphia County Court, I have learned a great deal a bout people on relief and about the people who hand out their checks. Fre- quently ! have been outraged by both. Last y ar there appeared before our court a child oi 13 years who shortly was to be de- livered o(f a baby fathered by her uncle. For at least 13 years her family had been on relief?wIth f succession of men fathering a successiori of children. The gul's 14-year- old sister; hac produced an illegitimate baby at ?13; anothcr older sister had borne an il- legitima4 ch: Id at 14. But ndthing had been done by welfare workers to t sire these girls, their brothers and sisters farm their depraved home. In fact, oneicastworker had filed a written re- port with: the court stating that the mother was providing a "fairly adequate home" for her sevenchildren. On En:lithe' occasion, a young man was brought before me on a charge of not sup- porting the child he had sired iout of wed- lock?nor' was he contributing anything to the support cf his own wife's five children. He had not aeld a steady job in 10 years and had bees on and off the relief rolls._ I asked hisicasoworker if anyone had insisted that this ,hea thy man find work. The an- swer was, !It 13 not our Job to inast." I said, "This man has completed 11th grade. lie s neither stupid nor inca- pacitated In the last 10 years a great deal of grass has grown, a good many snows have fallen. Has r.o one directed him to a lawn mower, a 'now shovel?" The caseworker said no. I then told the young man that if he failed to get a jnb in 2 weeks, or to prove that he had tried ;to gst work by visiting 25 places of potential employment, he was going to jail. Four days later he reported back. He had a Job. In anotper -:ase, a man brought before my court on the charge of falling to support three illegitimate children told me he had been "pertnitt rd" by a relief worker to set up a househdld with another woman. I didn't believe hiln, but investigation proved he was telling thd tru.th. The map wiz a part-time chauffeur and a partial relief recipient. Both women in- volved wive receiving grants. When I called on the caeewc rkers of the man's two para- mours for testimony, I learned that they in- deed had knowledge of the situation. Not only that, buil a supplementary grant had been approved for paramour No. 2, reimburs- ing her f In "household money" she Approved For Releas had used as bail to retrieve her lover from behind bars. This shocks my conscience?moral as well as financial. The tragedy of relief is that it takes away from people the drive to work. When a per- son is capable of earning only $45 a week, he may be all too willing to accept $45 from public assistance for doing nothing. I have the deepest sympathy for the good mother struggling to bring up her children on a wel- fare grant, and for the father who wants but cannot rand work. 13ut I deplore a system that regards the handling out of checks as its prime function, that subsidizes the lazy and immoral home with the taxpayer's dollar. Teenage boys have appeared before me on charges of delinquency, and I have asked them what their fathers did for a living. Their answer: "We get a check from -the State." I get a check from the Government, too. But there is one big difference; I work for mine. Too many youngsters in welfare-sup- ported families never learn the value, the joy, the necessity of work?seeing, as they do, their fathers lying in bed until 10 in the morning, and hearttg the family finances discussed only in terms of "waiting until the check comes in." Many social workers contend that the pur- pose of welfare is to keep families together. In my opinion, a good institutional home would be far better for the growth and de- velopment of children than an u:nfit private home where a child sees promiscuity, crime and vice, where the welfare check is used lor everything but the child's support. It is my suggestion that we provide dormi- tory facilities for these pitiful children, espe- cially in the urban areas where the need is most, acute, and that the public-assistance law be amended to :provide grants for the children's support during the period of dormitory living. ? There our deprived youngsters would get. the benefit of the tax- payer's dollar. They could be supervised in their studies and recreation. From there they could attend local schools. Each would have a clean bed, a warm meal and a light to read by?things niany of them have never known. In the end, such a plan probably would be less expensive than our present system--or lack of system. Social workers object to institutional care "because youngsters need mother love." They should sit in court with me and hear, day after day, the stories of some of that _ love: no genuine affection, no supervision, no conversation?nothing but a succession of "boarder" men. There might be less need for special facili- ties if more of those involved in administer- ing relief programs were concerned with seeing that a child has a decent upbringing. Certainly, welfare workers have heavy case- loads. But no achievement of substance comes easily, and the result of the extra effort can be inspiring, especially when you are dealing with human lives. A few years ago five young girls involved in the slashing of another youngster in school were brought before me on a charge Of delinquency. Some were from homes-sup- ported by welfare grants. None had had any previous contacts with the court. I decided on an experiment: I made each write an essay on the meaning of being a lady; each was told that she must volunteer 100 hours of work in a hospital, a library or a home for the aged. And each must make a proper skirt, not tight and short like those they had worn in court. These girls did not only everything the court assigned--but more. They learned the Joy of work and of doing for others. They kept corning back even after I had released them from probation, and continually asked me: "What can we do next, Judge Stout?" None has been in trouble since. Two are now 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 cONGRE5SIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX pr pr I4r., WUerd Wirtz, after a 4.-day tbur 90 Ca1lfopia -4414...Areali, Said; 'There W _ _90 Po. ,reilAtv ft .ittiil of. Vnbile Law 78 ,unger? Val= Me49474 riatiP11418 were im- ported to the Vrilted,,States to work in the fields' Ir WirtZ xleo said .that increased labor ,yeets.'?w01,111:1 .?hAve..tq be asSnMed by tileci9P?W23M.?. "Also, Ur. Vil,rtz 'says that since we have , . 500,9.00 unemployed workers in .California we r ehoUld not import any foreign labor. That ?sounds lqgical, but I believe that he ,overlooked the fact that few Americans will 4worg ;for $1.25 an hour, which for forty toUrsrWould arnouht to $50 per week, from Which, there .would be payroll deductions, rialUely Federal withholdings, social security, California unemployment insurance, and Accident insural}ce, Also, a worker may live frOm 5 to 50 Miles from the farm and need gas and oil to COrnrnute, so he may not clear More than $40 per week. However, if he goes once a Week to the Unemployment office he May collect a $55 check, with no deductions, And go home and do no work. ? 'We note that Mr. Albert Tieburg, director Of California Agricultural Employment, re- cently said that we neecled ,8,700 workers iraraetllately in the Stockton, Salinas, and Coachella Valley areas, At the February Meeting' of Mendocino Pomona Grange it was reported that at Oxnard they had rounded Up 500 fellows to pick lemons starting on a Monday, and by Saturday they had? only 17 or 18 left, and these were too old to go up ladders to pick lei/Ions, so the lemons will be rotting on the ground, and the prices will go Up. We recently heard on the radio.that in Stockfon area h,ey rounded up over 800 workers to pick _asparagus, and by the third day they had about 00 left. . - "We know, thkt tke,,planting and harvest- ing of vegetables must be done at the right time of the yeari_also the fruit from orchards Must be picked at the right time or it will Veil, and therekore it will not wait for our Congress and the rest of _the Government to be just talkingabout Public Law 78 that has been Abolished, or the 'green card' to braCeros, and. the rest of the theories and , techniealities. ' "We _have laearcl tiIat because of the un- dertair4 of harvesting, a few of our can- neries .XS,Ve.?4:Aa4i ITIOVSCI to Mexico, and More Will be moving, because they are sure of abuM.19.4t prO,ducts and labor there, so in another. 2 or .a years th,e million and a half of cannery and _processing Workers will be out of jobs, and. California will have two or three times more unemployed collecting $55 per week, and ,pur 15 billion agricultural industry will have gone to the dogs, and Uncle Sam will ;lave lost the cannery and processing companies' .income tax, and the workers' income tax, while Mexico will be gaining these taxes. Also, the farmers won't have to, pay the State the 884 million that they ,paid last year to the State, for unem- plOyment, benefits, but still the State will have many more unemployed people to sup- "Having been for many years in our mer- chant marine service, I remember that as , back as 1918 .our ,California dried fruits, S.:4.1011 prunes, apricots, pears and peaches4? anclNiV:allaUts and .almonds were .be- Trig. exp-Orted to ,,NOZth European countries in Many tiiousandg,.,-!DT ,tCgiSp, RDA If.Ave. .are nOvinet" to have?Anybody to do the harvest- ing of such crops the loss of this export P_VIsineqe.wll be a, serious ,blow to our entire ag.ricultural economy. Also, we should be cciiikdering our canning industry, which is very large at. present in our State, and the froen fruit and vegetable industry. "We do not, ICLLQW Or any machine that can 'Aap asparagus, celery, Swiss chard, peas, ripe :tonlatoes?, strawberries, cherries, plums, apirlaots,,peaches, pears, and many more frUits, gnd vegetables. They must be han- dled by loving hands, since a machine does not know if a pea pod has anything inside, or if strawberries are red or green. "Under such conditions of having no man- ual workers to do our planting and harvest- ing of agricultural products, the farmers will have no choice but to go into other fields, such as raising cows or sheep or cot- ton. Then the fruit and vegetable stands and canned goods shelves will have a very sickly appearance, and prices will be two or three times higher, and our incomes or social security checks won't be any bigger. In a couple of months or less the strawberries will be nice and ripe, and with no one to pick them and bring them to our stores strawberry shortcake will be, past history. "We know that Mexico permits big Ameri- can capital and many, many thousands of Americans to work and do big business in Mexico, especially in the line of gas and oil for our cars, so if Mexico permits Americans to do busines and work there why cannot America permit temporary Mexican workers to come over and harvest our products (which we won't do for ourselves), in order to keep our bay windows up in good shape? Suppose the Mexican Government retaliated by saying: 'If you don't want us in your country, we don't want you in ours; pack up and go home.' Mexico is not going to say 'Pack up and go home.' On the contrary, at present as in the past, Mexico encourages with open arms foreign industries to come in, and they accord any privileges and facili- ties possible, as we already know quite well. We have read that in 1963 we imported 242 million pounds of tomatoes from Mexico, and this year our farmers are having difficulty borrowing any money from banks for tomato' planting, because of the uncertainty of har- vesting. "It is interesting to notice that our Secre- tary of Agriculture does not seem to have made a peep concerning the situation. Does he not have jurisdiction? "We should all write to our Representa- tives in Washington and the Secretaries of Labor and Agriculture." We earnestly urge that you do all possible to help California avoid the disaster which may result from failure to plant and har- vest the crops which her people, and in- deed the peoples of the Nation and of the world, have come to expect. Respectfully yours, PHYLLIS S. JIMENES, Mrs. F. A. JIMENES, Secretary. SALINAS, CALIF., May 11, 1965. Hon. DON CLAUSEN, House of Representatives, House Office Building, Washington. D.C.: Today, more than 20,000 crates of straw- berries will be added to those already rotting on the plants in our fields. Continual daily losses building to 40,000 crates per day this time next week are anticipated if we are uhable to pick. Translated to market value using combination fresh and freezer prices on last year's market prices at least $50,000 per day loss. It is clearly and abun- dantly evident insufficient numbers of do- mestic workers available for strawberry har- vest and cultural practices. Today, our needs are for an additional 2,000 workers and by the middle of next week an additional 1,500 re- quired. This company has met all items of criteria for becoming eligible for supple- mental foreign labor and certified for workers, however no help other than 200 plus Japanese and Filipino nationals yet. Further documentation of losses to be devel- oped by Agricultural Extension Service, Uni- versity of California and forwarded separate cover. Any assistance you are able to pro- vide greatly appreciated. SALINAS STRAWBERRIES, Tom MOABIARA. May 13, 1965 Shadow of Cuba EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. JOHN M. MURPHY OF NEW YORIC IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday, May 12, 1965 Mr. MURPHY of New York. Mr. Speaker, under leave to extend my remarks in the RECORD, I want to call to the attention of my colleagues the out- standing editorial on American action in the Dominican Republic by the renowned writer, Max Lerner. This article ap- peared in the New York Post of May 3, 1965. I concur completely in Mr. Lerner's remarks and hope that other editorialists speak out as forthrightly as he has. [From the New York Post, May 3, 1965] SHADOW or CUBA (By Max Lehner) A friend of mine, who knows Latin America better than I do, says it will be a long, hot summer in the Caribbean. Certainly what has happened in Santo Domingo, turning a lovely city into a charnel house, suggests that there are volcanic political passions in the area. The bloodshed wears the aspect not only of a rebellion but of a civil war, with longstanding hatreds coming into play and old accounts being settled. In this jungle of passions, anti-American hatreds emerged very early in the rebellion. President Johnson had to act swiftly to get American civilians out. But most political decisions have plural, not single, motives. Having entered the Dominican Republic to save lives, the American troops have stayed to prevent anarchy, seal off the chances of a Communist takeover, and await the begin- nings of a new frame of political order. One's first impulse is to say that this was a monstrous blunder, awakening long muted memories of marine landings and gunboat diplomacy, and feeding the Castro image of American imperialism. Yet one cannot stop there, without raising a haunting question: What was the alternative for President John- son? Was it to appeal to the OAS? There would be days and days before any practical action; and if the revolt did indeed contain, as a second-stage effect, the design for a Communist takeover, the OAS action would have come far too late. Or was the alterna- tive simply to stay out, or to get out again immediately after the first evacuation of Americans, and let events take their course? It isn't enough to point out in a holier- than-they way what must have been obvious enough to Johnson, Rusk, Bundy and Tom Mann?that the decision was a dangerous one. But was there any alternative that would have been any less dangerous? Run- ning a country isn't a question of making choices between the beautiful decisions and the damned ones. It is often an impossible choice between a blind alley and a somewhat less blind one, and a President is lucky, even as he enters a dark tunnel, that he can see a thin shaft of light at the far end. The whole decision in the Dominican oper- ation, as it transpired in the minds of the President and his advisers, was made in the shadow of Cuba. It is easy to say that the shadow shouldn't have been there?but it was. Too much blood has been spilt in Cuba, too many lives have been blasted there, too much heartbreak and frustration and re- morse have been felt in Washington to leave the slate blank. The pro-Bosch leaders now say that the Communist elements in the revolt are not many, and that the irresponsible ones got - , Ali-proved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B404MR000500080005-4 Approved For Releas Mcty 13, .1965 CONGRESSIONA dindidatel not given too muc'a chance of election, , Mr. Fi'?Iltree Won handily, however, and ()tiered Mr. Caffrey the job as 3ongraesiona1 secretaryit Mr. Caffrey accepted and moved tO the Vir shington. area where he had since r maimed helping direct the csreera of Mr. erce, 1).ki. Minoru, and Representative CENNTEN. ' ? Mr. C ffrey married the former Marian Henning, of Clyde, N.Y. ' Mr. C ffrey's success on behalf of the Repfesen atives he worked for likely was his quick reponse to constituents with prob- lems. H s tenacity and ability to follow through on appeals for congresSiona1 help also helged him attain the respect of his employe and the constituency as well. ' NominVly, Mr. Caffrey was inlet and re- tiring. e worked hard and long hours. in 1962 lim was seriously ill with pneumonia and was hospitalized for some time. He re- Covered lowly from the illness. [From t e Watertown (N.Y.) Times, May 11, 1965] anoson ,CAFFREY RITES PLANNED--FUNERAL FOR CONGRESSIONAL Am To BE WEDNESDAY IN A5INOTON, VA. Mr. Caifrey, whose career spanned the White 'ouse tenure Of four Presidents,. served a. chief aid to Representatives Wal- lace E. Pierce, Clarence E. Kilburn, and ROBERT 41. MctWEN, all of wham represented northenz New York communities. His 25 rears of JCapitol Hill service ramie him about the dea4 of legislative assistants and he was extreme y popular with congressional offices iregardle a of political affiliation. ' Hisg1cat familiarity with committee staff and keY officials of the executive agencies !enabled him to keep several steps ahead of .axmoun ed decisions and breaking events. ' Preq ntly when it was impossible to get .somethiig done, arrange an appointment or 'get a v itor into a special tour, Mr. Caffrey ,fotuid 4is longstanding connections around 'Washin ton invaluable and the impossible became1 the possible. A do -faced man who rarely smiled, Mr. Caffrey nevertheless had a good sense of , humor hind prized friendships, of which he had nn y. His assessments of individuals , and ev nts were frank, measured and based on a VT alth of experience. ' His 1 yalty to the men he served in Con- gress w 8 =wavering, and their welfare Was , paramo t with him. In addition to serving as chief of staff, Mr. Caffrey used his news- paper xperience as a solid 'oakikground for ' hsndliig his Congresstnan's press relations. He r gularly referred to the man he served as "the boss." One 4mbetlishment he brat. ght to his office was a arge overgrown brandy snifter-type , glass b wl, which he kept filled with small candle, and visitors regularly dropped in while 'passing by" to help themselves. Mr. laffrey rarely allowed himself td be roused to sharp anger. His advice to those whose blood pressure started to rise at some setbacl was always keep sweet. He 4eliglited in attending occasional Re- public n Party functions in New York City, and h was active in the Republican congres- sional secretaries' organization known as the Bull Elephants. One of his hobbies was the collection of model of airplanes and rockets and missiles that brightened the Capitol Hill office. For many years he attended the opening-day baseball games in Washington, but skipped recent ones because of the raw weather. . 11:1 His eath prevented Mr. C'affrey from par- 1 ticipa ing in a forthcoming Washington i "firstl?a reception President and Mrs. John- son see planning for top congressional aids. I 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 ILECORD-- APPENDIX A2373 [From the WateIrtown- (N.Y.) Times May 11, .965] KILBURN PAY d Tnistax TO LATE GEORGE CAPFREY MAYON, May 11.?Former Congressman' Clarence E.Kirrn, Malone, today termed the passing of eorp T. Caffrey, 60, Arling- ton, Va., as a terrible blow to the entire Kilburn family.' Mr. Caffrey, Who i erved for 25 years as ad- ministrative ass's.% -it to the Malone Repub- lican in Washingtou, died of a heart attack while visiting his lister, Mrs. John Patrick (Gail) Gardes, in Poughkeepsie Saturday. Mr. Kilburn ;said that Mr. Caffrey was a "very close friend * * * and the best assist- ant on Capitol HIS." He said the congres- sional aid was. "an honest and forthright man who worked lad for the north coun- try." Mr. Kilburn 'continued: "I don't know, in the 25 years I Was there (Washington), how I could havegeitter along without him. Mr. Caffrey's death!. was a terrible blow to the entire Kilburn' fair fly." Mr. Caffrey Iserv;d as administrative as- sistant to Rep4sentative ROBERT C. MCEWEN, Republican, Of Dgclensburg, up to the time of his death. Betore serving as Mr. Kilburn's chief of 'staff, Mr. Caffrey was the top aid to Representative:Wallace E. Pierce, Republican, Of Plattsburgh, for 1 year. . ? [Prom the OgelenstUrg Journal, May 10, 19651 GEORGE T. CAli,FEEI", VETERAN Am TO THREE CONGREISSIIIN, DIED SATURDAY Congressma$ McEwEN said today: "Words fail to espress my shock, my pro- found sorrow and deep feeling of personal loss on the passing of George T. Caffrey. More than th atle congressional assistant that he was, e was a trusted aid, a wise counselor, an a warm personal friend." Mrs. Esther Van Wagoner Tufty, Washing- ton correspomient for the Ogdensburg Jour- nal, said: "With George Cliffrey as adminMtrSitive as- sistant to Co greismen from the 31st Dis- trict for more thao 25 years, the district has really had two Co rgressmen in the House of Representatives. '9.nd yet, George would not like me to say tha ;, for fear he would be tak- ing something away from the three men whom he servrd. ? "George T. Caf'rey was a newspaper re- porter's kind .131 acroinistrative assistant. He . knew news?aonaetimes even before it hap- pened. And he 'rept his news sources in- formed. He Would evaluate the importance of national and world events to the local congressionaldist 'Let. Add to that his steady friendship arid willingness to assist a re- porter. Yet he always kept his loyalty to the CongressMen intact. "George Caffrey was an administrative as- sistant extradrdir any." Israel's 17th Anniversary SP.N...XCH OF HON. JOSEPH P. ADDABE0 0 r NEW YORK IN THE H US13 OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, May 6, 1965 Mr. ADDABI O. Mr. Speaker, May 14 marks the 1/7th anniversary of the found- ing of the State of Israel, and it gives me pleasure to congratulate her and her peo- ple on this rnoxaentous occasion. The State of [srael was born with great struggle as was our Own Tinited States. The founders of Israel and its people have Much of the pioneering spirit that our forefathers had?we built a nation from the wilderness, Israel has built a nation from the desert. It is this spirit and determination which is responsible for the almost unbelievable st4des she has made in the short period of n years. We were the first country to recognize Israel as a nation and we want to be in the forefront of those congratulating her on her success and reassure her of our continued support and best wishes for continued growth and prosperity. Reinstatement of the Bracer? Program ? Urged EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. DON H. CLAUSEN OP CALIFORNIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, May 13, 1965 Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, much has been said lately about the bracer() program---proponents of its abolishment have ? advanced beautiful arguments that we have a plentiful do- mestic labor force to do the work cif the bracero; that the fresh fruit and vege- table growers would be well served; that the Nation's welfare would be enhanced by the utilization of this domestic labor. We are now confronted with not the fine-sounding logic?but with the grim reality. I hope every Member of Congress will read the following communications, describing In real terms the already dev- astating effects of the ill-advised action to abolish the bracer() program. I think it is incumbent upon all Members of Con- gress to seriously consider the reinstate- ment of the bracer? program?vital not only to the grower, the canner, and the trucker, but to the economy of our entire Nation. The communications follow: MENDOCINO COUNTY PONIONA GRANGE, No. 10? Willits, Calif., May 5, .1965. Hon. Dosr Cususew, House of Representatives. Washington, D.C. . DEAR ME. CLAUSEN: At .their regular meet- ing on April 25, 1965, members of Mendo- dno County Pomona Orange No. 10 heard the reading of the following, which M based on a report originally presented at a meeting of Little Lake Grange No. 670, Willits, Calif., by a member of its committee on agriculture. The members voted to send the report to several persons, and this copy is for you. "Pertaining to agriculture in the State of California, it appears that we have a, major problem, the seriousness of which a good proportion of our population does not fully realize. This problem exists because of the abolishment of Public Law 78, preventing Mexican nationals from coming into Califor- nia to work at harvesting our farm products, as most Americans are unwilling to go to the fields and work under the scorching sun for $1.25 an hour. "According to the Santa Rosa Press Demo- crat for March 28, our honorable Secretary Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 ?Mau fk., 1 Atproved For se /(3436: wilt67T "MO0080005-4 9 9 out of control. Maybe so. Certainly Bosch himself is a decent committed democrat with a small d, even if he is an ineffectual political leader. Bit after ,the Castro eXperience should one have expected President Johnson to take a course of ,action?or nonaction? that might well haveled to a second Cuba off American 'calor& 'For hiro,,tO have 42rie so would not only have been out of character and out of philosophy: it would also have run counter to the land of President most of , the American people think he is, and the kind of belief they have in him. Well then, once the American troops came in, why has President Johnson piled up more and more thousandS of them? Isn't each detachment' he sends 4 further slap at the 'Latin American Self-hnage? Here again one must go back to Cuban-American history, this time to the-Bay of Pigs. The shadow of the Bay of Pigs fiasco hangs even more heavily over Washington than the shadow of Castro's persistence in power. If the Bay of Pigs invasion was a mistake then?as every- one now 6.grees?the failure to carry it through in full force compounded the mis- take many times over. That was in Ken- nedy's mind when he had to make a decision on the Russian missiles in Cuba. It will be in the mind of every President for some years to come. If history is lights and shadows, It is mostly shadows. Of course, there has been an outcry from the Latin neighbors and partners of the United States. If I Were a Brazilian, a Mexican, a Chilean, I should probably be joining in the outcry. Vet if I asked myself What alternative there was, I should have no answer._ I suspect strongly that, however great the outcry has been, it would have been dim and pale alongside the withering con- tempt of the Latin American leaders if the United States had done nothing, if its citi- zens had been killed, and if the revolt had led to another Castro regime?or a Castro- oriented one?in Santo Domingo. ? The satisfying 'fact is that the OAS politi- cal presence has been enabled to estanlish Itself alongside the U.S. military presence. There are dead to be 'buried, wounds to be bound up, food to be distributed, the routines of life to be restored. A new leadership will in time be found, and with heavy economic aid it will be able to make a new beginning of order. Whatever may be said against the Americans, they will not stay any longer than the minimal nerd fi.:tr them. They will get out. That would not have been true of the Castroites, if they had been given a chance to turn the rebellion into a class dictatorship. Israel Anniversary EXTENSION OF REMARKS 95 HON. THOMAS M. PELLY OF WASHINGTON IN THE gousE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, May 13, 1965 Mr. pErax. Mr. Speaker, it was 17 Years ago that the Union Jack was low- ered over Palestine, marking the end of British rule over that area. May 14, 1948, saw the emergence of a new Ilati(V, the State of Israel. This is a nation vhic:ti has created an example, of what a _people can do when given the right of self-determination; she is a model of democracy in action. Yes, Mr. Speaker, 17 years ago this dream of almost 1,900 years became a reality as the blue and white flag ,with the Star of David took its rightful place among the banners of the free world. It has not been easy for the people of Israel these last 17 years, as it has not been for the last 1,900 years, because hostile neighbors have attempted to drive the Jewish people out of Israel. Eut this gallant nation has stood stead- fast and grown strong and self-reliant. I join with my colleagues and say mazeltov to the people of Israel. Chicago Sun-Times Editor Retires EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. DONALD RUMSFELD OF mirrors IN Tlig HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, May 13, 1965 Mr. RTJMSFELD. Mr. Speaker, I wish to pay particular honor and recognition today to a distinguished and truly out- standing Chicago newspaperman, Mr. Milburn P. Akers, who is retiring after a quarter century of service with the Chicago Sun-Times. Throughout his career, Mr. Akers has made extraordi- nary contributions to his community, State, and the Nation. Readers of his columns and editorials will long remember his discerning re- porting on national and world affairs, as -well as his public spirit and dedication to the causes of good government and edu- cation. A Chicago Sun-Times article, which follows, highlights Mr. Akers' ca- reer and pays due respect to his leader- ship: AKERS To RETIRE AS SUN-TIMES EDITOR , (By Donald M. Schwartz) Milburn P. Akers announced his retirement Saturday as editor of the Chicago Sun-Times after a quarter of century of service with this newspaper. Akers, who reached the retirement age of 65 earlier this month, will step down as edi- tor on Monday, June 7. In accepting Akers' resignation, Marshall Field, publisher of the ,Sun-Times, praised Akers' many contributions to the paper. "All the years of my working newspaper life have been spent in close and pleasant association with Pete Akers," Field said. "His vigor,, professional knowledge, and journalistic integrity have been invaluable to me. ."Much of what the Sun-Times has become Is a reflection of his leadership." And, as Akers discussed his retirement with a re- porter, it was typical that he was at his type- writer composing one of his columns on cur- rent affairs. (The column will continue to appear once a week in the Sunday Sun-Times even after Akers' retirement.) LIKE A MUSICIAN 'Now and again he would dash off a few sentences or perhaps only a few words, then pause and ponder, taking a drag on a cig- arette hardly noticing it in his fingers 'or at his lips. Then he would start up again at the ma- chine with only a few of his fingers doing the work?they skipped about' easily a bouncy, jaunty fashion that may oldtime newspapermen use. It was more like a musician playing an instrument than a skilled typist operating a machine. "Best one-fingered typist in the country," 42375 Akers threw out in an aside that disturbed his attention to the growing column as little as the drag on the cigarette. Pete Akers had been doing that for a long time-42 years?in a career that began as a cub reporter on the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 1923. From there, he went to the Illinois State Register in Sprinfleld; the Associated Press, for which he worked in Springfield, Chicago, and Washington, and finally to the old Sun and the Sun-Times, where he be- came successively managing editor, executive editor, and editor. , Pete Akers had pounded on typewriters in countless newspaper offices and Western Union offices, in the Senate Press Gallery in Washington, in the statehouse in Spring- fiejd, in small towns in southern Illinois, during the bloody days there when he worked for the P-D. He had roamed the broad cir- cuit of a big-time newspaperman and writ- ten of what he saw just as his great-grand- father, Peter Akers, a Virginia planter's son who. became a Methodist minister, roamed the country from his birthplace to Kentucky, to Illinois, to Minnesota, telling of what he saw, and. how it could be improved. That was in the back of Pete Akers' mind too?how things could be improved?and it came out especially when he moved into posi- tions of command in the newspaper business. It also is a major theme of the work he has done in government, education, and religion, much of it closely related to his newspaper career. Asked why he went to work for Illinois Got. Henry Horner as his publicity man in 1936 (a job he held 3 years), Akers replied: "I just thought he was a high-grade, first- class Governor who shouldn't be displaced." The Chicago Democratic machine had turned against the Democratic Governor and he faced a tough primary contest. A TOTAL COMMITMENT Perhaps Akers' commitment to improving things can be shown, as well as anywhere, in the job he did on the Sun-Times. Al- though he himself balks at comparisons between his ministerial forebears and the moral, crusading tone of his newspaper career, a colleague on the Sun-Times notes that as boss of the paper he "operated almost as though it were a total commitment"? like a dedicated preacher answering a call to a pulpit. Akers became managing editor of the Sun-Times and started converting it as fast as he could into a paper of stature, serious- ness, and substance. "That was Mr. Field's desire," he observed. The new managing editor faced serious practical problems, some of which stemmed from the fact that he was trying to meld Into a single paper, with its own identity, two vastly different papers?the serious- minded Sun and the tabloid Times, which had been merged shortly before he took over. "If you went either way," he recalled, "if you went to the old Sun or the old Times, you had the problem of losing part of your audience. So you had the problem of making the change very slowly so you didn't lose your audience." As it was, Akers later had the nerve- wracking experience of losing large parts of his audience when the Sun-Times, a 24- hour-a-day paper up to the mid-1950's started lopping off afternoon editions to be- come solely a morning paper. "That was the toughest thing I ever had," he said. "I'd come down to work and find I'd lost 50,000 circulation and I was supposed to make it up the next day." , The changes came slowly and were many. In January 1950, the headline type was changed from Karnak to Vogue, a purely technical point it may seem, but it was movement from blocky, jarring, rather crude looking headlines, to a more modern and streamlined typeface. Moreover, said Akers ApprOved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 A2376 Approved For Re!easel 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 eONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX May 1,719Si in a memo to the staff: "With the larger unit count in the heads, it is hoped that the iase of such abbreviations as 'exec,' ma,' 'dad ''cop,' hood,"con,' * * ? can be greatly reduced, if not eliminated entirely." Classic `earrnark,s of tabloidism were being dropped over the side eve .a while the paper, in si e, remained in the tabloid format. ers also 'introduced longer stories on seri us subjects, inchiding education and reli on, and permitted more interpretive re- port rig in the paper, a technique which new paper editors often praise but frequently hay been reluctant to use, and this was espe tally true 15 years ago. A LINK TO HIS OIEMCAREER Trup with Akers' own career and his d turn toward interpretive reporting was link own style as a writer ar.d reporter. As a repo ter for the Associated Press, during a tim when it stressed a raechanIcal, almost in.hi4man objectivity, he had suffered under sucl restraints, which he later described in a spee h as "a rather sterile formtila known as Objective reporting." At the Sun-Times he sought out intelligent reporters and gave them a little more elbowroom to tell what -was going on instead of merely serving as consleyor belts for disparate facts. E en the stylebook issaed during Akers' ten re as executive editor speaks of the cha ges he was bringing about. M :aewspaper stylebooks are dry, me- cha ical things which deal mainly with con- tractions of State names and what words to c pitalize. But the Akels stylebook, issued in 155, had a style of its own?a philosophy of riting?and a careful y articulated out- look on such matters as good taste and fair ess. S1nultaneous rebuttal, for example, was one f the earmarks of the book and became so ir the newspaper. It was the time of McCarthyism and the exec tive editor, as he had then become, in- sisted that those who were attacked, perhaps unf irly and inaccurately, should have a cha ce to reply, simultaneously, in the same story. IMPROVEMENT ON CON MIINITT LEVEL ere were many other changes large and snaalll, such as a special Sunday section to dea comprehensively with important topics, and in time these added np to a new reputa- tioI for the tabloid that acted like a quality pa pr, a reputation that apread beyond Chi- oag and caused a Saturday Review writer to dee are 11; the best paper in town. Btrt while Akers was improving the paper insi e he was also pursuing improvement out4lde, in the community. A close 'colleague on the paper in those day describes him as a 'crusading, Investi- gatIve newspaperman." Gardon F,. Michelson, pr iden; of MacMurray College, Jacksonville, Ill.? with whom Akers has had much asso- cia on, Said, "His whole journalistic career has beer. tinged with social justice." A ers at the Sun-Times instituted and pre- sid d over many crusades, many investiga- tio s?the disclosure that an alderman was sha Mg in legal fees paid on zoning varla- tiosts obtained through the city council, stoi1les that forced a Democratic guberna- torijal candidate to withdraw from the race, rev lations about the high coats of hauling surlus foods to schools in the State. Iot all the stories were major crusades or inv stigstions. There was also the time, in 195), when Akers sent a reporter up to Wis- con in to get the background on the late Se tor Joseph R. McCarthy, Republican, of Wi. oonsin, who was just beginning his rise as s Communist hunter. kers, the editor, from having known Mc- Carithy when he was lacers, the reporter, th ght the Senator was far from being the ad 'rabbi, figure that some thought him to be nd he instructed a reporter to get the rest of the stoi y, which he printed in a series of articles; i IYIiSSIVE KNOWLEDGE The reporter recalls that, in addition to the importance of the subject matter and how much it preceded most assessments of Mc- Carthy, the assignment also illustrated two facets of Alters as a newsman, First, he had encountered McCarthy on one of hisimany political reporting journeys and had ;forraed a firsthand impression, something,inci; spensable to a good journalist. The reporter noted that this was part of Akers' "mtissivs knowledge of things"?from books, experience, from having been around a long tit 1:1 a lot of places and having his eyes op n? a characteristic emphasized by many who' hale known him. A writer who has sat in on c ditorial conferences with him has spoken of .titers' far-ranging mind. The seccind ioint about the McCarthy as- signment, said the reporter, was that Akers did it with? at fooling around, without worrying dbou:, the paper's image. One of the most revealing of the Alters stories, for what it shows about the man, was the Mdretti case. i MO CETT/ CASE RECALLED Michael:Moretti was a 33-year-old police.. man assig ed to the State's attorney's office Who shot wo youths to death and wounded a third, br was not indicted when his case was first sought before the county grand jury. He , pleaded self-defense, but the wounded inan claimed that he killed in an unprovoked rage. Akers eltploied and the Sun-Times de- manded a? reopening of the case, claiming a whitew4h by the States' attorney's office to protect ,one of its own. Moretti was sub- sequently indiited and convicted of murder. Why wa;s Alters so Outraged by the case, into which he threw all his energy and ex- pertise, all aviiilable resources on the paper and the peper's name itself? When he was asked that, he s aid: "That murder could be covered up; that murder colald le whitewashed. ? "Here were a couple of human beings with no stetus in our society. "That they could be shot, killed, murdered, and whiteWashed by the people who did it." That was his answer, but under question- ing he toot it i urther. "I have, saic; to young people in speeches many times tiat I believe in the American capitalistiS syatem and the American demo- cratic sysem, and I am utterly opposed to corruption of either. "The only way we can retain these systems is to be ccintirmally on the alert to eradicate the abuse q of either, and there are abuses. "So whdn as snething like the Moretti case came along-- and the democratic system which is iupposed to dispense equal justice wasn't doing 1;o?this violated a basic belief of mine. If I didn't believe so much in the systems, 11 wouldn't get so violent about the abuses." , A colleague who worked closely with Akers on the Moretti story suggesed another, simpler elemeat?"the fact that young men were involved." One of the slain was only 15. "Pete ii sol about kids," the colleague remarked, an i the point linked up with something Air us himself sdid about another, current story that has moved him?South Vietnam. ' In 1964 he visited that war-brutalized country and since his return he has written about it ofter, in his Sun-Times column. Sometimes the column, on Vietnam, has not been Cool and analytical but outraged, as when he Wrote on February 22 that the Viet- namese people were being "grour.d to pieces" while the United States held back from negotiations. DASCRISES VIETNAM INCIDENTS Akers described the other day what lay behind those i eelings. Approved For Release "I was down in the delta country in South Vietnam. Somewhere they'd killed a nest of Vietcong the night before. "Here was a bunch of little people heaped on the ground, in the position they had fallen, and died in. You turned them over and looked at them and most of them were little kids 16 or 17." Akers, of course, Las not always been struggling with such heartrending subjects as youths foully murdered in Chicago or youths heaped up dead. in South Vietnam. A familiar scene in his office at the Sun- Times VMS to find hira chatting with staff members?really passing the time of day in smantown style while editors drifted in and out to consult with him. Akers, although he happened to :have been born in Cook County, was really from Jack- sonville, where his father was a Methodist minister, the third in a line of Methodist ministers. He grew up amid a rural Illinois where his family had been for three generations before him; where he absorbed the atmosphere of the Lincoln country, the habit of thinking for himself, and a prejudice against being high flown. He also .Started an unending study of the State, in books and in person, and is known in his profession for an en- cyclopedic knowledge of Illinois, down to little bits and pieces, obscure rivers and out of the way highway routes. . He is not a slick, modern man,. He is a bulky figure, often in rumpled clothes, with a massive head and small, pudgy hands. He looks like a man who might have been found in a small county cons thouse a generation or two ago. But he is deceptive; he can be very ranch up to date as he proved in transform- ing the Sun-Times. He is a reader?not just one who reads books, occasionally or often, but one who is at home with books, relishes the books, re- laxes with books. Reading is his hobby? chiefly biography, history, politics. His mother and father, he says, were readers, his mother?Massachusetts born?having been among the first women graduates of Syracuse University and later a schoolteacher. EDUCATION A MAJOR INTEREST His interests outsid.e newspapering have run to education, and he is credited by one qualified source with having saved his alma meter, McKendree College, from extinction. Some Methodist Church officials thought it too costly to continue supporting. But Akers waged a successful battle to preserve it, and one small college official observed that now, what with the great air turn in enrollments, a college like McKendres, only 20 miles from populous St. Louis, can't fail. Michelson, president of MacMurray, said that Akers, at a trustee, and chairman of the school's development committee, has played a commanding role in MacMurray's recent expansion. . He is chiefly respOnsible, for one thing, for the founding of a men's college at the Mac- Murray campus where there was previously only a girl's school. At both places, MacMurray and McKen- dree, he was tending the deep roots put down in Illinois by his great-grandfather. Peter Akers was the principal founder of MacMurray and the first president of Mc- Kendree. SCHOLARSHIPS SET UP After his retirement Akers will continue as the head of a statewide committee attempt- ing to make the job of State superintendent of public instruction an appointive office? an effort to take the Important position out of politics. The Sun-Times recognized this deep in- volvement with education in an announce- ment last week by Executive Editor Emmett Dedmon that three annual Chicago Sun- Times college scholarships in honor of Mil- burn P. Akers had been established. 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 1.7t61; Approved For Releasta01/46thRflirc78A4461A3a jI5a0080005-4 than the tenants, and promote slums rather than decent housing. If the Commissioners can agree there's an "emergency"?and there is?perhaps they might try promoting some one- or two-block urban renewal projects?for public housing. It might not work, but it seems worth the at- tempt. It'll take a while to get to the suburbs. [From the Washington (D.C.) Evening Star, July 15, 1965] NEW GROU' TO PUSH Low Lwcoms Housum (By Benjamin Forgey) An informal District organization calling itself the Ad Hoc Committee on the Housing Crisis was formed last night to seek an in- crease in low-income housing. Representatives of about 20 housing, civil rights, labor, political, welfare and church organizations endorsed the program, but left the exact nature of the new group in doubt as they returned to report to their own organizations. Harris Weinstein, chairman of the housing corntalttee of the Washington Planning and Housing Association, said he hoped action on some of the proposals would begin this week. The most "immediate and substantial need," Weinstein told the group, was to lobby Lor, be4Weclrcsitlential. We Of. the Anacostia- !dolling and National Training School sites. Competing proposals for use of these tracts, the last large, available publicly owned sites In the District, are being discussed in Congress. The group also voted to urge the District Commissionerat to Use "whatever powers they now have" to nae repairs on slum prop- erties and charge the repairs to landlords. According to the resolution, the Commis- sioners. will also be asked to seek legislation preventing "retaliatory" evictions and rent increases. Also proposed was a "housing crisis week- end" during which clergymen will focus their sermons on the need for low-income housing and a tour of the District's slums for inter- ested Public officials. The meeting was the result of a vvPHA effort to "bring the housing needs of the District before the public," and was a follow- up an initial session held last Thursday. k'OREIGN POLICY MISMANAGEMENT (Jr. DERWINSIa (at the request of Mr. DON H. CLauseN) was granted per- mission to extend his remarks at this pOint in the Rgcosn and to include ex- traneous matter.) Mr. pErmaNsKa. Mr. Speaker, the Oontinliecl deterioration of our conduct Of foreign affairs is seen in many parts of the werkl. However, the spineless handling of the Na,sser administration in Egypt certainly is fully indicative of for- eign policy mismanagement. When are we going to wake up and realize that we are being taken for a ride? Egypt is doing a good job of mak- ing a fool out of the United States. Less than a Month ago, Egypt's Nasser took a full advantage of American willingness to hand out free wheat. Now, we find out that the Agency for International Development gave Egypt over 23 million elellarS' worth of corn in 1961 on the basis of an out and out misrepresenta- ly diStinguished colleague, the gen- tleman from Minnesota [Mr. LANGEN], has called attention to the report of the Genera; Accounting Office that a ship- ment of 186,000 metric tons of corn to Egypt under the auspices of AID was ob- tained under false pretenses. The grant was made on the basis of reports from the Communist-sympathizing country of a potential famine because of a serious crop failure. It was later disclosed that no crop failure occurred and much of the corn had been sold by Egypt. The gentleman from Minnesota [Mr. Louigarr] further disclosed that AM of- ficials found out Egypt was selling some of the corn even before the whole grant was shipped. With over $11 million worth still in the hands of U.S. officials, AID apparently made no attempt to hold the shipments until the matter could be Investigated. The GAO report charged that AID did not check on distribution of over 85 percent of the corn, and it has been substantiated that at least 80,000 tons have been sold by the Egyptian Government. This report confirms what I have been saying for years. The administration will spend taxpayers' dollars to give aid to any country which stretches out its hand. I want to commend the General Accounting Office on its alertness. I hope this report opens some eyes in Washing- ton. If it does not, it seems we will con- tinue to help a country that openly de- grades the United States and is critical of our policy. What is needed is action by the Con- gress to insure that any future grants would be made only when It is assured that all the aid goes for the purpose for which it was intended. Apparently, the Agency for International Development does not do this now. As a member of the House Foreign Af- fairs Committee which has been duti- fully rubberstamping administration measures for years, I would hope that the committee would recognize its legis- lative responsibilities and concentrate on Implementation of a foreign policy whereby we would reject the blackmail pressures from rulers such as Nasser. Nasser is using anti-Israel statements as a smokescreen for bis domestic fail- ures, and there is no reason why we should prop up his administration, which Is carrying on an aggressive military ac- tion against the legitimate government and people of Yemen. (Mr. BURTON of Utah (at the re- quest of Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN) was granted permission to extend his re- marks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous matter.) [Mr. BURTON of Utah's remarks will appear hereafter in the Appendix.] (Mr. BURTON of Utah (at the request of Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN) was granted permission to extend his remarks at this point in the RECORD and to include ex- traneous matter.) [Mr. BURTON of Utah's remarks will appear hereafter in the Appendix.] MEMBERS OF THE JOINT COMMIS- SION ON THE COINAGE The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the pro- visions of Public Law 89-81, the Chair appoints as members of the Joint Com- mission, on the Coinage the following July 26, 1965 Members on the part of the House: Messrs. EDMONDSON, Gramm, Corm, and BATTEN. FURTHER MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE A further message from the Senate by Mr. Arrington, one of its clerks; an- nounced that the Senate agrees to the report of the committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (HR. 2984) entitled "An act to amend the Public Health Service Act provisions for construction of health re- search facilities by extending the expira- tion date thereof and providing increased support for the program, to authorize additional assistant secretaries in the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and for other purposes." The message also announced that the Senate agrees to the report of the com- mittee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amend- ments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 2985) entitled "An act to authorize as- sistance in meeting the initial cost of professional and technical personnel for comprehensive community mental health centers." The message also announced that the Senate agrees to the report of the com- mittee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amend- ments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. '7984) entitled "An act to assist in the provision of housing for low- and mod- erate-income families, to promote or- derly urban development, to improve living environment in urban areas, and to extend and amend laws relating to housing, urban renewal, and community facilities." The message also announced that the Senate agrees to the report of the com- mittee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amend- ments of the House to the bill (S. 510) entitled "An act to extend and other- wise amend certain expiring provisions of the Public Health Service Act relating to community health s deS, -and for other purposes." TWELFTH ANNIVERSARY OF COM- MUNIST CONQUEST OF CUBA POSES A THREAT TO AMERICA AS GREAT AS THE THREAT IN VIETNAM The SPEAKER. Under previous or- der of the House, the gentleman from Illinois [Mr. PueiNsxt] is recognized for 60 minutes. (Mr. PUCINSKI asked and was given permisd extend his re- marks and to include extraneous mat- ter.) Mr. PUCINSKI. Mr. Speaker, 12 years ago today Fidel Castro and his brother, Raul, with 101 others overran the Moncada Army Barracks in Cuba. This was the beginning of Castro's war to overthrow Bastista. It was the be- ginning of Castro's betrayal of the Cu- ban people by permitting the Soviets to establish the first Communist regime in Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 ly 2'$, 1965 Approved For Release 2003/_09/2.A.,..,%ClAffg1B00446R000500080005-Ag CONGRESSIONAL REC VA 1J -1 1.101 tails and imensions of the hou3ing problem in the 11 tions Capital." Existing data is stale, incomplete, and in- equate, Sheppard said. "Almost every- ojie living in Washington is aware generally t we afe confronted with a lousing prob- 1 ' whici is growing more serious day by y. tut' now We want the facts. The un- vrnishe and whole truth aril give us a r elistic lasis to solve the problem. ow Kizens living the these areas have vol nteered to go out personally, inter- view the r neighbors and thea collect the inforrnat on which will help us define our tals an strategies. What we need now is ore der4ent, safe housing that low-income People cah afford. 1 "This i a burning issue with us. We feel that pool4 housing is one of the etrongest con- v i tributin causes of poverty," he said. ' The c nsus is being condmted in three eighborh oods in the Cardozo area of North- est shir eon; in the neighborhood round endshfp House, 619 G Street SE.; the n ighborhood around Southeast House across t e Anacostia River, 22E3 Mount View Place SE., and in two areas in the Northeast. One i in the near Northeast, bounded 51, New York Avenue, Mount Olivet Road, Stree , and the Anacostla River. Another in th far Northeast, bounded on two sides y the ?rince Georges Count; line, and by Port D tat Road and the Anacostia River, and a t ? ird Ea urban renewal area Northwest 1No. 1 ar.und Union Station. , A fly. -page survey form Includes ques- tions o the number of people living in a dwell their income, rent, and mortgage schedul s. Interviewers will seek informa- tion fro renters about landlord-tenant re- lations ips, lease patterns and eviction . proble They ill pinpoint the actual physical con- ditions !of each dwelling unit, sanitary con- ditions) the state of repair or disrepair, heat- ing facilities, and trash ani garbage col- lection ervice. ' Inter iewers have been organized into area teams ly the neighborhood anvisory councils. Data gathered will be tallied from August munit August 8. This is expected to be 4-7. .1. report will be issued to the corn- by an action program based on the endations. followi recom [Prom Bot the la The 1 diff are the te ity co the Washington (D.0 ) Evening Star, July 20, 1965] MPL1ANCE ON SEPAIRE IS OFTEN LONG DELATR) landlord and tenant complain about k of a clear standard for enforcement. ndlord says different inspectors use t criteria for spotting violations, and ante; complain that the lack of qual- trol permits landlords to use cheap mater als in repairs. The code specified only that "workmanlike" job be done. Nei hborhood workers attempting to help alum dwellers with their housing problems have been annoyed by the housing division's policy of allowing only landlords and tenants to se violations records. Mallon said he was caking an exception to his rule when repor -rs, after filling out detailed fOrms re- quiri ? g both Mallon's and the Corporation COLA Ri'S signatures, were permitted to see the r cords. All he division's records are filed by street addre There is no central file listing vio- lator by name. The inspectors become fa- milia with habitual offenders, but there is no ea y way' to determine any owner's entire histo y of code violations. Bu mostly it is the long delays and the cons rat threat of retaliating evictions that frustf ate sit* dwellers seeking to get re- pairs in their homes. And perhaps it is the dela s that have led to the suspicion by the teoa4its that inspectors can be bought off by land ords. One real estaie Iran said that yearn ago, owners and agents always provided the in- spectors with generc us Christmas gifts. "We all used to d3 it," he said, "but, then one time an inspector came by to get his gift, and I saw' his car was packed full of whisky so I cut it out." The agent said le now occasionally will ask an inspector to .3ortie by one of his prop- erties to advise 'Mir about repairs that will be necessary to meat the code. "I usually give them $5 or $10 for the favor," he said, "but I've only Clone this a couple of dozen times in the past 25 years." S. Tudor Strang deputy superintendent of the housing, div slon, said: "If we knew the point where slum landlords will leave the market and be replaced by people not interested in eXplo ting tenants. But step- ped-up enforcner t as Mallon points out, would require bomIderably more inspectors. Several week a ago, District Commissioner Walter N. Tobriner suggested what he calls a "reformulation" of the code. He agrees with many slugn landlords?that the minor aspects of the code should not be empha- sized. Tobriner fears that with strict enforce- ment and lower pi ofits "the landlord, either evicts the tenants, rehabilitates the prop- erty and rent* to high income groups, or evicts the tenants, razes the building and converts the land to some other use." "There is a dilemma," Tobriner said. Tough enforcement could have the unin- tended effect Of reducing the housing supply rather than *proving housing conditions. Still other cpmpiaints about slum housing center on the Landlord and Tenant Court. Cases handled the re last year amounted to more than HMO and Chief Judge John Lewis Smith, Jr., estimates the figure will exceed 100,060 this year. The proceedings in the court are summary, usually withotat extensive argument. More than 95 percent 31 the eases in the court deal with nonpe.yrnent of rent while most of the others ineolve housing code violations. In the nonpayment cases, Smith said, if the tenant a4nits having not paid the rent, the only judgmer t possible will be in favor of the landlord. The law does not give the tenant the right to withhold his rent be- cause his landlon, has failed to make repairs or improvemants, Smith said. The wording of the law and the role of the judges in enforcing the law have led slum dweller, to complain that the court is merely a collection agency for landlords. Civil rights organizations and antipoverty officials in Was aington are now seeking changes in the la T, but Smith said that what- ever reforms, are made must come through legislation or appelate court decisions, not from the Landlord and Tenant Court. [From the Wash .ngton (D.C.) Post, July 14, 1965] POTOMAC WtiTCH 110178ING SHORTAGE THE TARG4T, tivosTRATTON THE THEME AT Discussiorir (l8y George Lardner Jr.) Frustration was the theme. The city's Shot tage of low-cost housing was the target. ' The audience sounded aroused. But the meMbe :s of more than 23 housing organizations, civil rights groups, and pub- lic agencies who gathered to try to "do some- thing" about the housing crisis seemed to realize they'. we 'e punching futilely at the same old paper I3ag?full of exorbitant rents, dilapidated !homes, slumlords, and the bu- reaucratic delays facing almost any attempt at improveMent "We seenci to be moving backwards," said Stephen J. Poilak, president-elect of the Washington Planning and Housing Associa- tion which Called the meeting. . "A tent on the Mall would be an enor- mous improvement for more people than I care to think of," said Barrie Weinstein, the. associatien's housing committee chairman. The District of Columna Coalition of Conscience has been trying to put up a tent for a family of 13?with two working mothers--who were evicted last month, but can't find new quarters. The emergency housing program the city loudly promised in May for predicaments like this may take another 3 months to get started, ac- cording to city officials Who are not accus- tomed to rushing. Forty-five real estate agents and nine pub- lic and private agencies had been called, said Coalition Co-Chairman Walter E. Fauntroy, but none could come up with a single unit that the family could afford. The tent, of course, is a gimmick?but an appropriate one. As Mr. Fauntroy said, "we have to create pressure to effect the cures." One WPHA worker who helps families in the Cardozo area told of an eight-room house worth $17,600 that produces gross rentals of $600 a month for its owner. The worker, Torn Firor, also told of an- other landlord who "for the 40th time in the last 6 months has evicted or threatened to evict families because they called the city's Housing Division" to get needed repairs ordered. Another WPHA worker, Belvie Rooks, broke into tears when she described how her organization had to pay 6300 a month in back rent to "one of the worst slumlords in the city" to save a mother of seven from evic- tion from a house with broken-down plumb- ing and inadequate beating. The family, Miss Rooks said, had been living there for 3 years when the old ownee died. Suddenly, she said, the rent went up from $50 a month with utilities to $100 a month--without The audience had plenty of suggestions? ranging from rent controls, to tougher en- forcement of the housing code to easing the housing code's restrictions against over- crowding. Mr. Fauntroy Suggested that citizens' or- gailleations start scouring the suburbs for sites?a suggestion that should we well worth pursuing under the administration's rent subsidy program before Congress. He pro- posed that "we move into the surrounding area and, if necessary, purchase land to re- lieve the (city's housing) need." But no one followed through with the thought. Despite the suggestions, the meet- ing reflected, primarily, a feeling of exas- peration at all the years gone by without any substantial progress. "What we called victories really just switched people around the slums," said Lillian Secundy of the Washington Urban League. The WPM. had drafted a statement calling for more low-income housing in the city and action on several lcng-stalled projects, but the audience didn't bother to endorse it. "Pious paragraphs," said one speaker. ."Too wishy-washy," said another. Pollak agreed, but added: "I'm wonder- ing what we can do." He suggested develop- ment of a "plan of actio:a" backed by a fed- eration of all interested organizations. But no one could do anything right away. They've got their boards of directors to check with. Everyone, it seems, is saddled with his own bureaucracy?which brings us back to the District Building. District Commissioner Walter N. 'Tobriner has suggested "an emergency in low-cost housing" might be declared?so the Com- missioners could temporarily lift relatively minor housing code requirements in run- down neighborhoods. The suggestion was sincerely made, but It hardly seems an adequate response to an emergency. If it had any noticeable effect, it would probably benefit the landlords more Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 iuy 26.-19e5Approved For titlymtgggoiwAt :1tA1tn6zargititspoo0500080005-4 17503 the Western Hemisphere.' Thi.s day is no* celebrated by the Communists as the 26th of Silly movement,. Two years ego 1Vienibers on both sides of this aisle 101/led in presenting to the House a series oraddresses about a plan ? "to fight the cbld *at and to win back Cuba for derhocracY.' Today, 2 years later, here we are on dead center. We face the same prob- lem: "What to do about Cuba?" For the redord, let us review the situa- tion in that beleaguered island only 90 miles from the eastern coastline of the United States. Cuba, once a prosperOus country; with one of the highest standards of living in Latin America, has been reduced to a primitive society. There is no freedom of the individual, no free press or radio. Letters received by Free Cuba Radio from Cuba tell of hunger, insufficient clothing, few dairy necessities?the paralysis of much industry. Marxism dominates school curriculum from the ntirsery up through university level. The army is goviet trained and the peo- ple are terrorized by informers in the sO-called defense committees. Even the children- are foreed to spy on their parents. Conservatively, 80,000 Cuban Men and women are now in Jail, forced to live under indescribable conditions. Daily executions are' cOmmonplace. Despite a good sugar harvest this year, the economy is at rock bottom. Castro has few dolars for exchange. Diseases have reached epfdemic proportions 04nong both people and livestock. Medi- Cines ,and qualified doctors are scarce, health measures deplorable. Child mor- tality continues to mount. Out of a population of apprdxlinately 7 million, 500,000 have left the country. It is es- timated that 230,000 Cubans hold pass- ports and visas and are eager to leave. More than 400,000 others have filled out request forms. It IS' reported that from 85 to 90 percent of the people in Cuba are against the Conimunist regime. How and why then do the Communists stay in power? The answer is that with 500,000 men and women under arms and with a highly trained secret police, the G-2, the Cuban people live in constant terror and under suppression of these spies and guns._ Castro's aim was not to free the Cuban people from Batista's dictatorship. His whole design was to create an arsenal and launching ped -for Communist sub- version to carry on their "wars of libera- tion' in Latin America. The New York Times in a recent editorial, put it this way: The wars of liberation are aimed primarily against the United Slates. Anywhere in the non-Communist world, a gain for the East is a loss for the West' and the United States is the major power in the free world. ,t49 .past 2 years there has been o parativeTy little talk about Cuba. Vietnain tias crowded Havana from the front pages. Man y% well-meaning Amer- icans have been lulled to complacency by the coexistence line and that Cuba is no threat to the United States. In the meantime Communist propaganda and Not. 135-4 subversion emanating from the Cuban launching pad are defeating our foreign policy. On March 10 Hewson A. Ryan, associate director for policy and plans of the U.S. Information Service, before a Senate Committee, pointed out the direc- tion the propaganda of the Communist nations is taking: Communist propaganda strategy for Latin America is directed toward the destruction of U.S. power and influence in the area and ultimately to the imposition of Marxist- Leninist regimes throughout the hemisphere. In a Pravda editorial of January 14, 1965, and in the subsequent communique on the Havana Meeting of Latin American Commu- nist Parties, Moscow has made it clear that in Latin America it will use "all forms of struggle, both peaceful and nonpeaceful" to further the goals of international commu- nism. While the U.S.S.R,, Red China, and Cuba differ little on their ultimate aims in Latin America, their short-term propaganda strategy and tactics do vary somewhat. The major themes in Cuban propaganda are "independence from Yankee imperialism" and the "advantages of a Socialist economy." To carry on their propaganda activities in Latin America the Communists utilize in varying degrees all the modern communica- tions media. Radio Havana is broadcasting 125 hours weekly in Spanish, 14 hours in Creole for Haiti, 7 hours each in Portuguese and English, an hour and 20 minutes in Guarani for Paraguay, and 30 minutes in Aymara. Cuba's Spanish service includes a regular program for Venezuela, which has been used by members of the Venezuelan Armed Forces of National Liberation exiled in Cuba to broadcast direct appeals for in- surrection against the Venezuelan Govern- ment. Turncoats from Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Peru, and Dominican Republic broadcast frequently to their respective home countries from Cuba, also. The Cuban serv- ice even includes a weekly half hour program entitled "The Voice of Free Dixie" and is directed to the American Negro population. Although not generally known until Pravda reported it on January 14 of this year, Central and South American Com- munist Party leaders, together with Moscow agents and Castro, and his aides, met in Havana in late November 1964, to plan their combined strategy for further subverting Latin America. The report of the Special Consultative Committee on Security of the Pan American Union?April 12-May 7, 1965? derived the following conclusions from the conference of the Communists: That, for the present, Cuba agrees to con- tinue to follow Moscow's lead. That the Castro regime will continue to serve as the principle tool of communism for the subversion of the Americas. That an increase of Communist subversive activities in the Americas is to be expected. ? At that meeting, they selected as their prime target for subversion, in a virtual declaration of war, Venezuela, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, and Haiti. They omitted the Dominican Re- public, their pilot project, for which battle plans already had been drawn. Also, in the early part of March 1965, a world conference of representatives of Communist Parties was held in Moscow. Representatives of 19 countries partici- pated, including those of old Communist Parties of Argentina and Brazil and the new United Socialist Revolutionary Party ?d ig the sole representative of Latin America. ?This shows the impor- tafit.e that Moscow attributes to the Cuban party in world conference. Now, Mr. Speaker, let us look at the implementation of these principles. % First, we all know what took place in Santo Domingo. On June 13 Jeremiah O'Leary, Latin American writer for the Washington Star capsuled a report from an official U.S. paper compiled by intelli- gence sources, expert in--ellinifftiffsrriL tivities. The report, chronologically and in narrative form, describes the day-by-day activities in Santo Domingo between April 24 and May 5 of 77 known Commu- nists. Many of the 77 were previously identified as participants in the revolt by U.S. Government sources on May 6, but the new document gives intimate details of their particination before and after the American intervention. The document discloses that at least 45 of the extremists had been deported from the Dominican Republic a year before and that most of them had re- ceived guerrilla warfare training in Cuba before they began drifting back into the Dominican Republic last Octo- ber. Cuba's principal agency for pro- moting revolutionary activities in Latin America, the General Directorate of Intelligence--DGI?had for some time been providing financial support to two of the three Dominican Communist parties?the 14th of June Political Group?APCJ--and the Dominican Pop- ular Movement?MPD. The other Dominican Communist group which co- operated in the rebellion is the Domini- can Popular Socialist?PSPD?party which follows the Moscow line. The revolt may have been started by some dissident army officers, but the Communist leaders of all three parties issued orders to their members to incite the civilian crowds gathering in the streets, and to stage rallies and demon- strations. We all have read of the vio- lence, wanton damage and loss of life that ensued. It is interesting that the Cuban DGI officer who handles revolutionary opera- tions for the _Dominican Republic is Roberto Santiesteban Casanova, de- ported by the United States for engaging in espionage in 1962 while serving with the Cuban delegation to the United Nations. Time is too short to present further evidence but let us review what has been happening in Latin America since the November meeting of the Latin Ameri- can Communists. Venezuela: According to a report issued by the Special Consultative Com- mittee on Security of the Pan American Union on May 7: Communist activities, which have been on the wane at the end of 1964, have broken out again and may be expected to increase with the assistance that Cuba has promised to continue to provide to the Armed Forces of National Liberation. Cuba is also continuing to provide considerable amounts of money to sup- port subversion in Venezuela. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For ? Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. I yield to the ,gen- tleman. , Mr. DONE. CLAUS/W. icompliment the gentleman on his very provocative statement. I would also ask the gentle- if the very tactics that are now being used in Latin America are not es- sentially the name as have been carried out by the Vietcong in Vietnam. Mr. PUCINSKI. They are the very Starr4 tactics. Thai, is why I think this anniveraany is of more than pass- ing interest to the American people. There has been too ittle said about what has been happening in Cuba. There are hose who, for instance, criticized our wn Government for taking strong ae- on in Santo Domingo in the Dominican epublic. The fact of the matter is we ave now recorded indisputable proof of ommunist exploitation of subversion hich Castro has been engaging in was o be tried in Santo Domingo. We can all, as Americans, regardless f what our party affiliations may be, hank the good Lard that: we have a ? esi dent who moved decisively to stop his coup in Santo Domingo. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. I would agree ompletely with the ;entleman, and I am ot a member of either the gentleman's arty or the President's party. I am onvinced in my own mind that had we ot taken this quick and decisive action, e certainly would have had another Oa in this Western Hemisphere. ould the gentleman have any sugges- ions as to what he believes should be one by the administration in Cuba, owever? Mr. PUCINpKI. (will as I continue Y analysis here, because actually it is o longer enough to look at Cuba alone. ur problem of Communist subversion is ernispheric. I think, as I relate here, e serious subversion and exploitation f terrorism from Cuba, we can then see ow vastly importa nit is this problem ad how large the p ?oblem is. Colombia: With Cuban support, the uerrIllas, terrorist groups, and bandits, alliance with professional Commu- ists, continue thei pattern of mur- ers and depredations. In January 1965 t e President of the Republic disclosed t e existence of a large-scale subversive ommunist plot against the government, hich was to be launahed under cover of a nationwide labor strike. The Com- unist Youth League of Colombia, a 'vie-oriented group, was implicated the plan. At the present time Corn- unlit leaders, taking advantage of Co-, mbia's political, economic, and social isis, are formulating terrorist plans and emoting violence in the hinterlands. Also, the Communist slate won easily elections 2 month; ago for members the Executive Council of the National eration of University students known FUN, the first national organization students in this country. FUN now ims to represent the students in the Government-supported universities roughout the country. Although the ajor tty of the students are not Conn- unist-oriented, FUN is in control of dent political activities. gilb9k2.t itrieffl5167En8t4s6r00500080005,-Aly ? nala: From Mexico City this Month :Daniel James reported in the Latin Anerican Times that Castroite guerilla;, formerly confined to rural area., have recently moved their opera- tions, to Guatemala City in a change of strategy designed to generate chaos and disorder there and to force Col. Enrique Pergta Azurdia, the chief of state, to fall. , Tho shift has been accompanied by reneWed r,error and violence which began a few we ,,.ks ago with the Fatal machine- gunning of the Under Secretary of De- fense Ccl. Ernesto Molina Arreaga. Also, cn June 7, bombs were hurled at the homes qf two newsmen and a Guatemalan political leader. That same night, fot r other bombs e:cploded at the embassiei; of Brazil, Costa Rica, Hon- duras, a-nd Nicaragua?all countries which have sent troops to join the Inter- American Peace Force in Santo Domingo. Honduras: In February, the authori- ties discovered a cache of weapons and subversiv,3 propaganda material and ar- rested several Communists. Shortly af- terward ii March an armed group led by _a Cuhan-trained Communist, attempted to de-Ares the El Canaveral Dam. Haiti: On July 19 Miss Virginia Prew- ett, writing in the Latin American Times, noted, tint President Duvalier has told the OAS that Castrolte infiltrators have moved against him from the Dominican Republic. She said that Duvalier for his own purposes has permitted a "smart, tough4 and experienced group of dedi- cated Communists to become entrenched in his, government." Duvalier is ill and as things atand now, any succeeding gov- ernment be in control of his Com- munist aic s. Parry: The Associated Press re- Porte early this month that the Para- guayan Government had announced that it had,crushed a Communist plot to be- gin a 4guerrilla warfare campaign and "make, Paraguay a second Cuba." The National Chief of Police told a news con- ference that "many Communist agents" had been arrested after infiltrating from Arge4na Brazil, and Chile. He also said the Communists had set up guerrilla training, cEmps on Argentine and Brazil- ian territory near the Paraguayan bor- der. Activities in other countries include: Argentin a: The Communists have at- tempted tc infiltrate some major parties and in, the elections held in mid-March of this ,year, they supported the "Peron- ista" Popular Union Party. Brazil: The establishment of the new governinent in Brazil put a halt to the spread and infiltration of communism. However, Efforts are still being made to create a state of guerrilla warfare and to unleash a campaign of terrorism. Chile: Early in 1965 the Minister of the Intericr described acts of terrorism there as very grave and attributed them to groups f nanced with foreign funds. Ecuador Early this year riots occurred in Quite at the end of a march organized by the recieration of University Students of Ecuador during which the National Palace was pelted with stones and Molo- tov cocktai:s. Shortly afterward, the au- thorities discovered a cache of weapons, explosi es and propaganda material in Approved For Releas 26, 1965 the hands of Communists linked with Cuba. Nicaragua: Last year authorities dis- covered a large-scale subversive plot, di- rected from Havana, designed to estab- lish a Communist government. Panama: In December 1964, the Gov- ernor of Colon declared that: Personnel trained in Communist China, Cuba and Russic, have attempted a coup against our democratic system and the Com- munists are tryin3 to deceive the masses in the hope of seeing Panama converted into the second American Republic under the heel of a foreign army. Peru: Toward the end of January, a typical Communist attack was launched against the U.S. military mission. And in the July 17 Latin American Times, Jay Mallin reported: Communist guerrillas in Peru, rampaging and ambushing, have served to spotlight a growing Castro-Communist threat through- out the hemisphers which for several months had been obscured by the Dominican crisis. In a dispatch to the New York Times from Lima on July 21, Juan de Onis re- ports that: President Fernando Belaunde Terry said today that Cuba and the Soviet Union were helping Communist "gangsters" bring unrest to his country. Mr. Belaunde said that in Peru, as in Vene- zuela, the Communists had adopted extrem- ist tactics of guerrilla action and terrorism "because we are making real social and eco- nomic gains, in obvious contrast to Cuba's situation." In other Latin American countries where "there is inflation and so many other prob- lems" the Communists use less drastic tac- tics, Mr. Belaunde suggested. These are some of the terrorist inci- dents which have erupted in almost every Latin American country with varying in- tensity. Many of the uprisings are fo- mented by students, always a fertile field for agitators. As one American diplomat described the current wave of leftist, Communist-inspired disorders, assas- sinations and terrorism. "Somebody is giving the whole place a shake." Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman. yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. Yes. I yield to the gentleman. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. What the gentleman is saying is that our funda- mental problem in the Western Hemis- phere is one of developing tactics to counter the political warfare that is actually taking place. Mr. PUCINSKI. That is correct. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. In years past, of course, we had the Monroe Doctrine that was availabae as our reason for keeping this particular hemisphere secure. It seems to me, if something is going to be recommended, we need to have a similar concept to that which was available for military purposes adopted so as to amend the Monroe Doc- trine in order to counter this political warfare problem we have. Would the gentleman agree w.ith that? Mr. PUCINSKI. I think the gentle- man is correct. I think President John- son's decisive action in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic certainly has brought our country and the free nations 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 juzy 2 6 (11 9 6pproved For RitiensAigmmAt gockgei7noftwom00500080005-4 -in the Western Hemisphere back into the orbit of thinking along the lines of the Monroe Doctrine. Although the OAS agreed in 1964 to defend the rights of individual member nations against aggression through sub- version, there has been no action. Yet Many of these OAS members, as I said Previously, whose countries have been Victims of Communist subversion debate the right of the United States to stop Communists from making the Dominican Republic another Cuba. A year ago to- day the members-of the OAS, with the exception of Mexico, voted to break diplo- matic and trade relations with Cuba When it was discovered and proved that the Venezuelan charges were substan- tiated. Because of the Dominican Re- public crisis an inter-American peace force is being formed. It is hoped plans for establishing a permanent peace force from the American nations will be form- alized and voted on at the foreign min- isters meeting in Rio de Janeiro. I think this is one of the high points of our de- cisive action in the Dominican Republic. I think that that action has given the OAS new courage, new meaning, new direction, and new strategy. If nothing More came out of that action than the creation of a pan-American or inter- American military peacekeeping force, we would have gone a long way toward turning back to the security of the Monroe Doctrine. Mr. DON H. CLA1:7SEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield further? Mr. PUCINSKI, Yes. I yield to the gentleman. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Does the gentleman feel that the OAS is reacting rapidly enough in -order to permit this same concept in any future uprisings? Mr. PUCINSKI. They are not acting rapidly enough, but I think that the problems I have enumerated here should give you a clue to their own problems. Our problem here is understanding that many of these South American govern- ments are not very stable because of the extent of subversion that exists in those countries. Many 61 those governments can be toppled overnight. So it is not enough for us to say that they ought to move faster. I think we Americans, first of all, have to recognize that there is a Problem. Let us stop kidding ourselves. There is a real serious problem in South America. The analysis I have presented ? here today indicates the extent of sub- version that is now going on in prac- tically every nation in South America. So what we have to do, it seems to me, is to firm up the political governments Of these South American countries and then firm up the OAS; and I think we ought to try and develop this inter- ? American peacekeeping force as quickly as possible so that these nations that want to stand with us will know that if itbere is a plot of subversion from Cuba against any one of these countries they will be able to fall back quickly on an inter-American peacekeeping force with- out suffering the possibility of losing the ? cohesiveness and continuity of their respective governments. ?This is, one of tbe problems ahead of, 11S. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. I yield. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. The gentle- man is suggesting then that through this beefing-up process we in effect are going to have to sponsor political organiza- tional information and in effect develop a political offensive where the Federal system of government, that has worked successfully in this country, can be im- plemented in those areas. But it is going to require people who understand the Federal system of government to assist In implementing this concept in those areas where the problem exists. Mr. PUCINSKI. I think the gentle- man is correct. Some of these points are covered in my statement. At the bresent time, according to the State Department, the major instrument of U.S. policy toward Cuba is a sys- tematic program of "economic denial," although this process is not likely to bring down the present regime. Infor- mation from Cuba indicates?and this is extremely important?that this eco- nomic boycott is relatively successful but cannot be completely effective unless other free world countries cease trading with Cuba,. For example, from 1963 to 1964 Japan's trade with Cuba increased 240 percent; Spain's by 300 percent. Eng- land?one of our most notable and loyal allies--has increased her exports to Cuba by 130 percent. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUtINSK/. I yield. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. It could be said that with friends like this who needs enemies? Mr. PUCINSKI. The gentleman is quite correct. Cuba is a bad economic risk for any trading nation. As early as 1963 Cuba's trade balance with bloc nations started to deteriorate with their deficit of $625 million. It was estimated that she owed the Soviet bloc more than $900 million in trade alone. In addition her debt for technical aid, arms, and so forth, is $1.5 billion to Rus- sia; $430 million to Czechoslovakia; $250 million to Poland; $85 million to Hun- gary; $70 million to Rumania, and to several countries in the Western Hemi- sphere another $165 million. In 1963 the trade balance of Cuba with Western countries was favorable in the amount of $65 million. However, this had to be used for other necessities, so Cuba is now almost with no dollar re- serve. Last year she had only $20 mil- lion in reserve and this year her finan- cial situation will be much worse. The U.S.S.R. made two loans to her of $50 million and $16 million each at the end of 1064 to cover her letters of credit with Western countries and to buy basic materials necessary to the sugar and nickel industries. At the end of 1964 Cuba had exceeded her budget for im- ports by $300 million, and the outlook for 1965 Is far worse in spite of a nor- mal sugar harvest. The biggest job ,we have ahead of us is to convince our free world allies that by trading with Cubathey are helping _ 17505 perpetuate the Communist regime of Fi- del Castro and holding the people of Cuba in a state of slavery and despera- tion. Not only that, they are financing and support Communist Propaganda and subversive activities originating in Cuba. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. I yield. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Could the gentleman tell me what the State De- partment thinks of this comment? Are they doing something about this to fol- low what the gentleman is now suggest- ing? Mr. PUCINSKI. I should like to lay these facts before the coordinate branch of the Government, the legislative branch of the Government here, this body. I should Ince to lay these facts before this body, as I am doing today on this 12th anniversary, in order to show my colleagues and the American people the full toll of letting the Communists re- main in Cuba. It is my hope we will then be able to explore the reactions from the State De- partment and the other interested agencies. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield further? Mr. PUCINSKI. Yes, I yield to the gentleman from California. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Well, the gentleman has certainly provided Mem- bers of Congress with an excellent rec- ord. My only regret is that there are not more Members on the floor to hear the gentleman. We have less than six Members on the floor, in my judgment. It is very regrettable, because I believe every Member of Congress should have heard this fine special order that the gentleman has taken the time to prepare. Could the gentleman tell me if it is possible to reveal the sources of the gen- tleman's information? Mr. PUCINSKI. Much of this infor- mation is obtained from, as I have said before, newspaper reports, reports of re- liable newspapers, published both in the United States and in South American countries. Much of this information is available from Publicly documented sources that have come to our attention In the Cuban Freedom Committee, and much of this information is made avail- able through the sources and the people who write to us, not only from Cuba but people who hear our broadcasts in other parts of South America and who have to rely in many instances upon these broad- casts sponsored by the Cuban Freedom Committee which, incidentally, is a committee made up exclusively of Amer- ican citizens, people, many of whom have never been to Cuba, although the executive director had been a teacher In Cuba before the Communists took over, as well as from informed letters which we receive from other countries in South America written by people who hear our broadcasts. MI stated earlier, our broadcasts may serve in many instances as the only source of straight reliable world news, because this is primarily all we broad- cast. We broadcast news from the world and the people of Cuba and the people of other South American countries who Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RID,P67B00446R000500080005-4 Approved Fotty\tak Aff)3ARF6RR8159P6M46R0005000800011-N\26, ea,r these broadcasts which emanate oin Miami, from Florida, and from ew Orleans, these people have learned rely on our broadcasts, because we do ot engage in propaganda, and we give t em the truth. We give them news er the wire services, the same news t at Americans and the people of all the f ee world are receiving. And these peo- e have learned to respect us for our tegrity,, and as a i esult they write in nd niost of the information that we get from these very reliable sources. I wonder, if I may, just touch on this oint because it may be of interest to e gentleman from California? The oint I was going to make was this? Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. It is of inter- t to me because I have met the worthy rgarization which the gentleman is dis- ssing and, furthermore, I have had me personal contacts with people in ese various countries of the world rough a missionary program with hich I worked for a number of years. Mr. PUCINSKI. .And, of course, the ssionaries very often are excellent in t eir analyses. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. It seems to e that the people should know more bout what is going on in these areas an the State Department. Mr. PUCINSKI. :: think the gentle- would be interested to know that t a Week ago radio Havana in a broad- t to Latin America?the gentleman skecl me how we get this information? s d: We wish to inform you that starting July we will increase the number of frequencies rough which we broadcast in Spanish to atm n America, North A.merlea. ,and Central eri6a. Desides the normal frequencies u will be able to hear us on 25, 16, and 7 egacycles." On July 21, Ramiro Puertas, Director the Cuban Institute of Radio, an- ounced over ClVIQ Havana, that this ar the Institute will install a 150,000- att station in Havana and another of e same power in San German, Oriente; o other 60,000-watt stations in Carn- ey and Oriente Provinces for radio ebelde network. On July 26, another ,000-watt station will be inaugurated Guantanamo. still another 60,000- att station will be built in Cacocum, riente, for radio Progreso network, latch, will have an additional 5,000-watt ation in Baracoa. Also, they are installing French TV uipment to improve reception between aguey, Guaimaro; and Victoria de s Tunas. It is important to know that s :is French equ.:pment--equipment lug supplied to Communist Cuba by r supposed ally, France. To show Cuba's importance to the mrnunists' dream of world domina- n, I will read you another news dis- tch : The French Press Agency reported from iro on July 16 that the Cuban Ambassador Egypt, before leavini; for home, had an- uncod that a conference of popular move- ents of three continents will be held in H. vans on January 6, 1466. It had been de- ci?ed at the Fourth Afro-Asian Solidarity C nference in Accra in May '5o extend the vereent to Latin America. Representa- es of popular movements of six Latin American ountries will participate in the prelimihary planning meetings which will begin ih Csiro on September 1. The coun- tries are: Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela, Uruguay, Chile, and Guatemala. The planning com- mittees als3 will includes delegates of Jive African ccsmtries: Egypt, Algiers, Morocco, Guinea. Sodtb Africa, and six Asian coun- tries?he 3eople's Republic of China, the U.S.S.R., India, Indonesia, Jaren, and South Vietnaih. There s ou have it, Mr. Speaker, in the bold, broad strokes of Communist takeover mder our very noses. Two years ago ihe United States seemed to be at least it some measure awake to the Cuban danger. Today, I fear we are let- ing the immediate and close-to-home problem tike a secondary position in our planning and our defense. Mr. Speaker, I affirm t) this House that in such a course lies hemispheric disaster. FREENVHEIELING DISARMAMENT BIN(IE :0-DANGER8 NATIONAL SE- CURITY The SP:LAKER pro tempore. Under previoUs oder of the House, the gentle- man from California [Mr. Hosamil is recognized for 40 minutes. Mr. HOSMER. Mr. Speaker, disarma- ment fervar runs high in Washington today. Tie Arms Control and Disarma- ment Ager cy's?ACDA?budget has bal- looned several hundred percent since its inception n 1961. Friends of Disarma- ment Iron intellectual and academic circles! in large numbers have enlisted voluntariliy in the cause. Prof. Jerome Wiesner, the former White House sci- ence advis er, recommends developing "a cadre of people whose full-time occupa- tion" is to reorient public attitudes. He wants them "to create a vested interest in amp ontrol"?whatever that may mean. ; Unles forces in the United States who recognize the danger of unrestrained dis- armament quickly organize and articu- late their position, the administration's cadre of c.edicated disarmers soon will take the Nation Past the point of no re- turn on its flight from the proven strat- egy of arming to avoid trouble to the yet unproven :,trategy of disarming to avoid it. . DISARMERS worm QUIETLY AND EFFECTIVELY The disarmers carry on their work un- obtrusiyely. . As yet the public is not conditipned to disarmament. The ma- jority of Americans still believes world peace as well as national survival de- pends on s rength coupled with negotia- tion rather than negotiation alone. The average person is scared half out of his wits when some enterprising writer digs out and Publicizes facts on various ACDA-sponsored disarmament studies. This alas the case when things came to light as lhe study on togetherness with Russia and its study suggesting self -un- posed limitations on intelligence gather- ing efforts. The Wor c of Washington's disarmers is being' made easier by the seemingly cal- culated elimination of top military spokesmen capable of comunicating au- thoritatively with the American public. Such popular figures as Admiral Arleigh 1965 "31 Knot" Burke and cigar-chomping Gen. Curtis LeMay are on the retired rolls. No successors have been permitted to develop public prominence. Probably not one person in a thousand can even name our present Chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A tribute to the steady progress of the disarmers came recently in the form of a lack of outcry when a U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., the late Adlai Stevenson, promised a further softening of the American position on test ban treaty safeguards. When negotiations for a comprehensive treaty broke off in 1963. U.S. demands for annual inspections in Soviet territory had been whittled from 20 to 7. Khrushchey still adamantly maintained "three or four" would be ample. Stevenson promised that the Johnson administration now "is willing to explore" further what constitutes "an adequate inspection system." Public apathy toward the possible con- sequences of the promise has encouraged and accelerated preparation of many other advanced disarmament positions, some of which President Johnson is ex- pected to offer the Soviets when the 18- nation Disarmament Conference recon- venes in Geneva tc morrow. These include: NIMAILATER9L NUCLEAR UMBRELLA This proposal calls for pledges by nuclear have-not nations to refrain from seeking nuclear capabilities in exchange for pledges from the U.N.'s nuclear "haves" to aid them if they fall victim to atomic aggression. Whether the occur- rence, of "aggression" is to be determined by the U.N.'s frequently paralyzed Gen- eral Assembly, its veto-ridden Security Council, the nonnuclear victim or the nuclear pledgegiver is uncertain. TOTAL TEST BAN TREATY This proposal to enlarge the present limited test ban treaty to include a bar against tests underground as well as in other environments would be based on "splitting the difference" between United States and U.S.S.R. inspection demands and fixing the number at five annually. Professor Wiesner and ACDA believe "five inspections per year will provide adequate security against clandestine nuclear testing." However, hearings of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy cast considerable doubt on this optimistic assessment. Additionally, they raised monumental doubts whether even un- limited opporturities for inspection could penetrate the precautions of a determined cheater. This is because the Soviets insist on severe limitations on factors affecting the quality as well as the quantity of inspections. These in- clude tight restrictions on size and com- position of inspection teams, allowable Inspection techniques, permissible equip- ment, mode and freedom of travel and communications, length of the inspection period and the like. DESTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS Several years ago the disarmament concept of "we'll burn our bombers and you burn yours" was seriously con- sidered. Its current adaptation is ex- pected to take the form of a proposal that the United States and U.S.S.R, junk Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 july 6, 1965 i iails and dimensions of the hoasing problem In the /station's' Capital." Existing data is stale, incomplete, and in- adequate," Sheppard said. "Almost every- One living in Washington is aware generally hat we e confronted with a housing prob- em whi h is growing more serious day by ay. Bt now we want the facts. The un- $rnishei and whole truth will give us a tealistic basis to solve the prcblem. "Now the citizens living the these areas ave vol nteered to go out personally, inter- view th Ir neighbors and then collect the informa ion which will help us define our loals an strategies. What ws need now is More de ent, safe housing that low-income people c n afford. "This s a burning issue with us._ We feel that poo housing is one of the strongest con- tributin causes of poverty," he said. The c wale is being 'conducted in three eighbo ,00ds in the Cardozo area of North- west ,W'ashington; in the neighborhood around endship House, 619 G Street SE.; n the n ighborhood around Southeast House across t e Anacostia River, 22a3 Mount View Place SE., and in two areas in the Northeast. One i In the near Northeast, bounded ir New York Avenue, Mount Olivet Road, M Street, and. the Anacostia River. Another ft in the far allortheast,bounded on two sides , y the rine', Georges County line, and by t ort Duo nt Road and the Anacostia River, nd a third in urban renewal area Northwest No. 1 around Union Station. A five-page ,survey form includes ques- tions on the number of people living in a dwelling theft income, rent, and mortgage tchedul . Interviewers will seek informa- ion fro renters about landlord-tenant re- tk,tionsh ps, lease patterns and eviction problem. They 1 pinpoint the actual physical con- ditions f each dwelling unit, sanitary con- ditions, he state of repair or disrepair, heat- ng fac ities, and trash and garbage col- lection s rvice. Interv ewers have been organized into area eams b the neighborhood advisory councils. Data athered will be tallied from August li-7. A report will be issued to the com- rnunity August 8. This is expected to be r'ollowed by an action program based on the aecomm ndations. , if From t e Washington (D.C.) Evening Star, July 20, 1965] Co PLIANCE ON REPAIRS IS OFTEN Loam DELAYED Both andlord and tenant complain about the lack of a clear standard for enforcement. The la dlord. says different inspectors use differertl criteria for spotting 'violations, and the ten nts complain that the lack of qual- lty control permits landlords to use cheap rnateria in repairs. The code specified only - that a 'workmanlike" job be done. ! Neigh orhood workers attempting to help SIUM d elm with their housing problems ave be n annoyed by the housing division's licy o allowing only landlords and tenants o see iolations records. - Mallon said he as ma ing an exception to his rule when reporter , after filling out detailed forms re- quiring both Mallon's and the Corporation Counsel's signatures, were permitted to see the reco. ds. i All the division's records are filed by street address. There is no-central :Me_ listing vio- Iators by name. The inspectors become fa- n-tiller with habitual offender., but there is no easy itvay to determine any owner's entire history 4f code violations. But nostly it ft the long delays and the onstan threat- of retaliating evictions that rustrat slum dwellers seeking to get re- airs in their homes. And perhaps it is the elays that have led to the suspicion by the 'tenants that inspectors can be bought off by Ilandlor s. I . APPr"tcgatAVREVE-0 6169LAIRM00446R000500080005-4 17501 One real estate 'man said that years ago, owners and agents always Provided the in- spectors with generous Christmas gifts. "We all used to lo it," he said, "but then one time an 'nape ctor came by to get his gift, and I sivar his car was packed full of whisky so I cutit att." The agent lid he now occasionally will ask an Inspect dr to come by one of his prop- erties to advise him about repairs that will be necessary ta maet the code. "I' usually give them $5 Or $10 for the favor," he said, "but I've only dor e this a couple of dozen times in the peat 25 years." S. Tudor Sta-anf , deputy superintendent of the housing dit ision, said: "If we knew the point where slum landlords will leave the market and ba replaced by people not interested in explciting tenants. But step- ped-up enforcement as Mallon points out, would require conaiderably more inspectors. Several weeks au?, District Commissioner Walter N. Tobrinet suggested what he calls a "reformulation" of the code. He agrees with many sluna Loadlords?that the minor aspects of the: code should not be empha- sized. Tobriner fears I hat with strict enforce- ment and lowcir profits "the landlord, either evicts the tenants, rehabilitates the prop- erty and rentii to high income groups, or evicts the tenants razes the building and converts the land ao some other use."' "There is a dilemma," Tobriner said. Tough enforceanen t could have the unin- tended effect of rec.ucing the housing supply rather than iraprcving housing conditions. Still other cdnaplaints about slum housing center on the Landlord and Tenant Court. Cases handled athe a last year ardounted to more than 96,000 and Chief Judge John Lewis Smith, Jr., estImaies the figure will exceed 100,000 this year. The proceedings in the court are summary, usually withoUt eaterisive argument. More than 95 percent of the cases in the court deal with nonpayir ant of rent while most of the others involve dousing code violations. In the nonpaym ant cases, Smith said, if the tenant admits having not paid the rent, the only judgrnent possible will be in favor of the landlord. The law does not give the tenant the right .* withhold his rent be- cause his landlord has failed to make repairs or improvements, Smith said. The wording of the law and the role of the judges in, eniorcing the law have led slum dwellers to complain that the court is merely a Collection agency for landlords. Civil rights erga aizations and antipoverty officials in Washington are now seeking changes in the law, but Smith said that what- ever reforms are made must come through legislation or appolate court decisions, net from the Landlord and Tenant Court. [From the WaahinIton (D.C.) Post, auly 14, ; 1965] POTOMAC WATOH--..75ITY'S HOUSING SHORTAGE THE TARGET? FRUSTRATION THE THEME AT DISCUSSION (By George Lardner Jr.) Frustration area the theme. The city's shOrta le of low-cost housing was the target. The audience sounded aroused. But the members of more than 25 housing organizations, Civil rights groups, and pub- lic agencies who gathered to try to "do some- thing" about he housing crisis seemed to realize they Were punching futilely at the same old paper bra of exorbitant rents, dilapidated homes slumlords, and the bu- reaucratic delays facing almost any attempt at improvement. "We seem ta be moving backwards," said Stephen J. P011ala president-elect of the Washington Planning and Housing Associa- tion which called tae meeting. "A tent on the Mall would be an enor- mous tmprove1nent for more people than I care to think of," said Harris Weinstein, the association's housing committee chairman. The District of Columbia Coalition of Conscience has been trying to put up a tent for a family of 13?with two working mothers?who were evicted last month, but can't find new quarters. The emergency housing program the city loudly promised in May for predicaments like this may take another 3 months to get started, ac- cording to city officials Who are not accus- tomed to rushing. Forty-five real estate agents and nine pub- lic and private agencies had been called, said Coalition Co-Chairman Walter E. Fauntroy, but none could come up with a single unit that the family could afford The tent, of course, ft a gimmick?but an appropriate one. As Mr. Fauntroy said, "we have to create pressure to affect the cures." One WPHA worker who helps families in the Cardozo area told of an eight-room house worth $17,600 that produces gross rentals of $600 a month for its owner. The worker, Tom Firor, also told of an- other landlord who "for the 40th time in the last 6 months has evicted or threatened to evict families because they called the city's Housing Division" to get. needed repairs ordered. Another WPHA worker, Belvie Rooks, broke into tears when she described how her organization had to pay $300 a month in back rent to "one of the worst slumlords in the city" to save a mother of seven from evic- tion from a house with broken-down plumb- ing and inadequate heating. The family, Miss Rooks said, had beer. living there for 3 years when the old owner died. Suddenly, she said, the rent went up from $50 a month with utilities to $100 a month?without utili- ties. The audience had plenty of suggestions? ranging from rent controls, to tougher en- forcement of the housing code to easing the housing code's restrictions against over- crowding. Mr. Fauntroy suggested that citizens' or- ganizations start scouring the suburbs for sites?a suggestion that should we well 'worth pursuing under the administration's rent subsidy program before Congress. He pro- posed that "we move into the surrounding area and, if necessary, purchase land to re- lieve the (city's housing) need." But no one followed through with the thought. Despite the suggestions, the meet- ing reflected, primarily, a feeling of exas- peration at all the years gone by without any substantial progress. "What we called victories really just switched people around the slums," said Lillian Secundy of the Washington Urban League. The WPHA had drafted a statement calling for more low-income housing in the city and action on several long-stalled projects, but the audience didn't bather to endorse it. "Pious paragraphs," said one speaker. "Too wishy-washy," said another. Pollak agreed, but added: "I'm wonder- ing what we can do." He suggested develop- ment of a "plan of action" backed by a fed- eration of all interested organizations. But no one could do anything right away. They've got their boards of directors to check with. Everyone, it seems, is saddled with his own bureaucracy--which brings us back to the District Building. District Commissioner Walter N. Toloriner has suggested "an emergency in low-cost housing" might be declared?so the Com- missioners could temporarily lift relatively minor housing code requirements in run- down neighborhoods. The suggestion was sincerely made, but it hardly seems an adequate response 'to an emergency. If it had any noticeable effect, It would probably benefit the landlords more Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Releatgennibiat-MR38044ENI00080005-4 than the tenants; and promote slums rather than decent housing. If the Commissioners can agree there's an "emergency"--and there is?perhaps they might fry promoting some one- or two-block urban renewal projects?for public housing. It migh.t not work-, but ft seems worth the at- tempt. It'll take a while to get to the anburbs. [From the Washington (D.C.) Evening Star, ? July 15, 1965] NEW GROUP TO PUSH LOW INCOME Irons'No (By Benjamin Forgey) An informal District organization calling itself the Ad HoC, Committee on the Housing Crisis was formed last night to seek an in- crease in low-income housing. Representatives of about 20 housing, civil rights, labor, political, welfare and church organizations endorsed the program, but left the exact nature of the new group in doubt as they returned to report to their own organizations. Harris Weinstein, chairman of the housing committee of the Washington Planning and Housing Association, said he hoped action on some Of the proposals would begin this week. The most "immediate and substantial need." Weinstein told the group, was to lobby for bairced residential use of the Ana,costia- Bolling an Earional Vali:ring School sites. Competing proposals for use of these tracts, the last large, aVailable publicly owned sites in the District, are being discussed in Congress. The group also voted to urge the District C ,ornmtssioners, to use "whatever powers they now have" to make repairs on Slum prop- erties and charge the repairs to landlords. According to the resolution, the Commis- sioners will also be asked to seek legislation Preventing "retaliatory" evictions and rent increases. ? Also proposed was a "housing crisis week- end.", during which clergymen will focus their sermons on the 4eecl, for,low-income housing and a tour of the District's slums for inter- ested Public officials. ? The meeting was the result of a WPHA effort to "bring, the housing, needs of the District before, te public," and was a follow- up an Initial session held last Thursday. P2GVEIGN POCICY MISMANAGEMENT (Mx. DERVTINSKI (at the request of Mr. DoN H. CLAUSEN) was granted per- mission to extend his remarks at this point in the ECORD and to include ex- traneous matter.) Mr, DERWIIIIKSHI. Mr. Speaker, the continued detArioration of our conduct of foreign affairs is seen in many parts of the world. liowever, the spineless handling of the Nasser administration in Egypt certainly is fully indicative of for- eign policy mismanagement. When are we going to wake up and realize that we are being taken for a ride? Egypt is doing a good job of mak- ing a fool out of the United States. Less than a month ago, Egypt's Nasser took a full advantage of American willingness to hand out free wheat, Now, we find out that the Agency for International Development gave Egypt over 23 million Clollarp' worth: of corn, in 1961 on the - basis Of an Out and, out misrepresenta- tion. My distinguished colleague, the gen- tleman from Minnesota [Mr. LANcErth qiIed atteption to the report of the Cleneral Accounting Office ;that a ship- ment of 186,060 metric tons of corn to Egypt under the auspices of AID was ob- tained under false pretenses. The grant was made on the basis of reports from. the Cromrnunist-sympathizing country of a potential famine because of a serious crop failure. It was later disclosed that no crop failure occurred and much of the corn had been sold by Egypt. The gentleman from Minnesota [Mr. LANGEN] further disclosed that AID of- ficials found out Egypt was selling some of the corn even before the whole grant was shipped. With over $11 million worth still in the hands of U.S. officials, AID apparently made no attempt to hold the shipments until the matter could be investigated. The GAO report charged that AID did not check on distribution of over 85 percent of the corn, and it has been substantiated that at least 80,000 tons have been sold by the Egyptian Government. This report confirms what I have been saying for years. The administration will spend taxpayers' dollars to give aid to any country which stretches out its hand. I want to commend the General Accounting Office on its alertness. I hope this report opens some eyes in Washing- ton. If it does not, it seems we will con- tinue to help a country that openly de- grades the United States and is critical of our policy. What is needed is action by the Con- gress to insure that any future grants would be made only when it is assured that all the aid goes for the purpose for which it was intended. Apparently, the Agency for International Development does not do this now. As a member of the House Foreign Af- fairs Committee which has been duti- fully rubberstamping administration measures for years, I would hope that the committee would recognize its legis- lative responsibilities and concentrate on implementation of a foreign policy whereby we would reject the blackmail pressures from rulers such as Nasser. Na:sser is -using anti-Israel statements as a'` smokescreen for his domestic fail- ures, and there is no reason why we should prop up his administration, which is carrying on an aggressive military ac- tion against the legitimate government and people of Yemen. (Mr. BURTON of Utah (at the re- quest of Mr. DoN H. CLAusEN) was granted permission to extend his re- marks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous matter.) [Mr. BURTON of Utah's remarks will appear hereafter in the Appendix.] (Mr. BURTON of Utah (at the request of Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN) was granted permission to extend his remarks at this point in the RECORD and to include ex- traneous matter.) [Mr. BURTON of Utah's remarks will appear hereafter in the Appendix.] MEMBERS OF THE JOINT COMMIS- SION ON THE COINAGE The SPEAKETt. PurSualit to the pro.: visions of Public Law 89-81, the Chair appoints as members of the Joint Com- mission on the Coinage the following July 26, 1965 Members on the part of the House: Messrs. EDMONDSON, GrArmo, CorrrE, and BATTIN. FURTHER MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE A further message from the Senate by Mr. Arrington, one of its clerks, an- nounced that the Senate agrees to the report of the committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 2984) entitled "An act to amend the Public Health Service Act provisions for construction of health re- search facilities by extending the expira- tion date thereof and providing increased support for the program, to authorize additional assistant secretaries in the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and for other purposes." The message also announced that the Senate agrees to the report of the com- mittee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amend- ments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 2985) entitled "An act to authorize as- sistance in meeting the initial cost of professional and technical personnel for comprehensive community mental health centers." The message also announced that the Senate agrees to the report of the com- mittee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amend- ments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 7984) entitled "An act to assist in the provision of housing for low- and mod- erate-income families, to promote or- derly urban development, to improve living environment in urban areas, and to extend and amend laws relating to housing, urban renewal, and community facilities." The message also announced that the Senate agrees to the report of the com- mittee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amend- ments of the House to the bill (S. 510) entitled "An act to extend and other- wise amend certain expiring provisions of the Public Health Service Act relating to community health s ees,:and for other purposes." 6_6_63 / TWELFTH ANNIVERSARY OF COM- MUNIST CONQUEST OF CUBA POSES A THREAT TO AMERICA AS GREAT AS THE THREAT IN VIETNAM The SPEAKER. Under previous or- der of the House, the gentleman from Illinois [Mr. PucirrsEr] is recognized for 60 minutes. (Mr. PUCINSKI asked and was given permission to revise and extend his re- marks and to include extraneous mat- ter.) Mr. PUCINSKI. Mr. Speaker, 12 years ago today Fidel Castro and his brother, Raul, with 101 others overran the Moncada Army Barracks in Cuba. This was the heginnin.g of Castro's war to overthrow 13astista, It was the be- ginning of Castro's betrayal of the Cu- ban people by permitting the Soviets to establish the first Communist regime in Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 7y , 1965 Approved Fortidgeg 000500080005-4 26 A itTediESEENtiff the Western Hemisphere. This daylis now celebrated by the Communists as the 26th of July movement. Two 'Years itgo Metn15ers on both sides Of this aisle loIned in -presenting to the House a serieS'olf addresses eibout a plan "to fight the cold Waf and to win back Cuba for democracy:" Today, 2 years later, here we are on dead center. We face the same prob- lem: "What to do about Cuba?" For the record, let us review the situa- tion in that beledguered Island only 90 miles from the eastern coastline of the United States. Cuba, once a prosperous country; with one of the highest standards of living in Latin America, has been reduced to a primitive society. There is no freedom of the individual, no free press or radio. Letters received by Free Cuba Radio from Cuba tell of hunger, insufficient clothing, few daily necessities?the paralysis of much industry. Marxism dominates school curriculum from the nursery up 'through university level. The army is soviet trained and the peo- ple are terrorized by informers in the so-called defense committees. Even the children are forced to spy on their parents. Conservatively, 80,000 Cuban men and women are now in jail, forced to live under indescribable conditions. Daily executions are Comrhonplace. Despite a good sugar harvest this year, the economy is at roCk bottom. Castro has few dolars for exchange. Diseases have reached epidemic proportions among both people and livestock. Medi- cines and qualified doctors are scarce, health measures deplorable. Child mor- ? tality continues to mount. Out of a population of approximately 7 million, 500,000 have left the country. It is es- timated that 230,000 Cubans hold pass- pelts and visas and are eager to leave. !ore than 400,000 others have filled out request forms. It is reported that from 85 to 90 percent of the people in Cuba are against the ComMunist regime. How and why then do the Communists stay in power? The answer is that with 500,008 men and women under arms and with a highly trained secret police, the G-2, the Cuban people live in constant terror and under suppression of these spies and guns. Castro's aim was not to free the Cuban people from Batista's dictatorship. His whole design was to create an arsenal and launching pad for Communist sub- version to carry on their "wars of libera- tion" in Latin America. The New York Times in a, recent editorial, put it this way: The wars of liberation are aimed primarily against the United States. Anywhere in the non-Communist world, a gain for the East is a loss for the West and the United States is the major power in the free world. :,VoT the past 2 years there has been OmPartitiVely little' talk about Cuba. Vietnam has crowded Havana from the Vont pages. Many well-meaning Amer- icans have been lulled to complacency by the coexistence line and that Cuba is no threat to the United States. In the Tnear4ime, egramurilst propaganda and 0.1061-0 subversion emanating from the Cuban launching pad are defeating our foreign Policy. On March 10 Hewson A. Ryan, associate director for policy and plans of the U.S. Information Service, before a Senate Committee, pointed out the direc- tion the propaganda of the Communist nations is taking: Communist propaganda strategy for Latin America is directed toward the destruction of U.S. power and influence in the area and ultimately to the imposition of Marxist- Leninist regimes throughout the hemisphere. In a Pravda editorial of January 14, 1965, and in the subsequent communique on the Havana meeting of Latin American Commu- nist Parties, Moscow has made it clear that in Latin America it will use "all forms of struggle, both peaceful and nonpeaceful" to further the goals of international commu- nism. While the U.S.S.R., Red China, and Cuba differ little on their ultimate aims in Latin America, their short-term propaganda strategy and tactics do vary somewhat. The major themes in Cuban propaganda are "independence from Yankee imperialism" and the "advantages of a Socialist economy." To carry on their propaganda activities in Latin America the Communists utilize in varying degrees all the modern communica- tions media. Radio Havana is broadcasting 125 hours weekly in Spanish, 14 hours in Creole for Haiti, '7 hours each in Portuguese and English, an hour and 20 minutes in Guarani for Paraguay, and 30 minutes in Aymara. Cuba's Spanish service includes a regular program for Venezuela, which has been used by members of the Venezuelan Armed Forces of National Liberation exiled In Cuba to broadcast direct appeals for in- surrection against the Venezuelan Govern- ment. Turncoats from Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Peru, and Dominican Republic broadcast frequently to their respective home countries from Cuba, also. The Cuban serv- ice even includes a weekly half hour program entitled "The Voice of Free Dixie" and is directed to the American Negro population. Although not generally known until Pravda reported it on January 14 of this year, Central and South American Com- munist Party leaders, together with Moscow agents and Castro, and his aides, met in Havana in late November 1964, to plan their combined strategy for further subverting Latin America. The report of the Special Consultative Committee on Security of the Pan American Union?April 12-May 7, 1965? derived the following conclusions from the conference of the Communists: That, for the present, Cuba agrees to con- tinue to follow Moscow's lead. That the Castro regime will continue to serve as the principle tool of communism for the subversion of the Americas. That an increase of Communist subversive activities in the Americas is to be expected. At that meeting, they selected as their prime target for subversion, in a virtual declaration of war, Venezuela, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, and Haiti. They omitted the Dominican Re- public, their pilot project, for which battle plans already had been drawn. Arso, in the early part of March 1965, a world conference of representatives of Communist Parties was held in Moscow. Representatives of 19 countries partici- pated, including those of old Communist Parties of Argentina and Brazil and the new United Socialist Revolutionary Party 17503 of Cuba, as the sole representative of Latin America. This shows the impor- tance that Moscow attributes to the Cuban party in world conference. Now, Mr. Speaker, let us look at the Implementation of these principles. First, we all know what took place in Santo Domingo. On June 13 Jeremiah O'Leary, Latin American writer for the Washington Star capsuled a report from an official U.S. paw compiled b intern- g_ence sources, expert in Commun The report, chronologically and in narrative form, describes the day-by-day activities in Santo Domingo between April 24 and May 5 of 77 known Commu- nists. Many of the 77 were previously identified as participants in the revolt by U.S. Government sources on May 6, but the new document gives intimate details of their participation before and after the American intervention. The document discloses that at least 45 of the extremists had been deported from the Dominican Republic a year before and that most of them had re- ceived guerrilla warfare training in Cuba before they began drifting back into the Dominican Republic last Octo- ber. Cuba's principal agency for pro- moting revolutionary activities in Latin America, the General Directorate of Intelligence?DGI?had for some time been providing financial support to two of the three Dominican Communist parties?the 14th of June Political Group?APCJI---and the Dominican Pop- ular Movement?MPD. The other Dominican Communist group which co- operated in the rebellion is the Domini- can Popular Socialist?PSPD?party which follows the Moscow line. The revolt may have been started by some dissident army officers, but the Communist leaders of all three parties issued orders to their members to incite the civilian crowds gathering in the streets, and to stage rallies and demon- strations. We all have read of the vio- lence, wanton damage and loss of life that ensued. It is interesting that the Cuban DGI officer who handles revolutionary opera- tions for the Dominican Republic is Roberto Santiesteban Casanova, de- ported by the United States for engaging in espionage in 1962 while serving with the Cuban delegation to the United Nations. Time is too short to present further evidence but let us review what has been happening in Latin America since the November meeting of the Latin Ameri- can Communists. Venezuela: According to a report issued by the Special Consultative Com- mittee on Security of the Pan American Union on May 7: Communist activities, which have been on the wane at the end of 1964, have broken out again and may be expected to increase with the assistance that Cuba has promised to continue to provide to the Armed Forces of National Liberation. Cuba is also continuing to provide considerable amounts of money to sup- port subversion in Venezuela. Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 17504 Approved For let.M. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, 'will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. I yield to the gen- tleman. 110. DON izt. CLAUSEN. I compliment the gentleman on his very provocative statement. I would also ask the gentle- man if the very tactics that are now being used in Latin America are not es- sentially the same as have been carried out by the Vietcong in Vietnam. Mr. PUCINSKI. They are the very same tactics. That is why I think this 12th anniversary is of more than pass- ing interest to the American people. There has beeratoo little said about what has been happening in Cuba. There are those who, for instance, criticized our own Government :!or taking strong ac- tion in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. The fact of the matter is we have now recorded indisputable proof of Communist exploitation of subversion which Castro has been engaging in was te be tried in Santo Domingo. We can all, as Americans, regardless of what our party affiliations may be, thank the good Lord that we have a President who moved decisively to stop this coup in Santo Domingo. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. I would agree completely with the gentleman, and I am not a member of either the gentleman's party or the Pres:ideat's party. I am convinced in my own mind that had we net taken this quick and decisive action, We certainly would have had another Cuba in this Western Hemisphere. Would the gentleman have any sugges- tions as to what he believes should be done by the administration in Cuba, however? PUCINSKI. I will as I continue my analysis here, because actually it is no longer enough to look at Cuba alone. Our problem of Conununist subversion is hemispheric. I think, as I relate here, the serious subversion and exploitation of terrorism from Cuba, we can then see ? how vastly important is this problem and how large the problem is. Colombia: With Cuban support, the guerrillas, terrorist groups, and bandits, in alliance with rrofessional Commu- nists, continue their pattern of mur- ders and depredaticns. In January 1965 the President of the Republic disclosed the existence of a large-scale subversive Commuaist plot against the government, which was to be launched under cover of nationwide labor strike. The Corn- Unist Youth League of Colombia, a Soviet-oriented group, was implicated n the plan. At the present time Corn- unist leaders, taking advantage of Co- ombia's political, economic, and social risis, are formulating terrorist plans and romoting violence in the hinterlands. Also, the Communist slate won easily n elections 2 months ago for members f the Executive Council of the National ederation of Univeasity students known FUN, the first national organization f students in this country. FUN now laints to represent the students in the 5 Government-supported universities hroughout the country. Although the ajcalty of the students are not Corn- unist-oriented, FUN is in control of tudent political a,cavities. ?giiwit:la-ljil?.17)6_7Bp.paitg000500080005-4 July 26 1965 Gpatemala: From Mexico City this mouth Daniel James reported in the Latin imerican Times that Castroite gueqillas, formerly confined to rural areas, have recently moved their opera- tion to Guatemala City in a change of strategy designed to generate chaos and disoccier there and to force Col. Enrique Peralta Azurdia, the chief of state, to fall. The shift has been accompanied by renewed terror and violence which began a few weeks ago with the fatal machine- gunaing of the Under Secretary of De- fense, Col. Ernesto Molina Arreaga. Also, on June 7, bombs were hurled at the acmes of two newsmen and a Gua ;ern ilan political leader. That same night four other bombs exploded at the embassies of Brazil, Costa Rica, Hon- duras ,tad Nicaragua--all countries whieh have sent troops to join the Inter- American Peace Force in Santo Domingo. ties iSe3vered a cache of weapons and Ilnduras: In February, the authori- ties subverst re propaganda material and ar- rested several Communists. Shortly af- terward in March an armed group led by a Cuban-trained Communist, attempted to destrc y the El Canaveral Darn. Haiti: On July 19 Miss Virginia Prew- ett, Ivriting in the Latin American Times, noted ti at President Duvalier has told the OAS that Castroite infiltrators have moved against him from the Dominican Republic. She said that Duvalier for his own purposes has permitted a "smart, tough, and experienced group of dedi- cated Coaununists to become entrenched In his gc vernrnent." Duvalier is ill and as th ngs stand now, any succeeding gov- ernment will be in control of his Com- munist a ds. PaTaguay: The Associated Press re- ported early this month that the Para- guayan Government had announced that It ha crushed a Communist plot to be- gin gt errilla warfare campaign and "male Paraguay a second Cuba." The National Chief of Police told a news con- ference that "many Communist agents" had teen arrested after infiltrating from Arge tin a Brazil, and Chile. He also said tbe Communists had set up guerrilla training i amps on Argentine and Brazil- ian territory near the Paraguayan bor- der. , Activit es in other countries include: Argentite: The Communists have at- tempted ,o infiltrate some major parties and ih the elections held in mid-March of thi year, they supported the "Peron- ista" t3op liar Union Party. Brazil: The establishment of the new goverhment in Brazil put a halt to the spreall and infiltration of communism. Howeirer, efforts are still being made to create a state of guerrilla warfare and th unkasli a campaign of terrorism. ChAe: Early in 1965 the Minister of the Interior described acts of terrorism there as very grave and attributed them to groups financed with foreign funds. in Ectiador: Early this year riots occurred n Qu to itt the end of a march organized by the Federation of University Students of Eduader during which the National Palace wes pelted with stones and Molo- tov cocktails. Shortly afterward, the au- thoritps discovered a cache of weapons, exploo'ves and propaganda material in Approved For Release the hands of Communists linked with Cuba. Nicaragua: Last year authorities dis- covered a large-scale subversive plot, di- rected from Havana, designed to estab- lish a Communist government. Panama: In December 1964, the Gov- ernor of Colon declared that: Personnel trained in Communist China, Cuba and Russia have attempted a coup against our democratic system and the Com- munists are trying to deceive the masses in the hope of seeing Panama converted into the second American Republic under the heel of a foreign army. Peru: Toward the end of January, a typical Communist attack was launched against the U.S. military mission. And in the July 17 Latin American Times, Jay Mallin repo:rted: Communist guerrillas in Peru, rampaging and ambushing, have served to spotlight a growing Castro-C'ornmunist threat through- out the hemisphere which for several months had been obscured by the Dominican crisis. In a dispatch to the New York Times from Lima on July 21, Juan de Onis re- ports that: President Fernando Belaunde Terry said today that Cuba and the Soviet Union were helping Communist "gangsters" bring unrest to his country. . Mr. Belaunde said that in Peru, as in Vene- zuela, the Communists had adopted extrem- ist tactics of guerrilla action and terrorism "because we are making real social and eco- nomic gains, in obvious contrast to Cuba's situation." In other Latin American countries where "there is inflation and so many other prob- lems," the Communists use less drastic tac- tics, Mr. Belaunde suggested. These are some of the terrorist inci- dents which have erupted in almost every Latin American country with varying in- tensity. Many of the uprisings are fo- mented by students, always a fertile field for agitators. As one American diplomat described the current wave of leftist, Communist-inspired disorders, assas- sinations and terrorism. "Somebody is giving the whole place a shake." Mr. 'DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. Yes. I yield to the gentleman. Mr. DON H. 'CLAUSEN., What the gentleman is sa?ying is that our funda- mental problem in the Western Hemis- phere is one of developing tactics to counter the political warfare that is actually taking place. Mr. PUCINSK:C. That is correct. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. In years past, of course, we had the Monroe Doctrine that was available as our reason for keeping this particular hemisphere secure. It seems to me, if something is going to be recommended, we need to have a similar aoncept to that which was available for military purposes adopted so as to amend the Monroe Doc- trine in order to counter this political warfare problem we have. Would the gentleman agree with that? Mr. PUCINSKI. I think the gentle- man is correct. :[ think President John- son's decisive action in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic certainly has brought our country and the free nations 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDPd7B00446R000500080005-4 :July 2 6 , 9 6 pproved For Iteerm21003n61: M30713996611000500080005-4 17505 in the Western Hemisphere back into the orbit of thinking along the lines of the Monroe Doctrine. Although the OAS agreed in 1964 to defend the rights of individual member nations against aggression through sub- version, there has been no action. Yet many of these OAS Members, as I said previously, whose countries have been victims of Communist subversion debate the right of the United States to stop Communists from making the Dominican Republic another Cuba. A year ago to- day the members of the OAS, with the exception of Mexico, voted to break d:plo- matte and trade relations with Cuba when it was discovered and proved that the Venezuelan charges were substan- tiated. Because of the Dominican Re- public crisis an inter-American peace force is being formed. It is hoped plans for establishing a permanent peace force from the American nations will be form- &Ind and yoted on at the foreign min- isters meeting in Rio de Janeiro. I think this is one of the high points of our de- cisive action in the Dominican Republic. I think that that action has given the OAS new courage, new meaning, new direction, and new strategy. If nothing more came Out of that action than the creation of a pan-American or inter- American military peacekeeping force, we would have gone a long way toward turning back to the security of the Monroe Doctrine. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, Will the gentleman yield further? Mr. PUCE1/41SKI. Yes. I yield to the gentleman.- - Mr, DON H. CLAUSEN. Does the gentleman feel that the OAS is reacting rapidly enough in order to permit this same concent in any future uprisings? Mr. PUCINSKI. They are not acting rapidly enough, but I think that the problems I have enumerated here should give you a clue to their own problems. Our problem here is understanding that many of these South American govern- ments are not very stable because of the extent of subversion that exists in those countries. Many of those governments can be toppled overnight. So it is not enough for us to say that they ought to move faster. I think we Americans, first of all, have to recognize that there is a problem. Let us stop kidding ourselves. There is S, real serious problem in South America. The analysis I have presented here today indicates the extent, of sub- version that is now going on in prac- tically every nation in South America. So what we have to do, it seems to me, Is to firm up the no:laical governments of these South American countries and then firm up the OAS; and I think we Ought to try and develop this inter- American peacekeeping force as quickly as possible so that these nations that want to stand with us will know that If ere is a plot of subversion from Cuba against any one of these countries they Will be able, to fall back quickly on an inter-Amerloan peacekeeping force with- out suffering the possibility of losing the eOliesiveness and coritinuity of their respective governments. i. is one of the problems ahead of Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. I yield. Mr. DON' H. CLAUSEN. The gentle- man is suggesting then that through this beefing-up process we in effect are going to have to sponsor political organiza- tional information and in effect develop a political offensive where the Federal system of government, that has worked successfully in this country, can be im- plemented in those areas. But it is going to require people who understand the Federal system of government to assist in implementing this concept in those areas where the problem exists. Mr. PUCINSKI. I think the gentle- man is correct. Some of these points are covered in my statement. At the present time, according to the State Department, the major instrument of U.S. policy toward Cuba is a sys- tematic program of "economic denial," although this process is not likely to bring down the present regime. Infor- mation train Cuba indicates?and this Is extremely important?that this eco- nomic boycott is relatively successful but cannot be completely effective unless other free world countries cease trading with Cuba. For example, from 1963 to 1964 Japan's trade with Cuba increased 240 percent; Spain's by 300 percent. Eng- land?one a our most notable and loyal allies?has increased her exports to Cuba by 130 percent. M. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? 111r. PUCINSKI. I yield. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. It could be said that with friends like this who needs enemies? Mr. PUCINSEL The gentleman is quite correct. Cuba is a bad economic risk for any trading nation. As early as 1963 Cuba's trade balance with bloc nations started to deteriorate with their deficit of $625 million. It was estimated that she owed the Soviet bloc more than $900 million in trade alone. In addition her debt for technical aid, arms, and so forth, is $1.5 billion to Rus- sia; $430 million to Czechoslovakia; $250 million to Poland; $85 million to Hun- gary; $70 million to Rumania, and to several countries in the Western Hemi- sphere another $165 million. In 1963 the tra,de balance of Cuba with Western cquntries was favorable in the amount of $65 million. However, this had to be used for other necessities, so Cuba is now almost with no dollar re- serve. Last year she had only $20 mil- lion in reserve and this year her finan- cial situation will be much worse. The U.S.S.R. made two loans to her of $50 million and $16 million each at the end of 1964 to cover her letters of credit with Western countries and to buy basic materials pecessary to the sugar and nickel industries. At the end of 1964 Cuba had exceeded her budget for im- ports by $300 million, and the outlook for 1965 is far worse in spite of a nor- mal sugar harvest. The biggest job we have ahead of us i$ to convince our free world allies Plat :by -trading with Cuba they are helping Perpetuate the Communist regime of Fi- del Castro and helding the people of Cuba in a state of s'avery and despera- tion.' Not only that, they are financing and support Communist propaganda and subversive activities originating in Cuba. Mr. DON H, CLATJ$EN. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? Mr. PUCINSKI. I yield. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Could the gentleman tell me what the State De- partment thinks of this comment? Are they doing something about this to fol- low what the gentleman is now suggest- ing? Mr. PUCINSKI. I should like to lay these facts before the coordinate branch of the Government, the legislative branch of the Government here, this body. I should like to lay these facts before this body, as I am doing today on this 12th anniversary, in order to show MY colleagues and the American people the full toll of letting the Communists re- main in Cuba. It is my hope we will then be able to explore the reactions from the State De- partment and the other interested agencies. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Mr. Speaker, 'will the gentleman yield further? Mr. PUCINSKI. Yes, I yield to the gentleman from California. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. Well, the gentleman has certainly provided Mem- bers of Congress with an excellent rec- ord. My only regret is that there are not more Members on the floor to hear the gentleman. We have less than six Members on the floor, in my judgment. It is very regrettable, because I believe every Member of Congress should have heard this fine special order that the gentleman has taken the time to prepare. Could the gentleman tell ,me if it Is possible to reveal the sources of the gen- tleman's information? Mr, PUCINSKI. Much of this infor- mation is Obtained from, as I have said before, newspaper reports, reports of re- liable newspapers, published both in the United States and in South American countries. Much of this information is available from publicly documented sources that have come to our attention In the Cuban Freedom Committee, and much of this information is made avail- able through the sources and the people who write to us, not only from Cuba but people who hear our broadcasts in other parts of South America and who have to rely in many instances upon these broad- casts sponsored by the Cuban Freedom Committee which, incidentally, is a committee made up exclusively of Amer- ican citizens, people, many of whom have never been to Cuba, although the executive director had been a teacher In Cuba before the Communists took over, as well as from informed letters which we receive from other countries in South America written by" peoplewho hear our broadcasts. As I stated earlier, our broadcasts may Serve in many instances as the only source of straight reliable world news, because this is primarily all we broad- cast. We broadcast news from the world and the people of Cuba and the people of other South American countries who Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 17506 Approved For Release 2003/09/26i CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 CONGR IONAL RECORD ? HOUSE July 26, 1965 ear these broadcasts which emanate rom Miami, from Florida, and from ew Orleans, these people have learned rely on our broadcasts, because we do ot engage in propaganda, and we give them the truth. We give them news ver the wire services, the same news hat Americans and the people of all the free world are receiving. And these peo- le have learned to respect us for our integrity, and as a result they write in and most of the information that we get is from there very reliable sources. I wonder, if I may, just touch on this point because it may be of interest to the gentleman from California? The point I was going to make was this? Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. It is of inter- est to me because I have met the worthy organization which the gentleman is dis- cussing and, furthermore, I have had some personal con;acts with people in these various countries of the world through a missionary program with which I worked for a number of years. Mr. PUCINSKI. And, of course, the missionaries very often are excellent in their analyses. Mr. DON H. CLAUSEN. It seems to me that the people should know more about what is goir g on in these areas than the State Department. Mr. PUCINSKI. I think the gentle- man would be interested to know that just a week ago radio Havana in a broad- cast to Latin America--the gentleman asked me how we get this information? said: We wish to inform you that starting July 26 we will increase the number of frequencies through which we b?oadcast in Spanish to Latin America, Hortt America, and Central America. Besides the norMal frequencies you will be able to hear us on 25, 16, and '7 megacycles." On July 21, Ramiro Puertas, Director of the Cuban Institute of Radio, an- nounced over CMQ Havana, that this year the Institute will install a 150,000- watt station tn Ha Jana and another of the same power in F. an German, Oriente; two other 60,000-watt stations in Cam- aguey and Oriente Provinces for radio Rebelde network. On July 26, another 10,000-watt station will be inaugurated in Guantanamo; still another 60,000- watt station will be built in Cacocum, Oriente, for radio Progreso network, which will have an additional 5,000-watt stat ton in Baracoa. Also, they are installing French TV equipment to imprcve reception between Carnaguey, Guaimaro; and Victoria de las Tunas. It is important to know that this is French equipment?equipment being supplied to Communist Cuba by our supposed ally, F -ance. To show Cuba's importance to the Communists' dream of world domina- tion, I will read you another news dis- patch: The French Press Agency reported from Cairo on July 16 that the Cuban Ambassador to Egypt, before leav ng for home, had an- nounced that a conference of popular move- ments of three continents will be held in Havana on January 6, 1966. It had been de- cided at the Pourth Afro-Asian Solidarity Conference in Accra in May to extend the movement to Latin America. Representa- tives of popular Movements of six Latin Ameri an countries will participate in the prelinitnai y planning meetings which will begin in Cairo on September 1. The coun- tries are: Juba, Mexico, Venezuela, Uruguay, Chile,: rine Guatemala. The planning corn- znittees also will includes delegates of five Africati cpuntries: Egypt, Algiers, Morocco, Guinea, South Africa, and six Asian coun- thes?sthe People's Republic: of China, the U.S.S.1., India, Indonesia, Japan, and South Vietnam. i There you have it, Mx. Speaker, in the hold broad strokes of Communist takeover under our very noses. Two years ago the United States seemed to be at least in some measure awake to the Cuban danger. Today, I fear we are let- ing the immediate and close-to-home problem .;ake a secondary position in our planning and our defense. Mr. Speaker, I affirm to this House that in such a course lies hemispheric disaster. FRE4WE1EELING DISARMAMENT BINGE ENDANGERS NATIONAL SE- CUM.] 'If The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under previus order of the House, the gentle- man from California [Mr. Hosmsa] is recognized for 40 minutes. Mr HOSMER. Mr. Speaker, disarma- ment fei vor runs high in Washington todaY. The Arms Control and Disarma- ment Agency's?ACDA?buclget has bal- looned several hundred percent since its inception in 1961. Friends of Disarma- ment from intellectual' and academic circles in large numbers have enlisted voluntariliy in the cause. Prof. Jerome Wiesner, the former White House sci- ence lady .ser, recommends developing "a cadrq of people whose full-time occupa- tion" is to reorient public attitudes. He want f them "to create a vested interest in arms control"?whatever that may meariitin ess forces in the United States who recognize the danger of unrestrained dis- arm ent quickly organize and articu- late hei , position, the administration's cad, of dedicated disarmers soon will take he Nation_past the point of no re- turn Fn its flight from the proven strat- egy o ar ning to avoid trouble to the yet unprever, strategy of disarming to avoid it. DISARMEI S WORK QUIETLY AND EFFECTIVELY The dimrmers carry on their work un- obtruisively. As yet the public is not conditior ed to disarmament. The ma- jority, of Americans still believes world peacq as well as national survival de- pends on strength coupled with negotia- tion rather than negotiation alone. The average person is scared half out of his wits rhea some enterprising writer digs - out rad publicizes facts on various ACDsr onsored disarmament studies. This watt the case when things came to ligiat as the study on togetherness with Russia and its study suggesting self-im- posellinitations on intelligence gather- ing e orts. The work of Washington's disarmers is being made easier by the seemingly cal- culated elimination of top military spokasmen capable of comunicating au- thoritatively with the American public. Such popular figures as Admiral Arleigh "31 Knot" Burke and cigar-chomping Gen. Curtis LeMay are on the retired rolls. No successors have been permitted to develop public prominence. Probably not one person in a thousand can even name our present Chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A tribute to the steady progress of the disarmers came recently in the form of a lack of outcry when a U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., the late Adled Stevenson, promised a further softening of the American position on test ban treaty safeguards. When negotiations for a comprehensive treaty broke off in 1963, U.S. demands for annual inspections in Soviet territory had been whittled from 20 to 7. Khrushchev still adamantly maintained "three or four" would be ample. Stevenson promised that the Johnson administration now "is willing to explore" further what constitutes "an adequate inspection system." Public apathy toward the possible con- sequences of the promise has encouraged and accelerated preparation of many other advanced disarmament positions, some of which President Johnson is ex- pected to offer the Soviets when the 18- nation Disarmament Conference recon- venes in Geneva tomorrow. These include: MULTILATERAL NUCLEAR UMBRELLA This proposal calls for pledges by nuclear have-nu; nations to refrain from seeking nuclear capabilities in exchange for pledges from the U.N.'s nuclear "haves" to aid them if they fall victim to atomic aggression. Whether the occur- rence of "aggression" is to be determined by the U.N.'s frequently paralyzed Gen- eral Assembly, its veto-ridden Security Council, the nonnuclear victim or the nuclear pledgegiver is uncertain. TOTAL TEST BAN TREATY This proposal to enlarge the present limited test ban treaty to include a bar against tests underground as well as in other environments Would be based on "splitting the difference" between United States and U.S.S.R. inspection demands and fixing the number at five annually. Professor Wiesner and ACDA believe "five inspections per year will provide adequate security against clandestine nuclear testing." However, hearings of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy cast considerable doubt on this optimistic assessment. Additionally, they raised monumental doubts whether even un- limited opportunities for inspection could penetrate the precautions of a determined cheater. This is because the Soviets insist on severe limitations on factors affecting the quality as well as the quantity of inspections. These in- clude tight restrictions on size and com- position of inspection teams, allowable inspection techniques, permissible equip- ment, mode and freedom of travel and communications, length of the inspection period and the like. DESTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS Several years ago the disarmament concept of "we'll burn our bombers and you burn yours" was seriously con- sidered. Its cu::Tent adaptation is ex- pected to take the form of a proposal that the United States and 'U.S.S.R. junk Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 1802 Approved For ReleacectglitaMBD.MAG-FILIKOK044 tion Subcommittee, in which the airlines were severely criticized for neglecting- the less_ profitable service to smaller cities. Additional economy services on highly traveled routes. Free stopover privileges. With such privi- leges, a man flying from New York to Los Angeles might stop in Chicago for a few clays at no extra cost. The Board, which abolished these privileges in 1958 when the airlines were having financial problems, said that now that the airlines' finances had improved, they should be revived as a method of stimu- lating vacation travel in the United States and from abroad. NO REACTION YET There has been no official reaction from the airline yet, but one industry source pri- vately predicted "a very strong" one. , Addressing itself to air fares, the Board vir- tually told the airlines to forget about any Increases and concentrate on reductions. After first noting that the rate of return Of the 11 domestic trunk carriers had risen to 10.6 percent in the 12 months ended March 31, 1965, the Board said: "In this setting, the Board believes it is difficutt ,to find justification for fare in- ? creases. }tall er, the CAB feels, the pres- ent favorable earnings position of the airlines ?offers an excellent opportunity for carriers therriselves to consider reductions in faxes or improvements in service without fare increases." The Board rejected two fare increase pro- posals by American Airlines and United Air Lines, and ordered investigations of the proposals. Its remarks, which developed into a major policy statement, were attached to an order issued yestera,dy allowing certain airlines to put liberalized baggage allowances into effect $unday. FOREIGN FLIGIITS UNAFFECTED The Board's orders apply only to domestic airlines and have no effect on fares or services on overseas flights, which are negotiated among the world's airlines and then ap- proved by the various governments. Its re- marks were aimed primarily at the Nation's 11 trunk carriers and do not apply to local- service airlines. The new policy apparently grew out of the trunk carriers' relatively recent prosperity. , "Current earnings of the domestic trunk line carriers," the Board said, "are well above the 10.5 percent rate a return considered to be fair and reasonable in the Board's de- cision of Novenkber ,25, 1960, in the general passenger fare Iuvestigation. "The 10.5 percent rate of return lias been reached in the 12 Months ended March 31, 1965, and reports of current earnings show the trend continues strongly upward." In the year ended December 31, the airlines averaged an even 10 percent return, accord- ing to a CAB spokesman. The percentage breakdown was as follows: American, 9.7; Eastern 2.7; TWA, 11.0; United, 7.4; Braniff, 11.7; Continental, 12.3; Delta, 17.4; National, 15.6; Northeast, negli- ble or negative; Northwest Orient, 15.9; and Western, 184. Trans World reported yesterday that its revenues and earnings had set a second- quarter record. It said its net earnings for the 3 months ended June rose 30.4 percent to $15,875,000 from $12,172,000 earned in the second, quarter a year ago. FOUR YEARS WERE LEAN The airlines, however, were not always so profitable. From 1960 to 1964 the four larg- est trunks averaged a 3.9-percent return ivhile the others managed 7 percent. And in the 10-year period after 1955 the four giants?American, Eastern, TWA, and United?averaged 5.3 percent. The seven Others averaged 6.5 percent in the same period. A9.19080005-4 July 29, 1965 The new prosperity is generally attributed to two major factors?the general business boom, now in its fifth year, and the advent of civilian jet passenger transports. Jets are faster, more comfortable, more reliable, and generally superior to the old piston-engined aircraft in use before 1958. They are cheaper to run and maintain and can be more effectively utilized. All these factors have led to higher profits. More and more passengers have been climb- ing into the big jets. And in the airline business, every passenger after the break- even point is 80-percent profit. However, a number of Government officials and agencies have been watching those profits. Earlier this year there was talk of a jet fuel tax. One Senator suggested the air- lines take over the subsidies to the strug- gling helicopter lines, which, indeed, the air- lines have, to a certain extent. POST OFFICE ASKS REDUCTION And the Post Office Department, for whom the airlines have been carrying mail, has asked for a reduction in its payments to the airlines. Under the present rates, estab- lished on June 7, 1955, the Post Office pays the major trunks $58.8 million a year. The Post Office made its proposal on December 2; 1964, and United Air Lines quickly proposed that the industry offer an 8-percent reduction. This now appears likely to be accepted, according to Selig Alt- schul, a consultant to the industry. If the new rate is accepted, the Post Office will pay about $54 million, or $5 million less. The reduction would affect the trunks plus the local-service airlines and cargo lines, but it represents a loss of only $132,000 for each local-service line and $27,000 for each cargo carrier. A spokesman for the Air Transport Asso- ciation said the industry had only recently become very profitable and needed "adequate earnings" for a "protracted period." Pro- tracted period means about 5 years to most airline men. The spokesman also said the industry had $2.4 billion worth of new airplanes on order, which will have to be paid for, in addition to the supersonic transports expected in the mid-1970's. W/-1- COMM ACE IN CUBA 4 Mr. THURMOND. Mr. President, the current conflict in Vietnam is so serious that all Americans must be on their guard lest they forget the Communist menace in our own backyard?namely, the Communist bastion on the island of Cuba. In the current issue of Reader's Digest, there is a very pertinent reminder of the dangers we face, and indeed all the American nations face, from Com- munist Cuba. This reminder takes the form of an article by Kenneth 0. Gil- more entitled, "Cuba's Brazen Blueprint for Subversion." I ask unanimous consent that this article be printed in the RECORD. There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: CUBA'S BRAZEN BLUEPRINT FOR SUBVERSION (By Kenneth 0, Gilmore) Here is the inside story of Castro's most audacious attempt to establish communism on the mainland of Latin America. On the northern coast of Venezuela's Paraguana Peninsula, there is a lonely stretch of beach in a small inlet known as Macarna. Half a mile from this beach, in a two-room stucco hut, lives 24-year-old Lino Gerardo Amaya, a wiry, quiet campesino. On the morning of November 1, 1963, Lino and his 18-year-old brother, Pedro, set out along the beach in search of a lost goat. They came upon two men in bathing suits, standing on the shore looking out to sea. Beside them Was a shiny 16-foot aluminum boat with a handsome outboard motor. The taller of the two calmly waved his hand. "Hello, Prank, how are you? Don't you work for the Creole company?" "I'm not Frank," replied Lino, "and I never worked for Creole." Lino didn't find his goat that day. But shortly before 5 p.m. he and his brother head- ed back to the beach, fishing poles in hand. All that day a thundercloud of suspicion had been building up in his mind. What were those two strangers up to? At the beach the brothers found the boat and outboard motor. And more. The coarse dark sand was scuffed with footprints?lots of footprints now etched by the lengthening shadows. And something else. A rope mark, its coils clearly imprinted in the sand, led from the water toward a tree. Lino followed the mark, Pedro behind him. At its end they spotted the corner of a piece of canvas. They pulled it up. Underneath lay a large dark bag. They dragged it out and loosened a thick drawstring. Four auto- matic rifles. And layers of bulging cartridge belts. On hands and knees they pawed away more sand and found more sacks of rifles, more cartridge belts. And now that they looked harder, it was apparent that a large section of sand was loose and soft ahead of them. Lino sprang up. "We've got to tell the police," he said. BURIED TREASURE Shortly before 10 p.m. Lino arrived at the Jadacaquiva police station. He told his story to the prefect, Antonio Lug-5, Whd immediately relayed the news to Police Corn- mandant Eusebio Olivares Navarrate, at Punto Fijo, the largest town on the penin- sula. Olivares roared off for the lonely beach with five jeeploads of policemen. Soon the police were digging into the sand like pirates seeking lost treasure, grunting, heaving, hauling. In 15 minutes, Olivares had seen enough. He switched on the radio in his patrol car, gave the stunning news to the State Governor, Pablo Saher. It took 4 hours to hoist the entire deposit from its temporary grave. The hole in the g rund was 8 feet deep, 6, feet wide and 90 feet long. The cache?automatic rifles, machineguns, antitank guns, Mortars, ba- zookas, demolition charges and thousands of rounds of ammunition?weighed 3 tons. In Caracas, the Venezuelan capital, Presi- dent ROmulo Betancourt was awakened at home and briefed by phone. He ordered a naval patrol of the peninsula and sent a special alert to every security and military agency in the, country. For 2-years Fidel Cas- tro had boasted that he would export his Cuban revolution to the mainland of South America. Oil-rich Venezuela was his prime target. "With victory in Venezuela," cried Cuba's old-line Communist boss Blas Roca, "we shall no longer be a solitary island in the Caribbean confronting the Yankee im- perialists." Castro-trained guerrillas or Venezuela's Communist Armed Forces of Na- tional Liberation (FALN) had terrorized the countryside in an attempt to paralyze the nation. They had dynamited oil pipelines and bridges, burned stores and warehouses, robbed banks, raided police stations, kid- naped and murdered offilals and blasted the streets with sniper and machinegun fire. More than 50 policemen had been cut down in the streets of Caracas alone, and twice as many civilians. But never before had the FALN been equipped with mortars and bazookas. Obvi- ously something special was afoot. A NEW LEAD At the heavily protected Caracas headquar- ters of Venezuela's state security police Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 july 29, 1965 AP P r?v8acaleig4Ti.9.?34942&SLA:W?i7iip0446R000500080005-4 18141 71erald, rernis as A s :quent t aveler between the three cities serv- iced by Eastern's shuttle, I :aighly endorse ,your ac/ion. Since I left the staff of WBZ in 1961, I have a$ raged a trip a week between Boston- New Yo k-Washington on behalf of my busi- ness. 4fter becoming a commuter. I soon switche1 to regular usage Of Northeast. ? Easte n is using some of the oldest equip- ment cirreiitly in service on U.S. carriers. :The at itude of the emplomes, and, the treaem t eel customers leaves Much to be desired. Among regular travelers, Eastern is conside ed to be one of the 1:ountrVs worst airlines. This fact was Snell ded as part of a recent Time article. While other aspects ' of East rn's aystem has improved, nothing has beeza done about the shuttle. There is a runlet that jetprop craft will be used on the Bo ton-New York run, similar to what has jut been introduced on the Boston- : Washin on. run. Perhaps eve shall see the ? fifth fate increase. /t is shame-that with all of Northeast's = proble s the public is not aware that their BostontNew York service ha 3 more Modern equipm nt, better service, and $2 cheaper. For a while I lived in LW, Angeles. The service between San Francisco and Los Angeles is excellent. The equipment is superb, and, the trip takes less time, even though,it is a greater distance. Moreover, the far s are about the same. hope your efforts are well rewarded. I comnie4id you for taking up this task on be- half of the frequent air passenger. If there is any tray I can be of service to you in re- gard tc the investigation, I ehall be pleased to assi t. Thank? you for your interese in this matter. incerely, THOMAS F Certereat, Vice President. of your proposed investigation con.- the Eastern Air Line shuttle service. ? citizen of Massachusetts, and, fre- Peasexc, N.J. July 19,1965. MY tzsg SENATOR: I am glad to hear some- one is on the ball about Eastern Air Lines shuttle to Boston. useld to go to Boston about two times a month to visit my son who li Tes in Rockland, the fare used. to be $10 one-way about a year ago. Then It went to $11, $12, $13; then $14. I don't know what it Is now because I can't afford t any more. Tha k you, thank you. OUSE, PAHL FORKIIS. NEW YORK, July 19, 1965. Senato EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR: I have read with interest of your planned inquiry into eastern Airlines shuttle operations and hope that you will follow through on this. I an4 at a loss to understand why it costs $16 tol fly between Boston and New York when ne can fly between Los Angeles and San Ftfancisco, nearly twice the distance, on new jetplanes for $13.50. Probably you have noted +'Western's jets fly over profit 'Ceiling'" in Bu4inesa Week, March 6, 1965, page 54. Youifs for better rates for the east coast, ery truly yours, A. H. Clow. THE G OWE WASEINGTON UNIIERSITY, SCHOOL or MEDICINE, Washington, D.C., July 20, 1965. = Sena r EDWARD M. KENNEDY, U.S, S nate, Washi gton, D.C. DE4 SENATOR KENNEDY: Congratulations on yo r speech of July 19 as reported in to- day's Washington Post concerning Eastern Airlin4s shuttle service. I recently 4ove 1 back to the East Coast after 2. years In Ios Angeles and it always amazed me why slruttle service between Los Angeles and Sean. Ieancisco (450 miles) costs about $12 while the same service between New York and Washington (225 miles) costs $18. In addition the west coast service was on Lockheed Elea ea and Boeing 707 while the east coast] ser vice was on old Lockheed Constellation* I support yuLa urging a CAB investiga- tion of the uonopolistic and price-fixing practices of lastarn Airlines since simple arithmetic s gests that the cost between New York an Washington should he about $6 even if you do: set take into consideration the old equiPment being used by Eastern Airlines. Sincerely yours, PHILIP Keynes. WASHINGTON, D.C. DEAR SENATpR Bernier:re: I read with great interest in this m erning's Post of yoer ques- tions about the p 'actices of Eastern Airlines on the Washington-New York (and other Eastern) rune. I have lived in Washington the past 10 ydars, use the air services to New York (and ocqa,sicnally to Boston) fairly fre- quently, and 'anatee your view that there is no question hut that Eastern has systemati- cally squeezed ou its competitors, and hav- ing done so his inflated its fares on the spar- tan shuttle-service. I am also familiar with the San Fran ism -Los Angeles fare structure where for a srnaller fare the rider gets almost twice as Iongtft ride and far better service on a variety of Oarri are. Good luck with your inquiry. Grateful*, Rev. E. R. Commie WASHINGTON, D.C. Hon. EDWARD M. KENNEDY, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.: Please accept n y heartiest congratulations for your efforts in calling for CAB and con- gressional investigation of Eastern Airlines monopoly of ehu tie service. It's high time all of Eastere Ali lines operations get a good look-at. EVELYN FREEMAN. BROOKLYN, N.Y., July 21, 1965. DEAR SENATOR KENNEDY: Congratulations on your suggestion that an investigation is needed in ccinne ation with the air service between Bohton and Washington. I've stopped flying this route. It's just= too ex- pensive. I drive nstead. But don't stop with Boston-New York service. The Ne e York-Washington routes likewise have become too expensl.ve. We don't need frills cr jets on these short routes. Low fares and frequency of service will bring In. the custOmers. You rightly c:ompared these serviceP w th the very excellent Los Angeles-San Francisco service which is also a real travel laarg sin. Perhaps those western airlines should be invited to come east and set up shop here, Frankly, I think our airlanes in the Bos- ton-New York-Washington area are danger- ously overcrowd( d. More attentio:a should be given toviard improving the rad service on these short-haul runs so that there will be enough air space for the longer domestic air routes. Why, fortemple, do we have to wait for more rail s clies and surveys? With the existing rail eqt ipment and road beds we could speed 'up ? the service from New York to either Boston or Washington by simply eliminating all tee stops between New York and Boston and Washington. The planes fly nonstop. WLy can't we have one non- stop train letving New York in the morning and one in the evening bound for Boston and Washington. The Merchants Limited presently mikes five stops between Grand Central and South Statin. Allowing 10 minutes loss for each stop, I would guess that the schedule could be speeded up by 50 min- utes if these five stops were eliminated. The train speed would not haee to be increased. It could be advertised as "Downtown to Downtown" express service I realize that solutions o our transporta- tion problems are not an. easy, thing and that there are many problems involved about which the average person such as myself are not aware. However, I am heartened that you are at least trying to get something done about the poor transportation in this area. Sincerely, LEO M. SCHARIO, Jr. [From the Washington (D.C.) Evening Star, July 26, 1965] Ase FARE MYSTERY Senator EDWARD KENNEDY'S demand for an investigation of the Washington-New York- Boston air shuttle service has let in some much-needed light on a mystifying subject. When Eastern Air Lines began this highly popular service in 1961, the rate was $14 for a trip between here and New York. A seat was guaranteed to each passenger, with no reservation needed, even if a second plane had to be ordered. Such a cheap com- muter run carried an understandable appeal. The effect was to lure business away frons competitors and give Easeern an 80 percent monopoly, according to Senator KENNEDY. But since then Eastera has successively raised the fare to the point where, at $18, it exceeds the price for some conventional flights. An airline spokesman cites costs of standby planes and crews among the rea- sons for this. Without condemning Eastern out of hand, it remains a curious fact that airlines are now flying, passengers between Los Angeles and San Francisco?a 340-mile trip?for $13.50 plus tax, using jets. Is the shorter Washington-New York piston-plane run so much more costly to operate? Two rival airlines, United and TWA, have applications now pending before the Civil Aeronautics Board to hegin unrestricted Washington-New York-Boston flights. A United spokesman adds that jets would be used, and that a fare not exceeding the Los Angeles-San Francisco rate is contemplated for Washington to New 'Fork. The decision on jets must await results of a study by the Federal Aviation Agency of National Airport, due by December. But it seems obvious that a little more competition on this lucrative, heavily traveled route would benefit the public. [From the New York Times, July 29, 19651 AIRLINES TOLD To PUT PROSPERITY INTO LOWER FARES?CAB ALSO TELLS CARRIERS To ADD COACH SEATS AND ALLOW FREE STOP- OVERS (By Frederic C. Appel) The Civil Aeronautics Board told the Na- tion's airlines yesterday that they were mak- ing too much money and, should start pass- ing some of It on to the consumer in the form of lower fares and better service. The Board said It thought the following improvements could be made: Lower fares on short trips. The Board noted that the new short-range jets now coming into use had lower operating costs that could make possib:e lower fares over routes such as that between New York and Washington. More coach seats. The Board suggested a higher ratio of coach seats to first-class seats to reflect the public's desire. Last year 76 percent of domestic air passengers flew coach, according to the Air Transportation Associa- tion. The Board also ca:.led for more coach service into more communities. More service to smaller cities, This sug- gestion was apparently a reaction to a hear- ing, ended 2 weeks ago, by the Senate Avia- Approved For Release 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 July 29, 1965 CQNORESSIONAL RECORD ? SENATE (Digepol), Chief of investigation Orlando Garcia Vazquez studied a surveillance report that had just come to his desk. It was late Monday afternoon November 3, exactly 48 hours after Lino had looked under the can- vas. The report disclosed that at 10: 30 a.m, that day a young woman known to have Communist connectians was seen near the home of Eduardo Machado, a Venezuelan Communist Party boss. She was followed to a cafe op Negrin Street, where she sat chatting with three men. Fifty minutes later all four drove to a complex of four housing units known as "UrbanizaciOn Simon Rodriguez." The woman strolled to building No. 1 and took the outside elevator to a fourth-floor apartment, No. 49. Her campanions loitered In the area, making sure she was not being followed. Two hours later she came back to the car and sped to the old section of the city, where she was observed talking with several leaders of Central University's Com- munist-Controlled student federation, some of whom had recently returned from Cuba. Inspector Garcia was sure apartment No. 49 was "hot." Too many precautions had been. taken, "I :think we had better hit this place as soon as possible," he told his boss. Shortly after midnight five Digepol agents ? in two groups sauntered toward building No. 1, chatting and laughing as if returning from a party. Garcia and two agents took the elevator to the fourth floor, while the others climbed the stairs, the only other exit. , Garcia knocked gently at apartment 49. There was a shuffling of slippers. The door opened a crack, revealing a middle-aged woman in a nightgown. "We've come with a search warrant," said Garcia shouldering his way in. "Is anyone else here?" , "No," she replied. In a bedroom they found a young man in bed. "Stay very still," warned Garcia. "Who are you?' "German LOpez Mendez," the man replied, and handed over his identification card. No. 618945--GermAn Lapez Mendez?born No- vember 27, 1941-5 feet, 6 inches?hair, brown?eyes, brown. On the left-hand corner was pasted a small mug shot: a slim face, placid eyes, thin mustache, wavy hair. It matched the man. "What's your occupation?" Garcia asked. "I'm a teacher. Just visiting here for a Conple of days." "Okay, don't move while we search," Garcia said, ' =LE ow Vaaoa The men began to hunt, opening closets, pulling out drawers, looking under beds and in toilet tanks. Under one corner of the suspect's bed two objects were extracted: the first, a small light-blue airline traveling bag full of drawing equipment and mate- rials?ink pens, tracing paper, rulers, com- passes, crayons. "What are you doing with these?" Garcia asked LOpez. "I've never seen them before," Lopez an- swered, as if bored. At first, Garcia thought the second item was a Bible. Book-size, it was enclosed in a dark, brown leather case with a zipper on three sides, the kind of covering often used for a Bible. Inside was a looseleaf notebook. Garcia flipped through some '70 pages. He found that he was holding an instructor's manual on the handling of arms and explo- sives?an PAIR "bible." Garcia glanced at the man on the bed. "This belong to you?" "No." About 6 am, Garcia returned to headquar- ters With hia two suspects. "Keep search- ing," Pe told tWo, agents left behind. "Mat- tresses, pillows, everything. When you're fin- ished, start all over again. There's bound to be more than we've founsi." No. 138-20 Digepol's files indicated that the woman, who claimed to be a nurse, was a contact for a fugitive FALN leader. The man who called himself Lopez was fingerprinted, and a search through the flies disclosed his real identity: Luis Eduardo Sanchez Madero, age 24. On the margins of the FALN sabotage manual were notes jotted down in his handwriting, among them a precise schedule of his last day of instruction on October 21: 6 a.m.? rise; 8 to 12?courses in artillery and mortar; 2 to 6 p.m.?training in recoilless rifle, ba- zooka and maohinegun and cryptography; 8 to 10?study; 11?bedtime. PUZZLE BECOMES PICTURE Meanwhile, at apartment 49, an agent had found, taped to the bottom of a desk drawer, a 2-inch-thick stack of papers. Included in the material were lengthy descriptions of arms and explosives plus an intricate checklist for pulling off a successful sabotage or kidnaping operation: escape routes, floor plans, guards, alarm systems, cover stories, hiding places. There was also a large map of Caracas showing every street and major building in the city, and four pieces of transparent paper?overlays for the map? dotted by rectangles, circles, arrows, asterisks, crosses, parallel bars and triangles. What did it all mean? Garcia and his men studied these and other items, zeroing in on several papers crisscrossed with neat- ly ruled lines. At the top of each perpen- dicular column were large letters: "F," the symbol for fusil, Spanish for rifle; "PERS" for persons; "M" for mortar; "Car" for cafione sin retroceso?recoilless rifle; and "B" for bazooka. The same type of arms found at Macama. More notes were studied, such as a list of apartment buildings, offices and streets with specific designations of weapons. These numbers were compared. The map was pulled out, and the overlays with their sym- bols were arranged and rearranged. At last the puzzle became a picture. The rectangu- lar figure meant "artillery," the triangle "fixed group," the open circle "troop posi- tions," the slanted parallel lines "barricade," the cross "emergency station," the five-sided figure surrounded by arrows "object of at- tack." Sanchez Madero had drawn up a detailed plan for attack upon Caracas using the weapons delivered at Macama. The Urdaneta barracks was the prime ob- jective. A walled fort perched on the city's highest ground, it held a concentration of troops. Here also were tanks, near a jail holding top FALN terrorists. The scheme: isolate the troops and free the prisoners to join in the attack. This 1 phase of the operation called for 3 artillery units, 6 fixed groups of 3 to 4 men, 3 mobile groups plus positioning of 12 FALN troop units in care- fully chosen locations. Assigned to do the job were 374 men, 195 rifles, 8 mortrars, 12 bazookas, 4 recoilless rifles, 75 machineguns. Apartment houses near the barracks were selected, from which snipers and machine gunners could pick off soldiers trying to reach jeeps and armored cars. Mortars would knock out key exits, sabotage units would cut telephone lines, seize power stations and blow up vital streets; bazookas and recoilless rifles would be waiting for tanks?if they made it through the carnage. FANTASTIC? At Miraflores Palace the attack plan was laid before President Betancourt. "To those of us who have witnessed "FALN's murder and arson for 3 years, it doesn't seem so shocking," he confided to a colleague. "But this is going to look fantastic to the outside world," Indeed, the question was: Would the "out- side world" believe it? Could they prove conclusively where the plan had originated, where the arms had come from? The first point hinged on Sanchez Madero. 18143 An exhaustive check of all airline listings was undertaken. It was a long shot but it paid off. Sanchez Madero had fled from Venezuela to Jamaica on March 5, 1962, listed as "Luis E. Sanchez M.," after an armored-car robbery in which his fingerprints were found. In Jamaica he had boarded a KLM special flight, No. 977 from Kingston to Havana, Cuba. He had cockily given the airline his destination address: House of Americas (headquarters in Havana for the infamous Institute of People's Friendship, the processing agency for Cuba's Latin American terrorist trainees). Tracing of the arms was turned over to the Venezuelan Army. An elaborate effort had been made to disguise the weapons. All serial numbers had been ground off. Near the trigger of each rifle, a hole had been cut, obviously to remove the insignia. But whose insignia? Several of the weapons were rushed to Fabrique Nationale d'Armes de Guerre at Herstal-lez-Liege, Belgium, whose trade- mark had been left on. Fabrique Nationale, the largest private arms manufacturer in the Weatern World, had flied on order by the Cuban Army for 22,500 automatic rifles on March 23, 1959. Now company experts examined the rifles dug up at Macama and reported that "the coat of arms of Cuba was stamped in the place where a cut has been made." Moreover, the Cuban weapons had their serial numbers uniquely located on the left side of the trigger guard, as these had been before they were ground off. Rifles with these characteristics had never been delivered to any country but Cuba. As for the 31 "UZI" 9-mm. machineguns, the Belgian company also confirmed that they had been bought by Cuba. But the Vene- zuelans went a step further. Where a qeal had obviously been ground away, an etching solution was applied. Slowly the chemical made decipherable the outlines of a legend. Under a magnifying glass an ornate crest could be distinguished?the crest of the Cuban Army. The case was airtight. At was time to bring charges. IRREFUTABLE PROOF The wood-paneled main council room of the Pan American Union Building, 4 blocks from the White House in Washington, D.C., was packed on December 3, 1963. Venezuela had called the Organization of American States into emergency session to charge Cuba with aggression. Ambassador Enrique Te- jera-Paris of Venezuela was speaking: "The people of Venezuela have been the constant victims of the insults and attacks of Cuba's Castro regime, Now in the face of the new act of aggression by Cuba, for which there is definite and irrefutable proof, Venezuela is forced to take this action." An investigating commission was immedi- ately set up, composed of representatives of Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Uruguay and the United States. On December 8, the commission flew to Caracas, along with a team of military advisers. There they heard detailed accounts from a score of witnesses ranging from Minister of National Defense Gen. Antonio Bricerio to Juan DeDios Marin, a young Venezuelan who had been in Cuba for several months receiving military training in the handling of arms and guerrilla tactical Venezuelan Army officials picked out weap- ons at random, and before the eyes of the in- vestigators demonstrated how the Cuban in- signia could be raised chemically. Ward P. Allen, chief U.S. representative, was espcially curious about the aluminum skiff and out- board motor that had been left behind on the beach that first morning by the two strangers. Odd, he thought?a Johnson See "Inside a Castro `Terror School,'" the Reader's Digest, December 1964, Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 "so The Ltd. Am -rho thr. fo C36 co Approved For Release 2O3/O9/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 44 CONGRESSONAL RECORD - SENATE meth the manufasturer's marking: utboard Marine Corporation of Canada, serial number C367809. The Canadian a.ssatior in Caracas was asked to have the r investigated. A :'eport came back ugh Canadian Government channels: Johnson outboard motors, including 809, had been purchased by an exporting party in Montreal anc. flown to Cuba on Oct ber 1, 1963 consigned to the National Ins auto of Agrarian Reform, Poultry Div sion. - A DAMNING iMRDICT n February 24, 1964, the OAS Commis- presented its verdict: "The shipment male up of arms originating in Cuba t were surreptitiously landed at a solitary t on the coast for the purpose of being d in subversive operations to overthrow constitutional Gayer ernent of Venezuela. e objective of the Caracas plan was to tore the city of Caracas, to prevent the ding of elections on December 1, 1963, and seize control of the country." is plan, plus Cuba's propaganda thods, provision df funds, training in sabo- e and guerrilla operations, concluded the estigators, added up to "a policy of aggres- n." A 112-page repor r, was submitted with mountain of facts and proof, much of ich Is the basis for the preceding account. Colombia's OAS representative found it to contain his fury. "This is not an cident of unwary sailors," he declared. "It a seesious international incident which is of a carefully thought-out plan of uba for carrying the Communist revolu- on to the hemisphere." La Tribune, a major newspaper in Lima, era, comtnented: "WI at is important is the ext step: that is, what kind of action will e taken against a Government convicted of tined intervention?" Incredibly, the answer to that question as in grave doubt. Several Latin corm- ries balked at imposing firm measures gains% Cuba, clinging to the ancient con- ept of nonintervention which had originated ears before Soviet ccnununism moved into he hemisphere. Principal backsliders were exico, Uruguay, Bolivia, Chile, and Brazil, all of whom at the tune maintained diplo- matic relations with Cuba. BANCTIONS--OR NOT? Venezuela would not be put off, and pressed for s foreign ministers' conference of the 20 American Republics to punish Castro. It called for mandatory steps such as cutting off all trade, air travel and diplomatic rela- tions with Cuba. "If the OAS does not apply sanctions to Castro's Cuba, it means the bankruptcy of dem ecracy and the inter- American system," warned Venezuela's For- eign Minister Marcos Falcen Briceno. Then in April 1964 a revolution in Brazil lid by 'Oen. Humberto Castel() Bra,nco, a firm alitt-Castrolte, ousted left-leaning President 3040 Goularta Soon after, Brazil expelled Cuba's diplomatic delegation. Now those seeking stern: measures against Castro felt that the continent's largest nation could be Minted on When the chips were down. weeks, then Months, dragged by While diplomats dickered over sanctions that would assure the necessary two-thirds vote. Finally, on July 21, more than 8 months after Lino stumbled on the arms at Macama, the hemisphere's foreign ministers gathered in Washington for the crucial voting. : The hemisphere states shonld not man- tai diplom tic or Consular relations with (suba; 14 yes, 4 no l abstain. They should isteepend their trade, either direct or indirect, With Cuba, excels; for humanitarian rea- Sets: same 'vote. They should suspend all sea -tranSportation again with the human- itarian exception: 14 yea, 3 no, 2 abstain. , Any ' new attempts to subvert an American ? , ? 11 See "The County That' Saved Itself," the Reader's Digest, Novetriber 1964. sio eve th sp. us th Republic casuld bring quick armed retaliation without consul ie.-don: 15 yes, 4 no. By the : tin .e the final resolution had passed, it 'was 12:15 a.m., July 26, the day Castro antralle celebrates the birth of his revolutionary July 26 Movement. At long last -the Atnerizan Republics had branded an outlaw in thd.r midst. Within 6 months Chile, 13oltv1a, and Uruguay broke relations with Cube. More significant was that key resolution: giv ng the green light to OAS na- tions, alohe or collectively, to strike back without dela:: should Castro ba caught in further sebve 'don. Tee THEENT REMAINS Whether this provision will be used for direct retaliation against the Cuban sanc- tuary is , quite another matter. Just last November representatives of Latin American Communtst 2arties slipped into Havana to map out a beta new strategy with the Soviets to accelerate Red-revolutions. A secret dec- laration treleased In Moscow 2 months later) was signed prcanising "active aid" to "free- dom fighters' in Colombia, Guatemala, Hon- duras, Mraguay, Panama, Haiti, and Vene- zuela. Operatione center for this guerrilla warfare Is Cuba's subversion and espionage agency, the DGe (whose biggest unit promotes Latin revolutions), advised by at least five Soviet Intelligence specialists. Squads of Latin Americans ere trained by the DGI's Depart- ment of Special Schools. This department and other Cuban organizations have turned out at least 5,000 graduates. "This training today represent the most serious threat to democracy in Latin America," says Assist- ant Seeretery of State for inter-American Affairs Jac. H. Vaughn. "We know of cases where 'the individuals of a given country trained; in Cuba return by the hundreds. Theszhteople form a cadre of guerrilla units, and , larger the number, the greater the threat ultmately that they will make a move.'?' ' AS APPALLING SCOREBOARD The seoleboard of riots, bombings, asses- sinatiqns, violence and espionage emanating from pubs is appalling. In Guatemala a band Of terrorists with a hard-core strength of abhut 300 men roams the mountains with headqparters in the Lake Izabal region. Five Of them eecently burned the U.S.-aid-pro- gram !garege in Guatemala City, gutting 23 vehicles. Last February during a festive pa- rade in ti e capital, ten Guatemalan soldiers were ;killed by a grenade lobbed into the back ef their truck. Chief of these guerrillas is stocky, tough :Marco Antonio Yon Sousa who 4as secretly received $200,000 from the DGI. A eontngent of Panamanian communists recently went bank to Cuba for a second round ce guerrilla instruotion, while even mord are preparing to journey to Havana. Next door in Colombia, banditry and kid- nappings, once confined to remote rural re- gion*, are closing in on the cities. Former Cabinet Minister Harold eider was grabbed by 4idm,ppers and a $250,000 price put on his ittead even though he had been murdered before tie =son' demand. A newly orga- nized Iluban-backed Army of National Liberation (ELN) directs much of this vio- lende. in Moscow, Pravda propagandizes that events in Colombia are "very little different Iron t thi dirty war being fought in Vietnam." Finally, look at the grim tragedy in the Do inloan. Republic. In classic style a band of killed communists swifty exploited an exptoeit e chaotic revolution. At least 77 knOwn communists were 'pinpointed and, as Pride at Johnson has disclosed, "two of the priMe : eaders In the rebel forces were men with. a ,ong history of communist association and insurrections." He noted that many of She 'conspirators" were "trained in Cuba" anti., "seeing a chance to increase disorder, to lgair, a Mothold, joined the revolution." ',proved For Relee July 29, 1965 WHERE NEXT Where will the graduates of the Soviet- Cuban Communist combine strike next? Where within our hemisphere will U.S. soldiers have to be sent next to avert a Com- munist coup while Havana and Moscow have a propaganda field day? And will we and our friends be able to discover and act against the next blueprint for subversion before it is too late? No one can say?so long as an operations center for "wars of liberation" functions with impunity in Cuba. Time and time again our officials haee said this subversion "must stop," yet it continues. Our words and warnings are scorned, and we go on merely reacting to one Cuban-fomented foray after another. One long-overdue solution is for the OAS to modernize its rules and machinery so that it can act swiftly against Communist "inter- ventions." Otherwise' Latin countries must accept United States fast action when lives and liberties of nations are In the balance, as In the Dominican Republic. Another solution lies in tightening the economic noose around Cuba. Considering the mess communism has made of the Cuban economy, experts say it would collapse within weeks if most outsits assistance was cut off. Why, for example, should we permit a pro- cession of Soviet oil tankers to steam into the Caribbean to fuel Cuba's industries and utilities so that this springboard for sub- version can survive? And why should we allow non-Communist nations to furnish vital items-867 shiploads since 1963? When Secretary of State Dean Rusk called for sanctions against Cuba last summer, he pointed out that "subversion supported by terror, sabotage, and guerrilla action is as dangerous a form of aggression as an armed attack." And he added these signiiicant words: "Today it is Venezuela which is under attack. Is there any one of us who can say with assurance, '1; cannot be my country tomorrow'?" THE ORDEAL OF OTTO O'iEPICA Mr. THURMOND. Mr. President, in the current issue of Readers' Digest, there appears an article entitled "The Ordeal of Otto Otepka." This article relates in summary form the outrageous case of the treatment of a dedicated se- curity officer in the State Department whose honesty, loyalty, and perseverance in his job were rewarded with abuse in the form of police-state tactics and ul- timately, in an order of discharge. The appeal from the order of discharge is still pending. The :Injustices recited by this article, which are substantiated in great detail by the series of hearings currently being released by the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee, constitute a blight on our Government and the bu- reaucratic, cliquish factionalism into which we have permitted it to degen- erate. Both the Congress and the Amer- ican people have an obligation to Mr. Otepka to see that this injustice is righted, but they have an even greater obligation to themselves and their pos- terity to eradicate the defects in the system which j3ermit our Government to be so perverted. I ask unanimous consent that this article be printed in the RECORD at the conclusion of my remarks. There being; no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: se 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R0005000800.05-4 Approved For_Relekse2003/09/26_: GJARDP67B9D446RQ0050008000 July 27, 1965 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? A PrEIN 01.A. said more dams are needed to help in the low flow periods on the river. Warner pointed out that conditions change with the times. He said if the Tuscaloosa plant were to be built today it would be con- structed below the city, not at its present location. He also said. the Warrior Lock and Dam should have been located farther down stream below the industrial plants. Yoder pointed out that the new system at the Demopolis plant was constructed in spite of the fact that no immediate expansion is planned and that the mill was under no pres- sure to improve its waste disposal system. The system involved an investment of over a million dollars. Operating it and monitor- ing the river require an annual expense of $48,000. Dr. Myers said it was gratifying to see such a major step taken on .pollution. The mill, located about 8 miles south Of Demopolis, is surrounded by elaborate pohding and clarifying facilities each dedi- cated to the treatment' of a specific type of Waste water from the various stages ?of manufacture. Into one lagoon goes water that contains no harmful materials but Which needs to be cooled before returning to the river. In a secon?facility, a huge clarifier, 266 feet in diameter, removes solids such as wood fibers that. would otherwise "flow into the river. The third oPeration involves a 56-acre lagoon which impounds waste water contain- ing non-fibrous material from the wood that could be harmful to the stream. This effluent can be retained for periods up to two weeks, during which time its harmful properties are dissipated It is then metered back into the river at a rate determined by the flow of the stream. Even before water needed by the mill is ' sent to the waste treatment plants, it has been used over and over throughout the mill. The mill, uses 16 million Eallons of water daily, but if it were not for this recycling at various Stages of production, the demand would be 25 million gallons a day. Although no mill expansion is planned at Demopolis, the new waste treatment system is designed to take care of a greater future load. To the east of the mill a small lake allows the cooling of water that has become heated In condensing stearn produced in the chemical recovery section of the mill. This lagoon also serves as a safety check to guard against any mishaps that might endanger the condition of the river, Should such upset Conditions occur, a sensing system automati- cally sounds an alarms and shuts off the dis- charge valve at the lagOon. Tour million gallons of water can be processed daily here. Now covering nine acres with a 20-million-gallon capacity, the pond can readily be enlarged to 25 acres with 105-million-gallon capacity. On the opposite side of the mill is the clarifier which handles 10 million gallons of water a day. Water fed into this system- ' contains solid materials such as fibers, lime, and clays that have slipped through in the Washing, bleaching, and forming processes. Such materials, if allowed to flow into the river, would use up vital dissolved oxygen and create sludge beds. The clarifier is a huge, dish-shaped instal- lation, 266 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep at the center. Mill water is Pumped to the center surface, from which point it flows out- ward,tp the rim, spilling over the edges. In the Meanwhile, 99 percent of the solids have 'Settled tq, the bottom, where long scraper arms concentrate the sludge in the deepest part. Heavy-duty puinps then remove the sludge. These concentrated ,Solids are pumped to a nearby filter house where more water is removed, leaving a wet cake of solid material to be clumped in a nearby impoundment. At present there is no 'practical use for these solids, but experiments are being coriducted to see if they can be transformed into a useful byproduct. Behind the clarifier stretches the 59-acre Surface of the strong waste lagoon. Here is collected effluent that has a stronger con- centration of oxygen-absorbing materials. The wastes are held for a period up to 2 weeks, during which time areation and bac- terial action reduce the oxygen demand. At the end of the treatment period the water is released to the river at a carefully controlled rate. The strong waste system is designed to be modified as technical ad- vances are made in the field of effluent control. In addition to the three-way treatment system and the constant checking and double-checking that goes on at the plant, Gulf States technicians keep a close watch on the river itself. Daily checks are made on the river's flow and of the dissolved oxygen content of the water. In periods of low water this monitoring process becomes almost constant and the lab boat travels 50 miles downstream from the plant and 5 miles upstream. Samples of water are taken at 16 different points and 5 tests are made on each sample. The Demopolis mill was built in 1957 and produces up to 400 tons of gleaming white board daily, chiefly for the folding carton Industry. Repeal of Section 14(b) of the Taft- Hartley Act EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. LAURENCE J. BURTON OF UTAH IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, July 27, 1965 Mr. BURTON of Utah. Mr. Speaker, one of hundreds of letters I have received on the subject of repeal of section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act came from the Western States Meat Packers president, Mr, L. Elaine Liljenquist. I ask leave to have this letter, which outlines, the feel- ings of this important association, placed in the Appendix for the edification of my colleagues. WESTERN STATES MEAT PACKERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Washington, D.C., July 26, 1965. Hon. LATJRENCE J. BURTON, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. BURTON: Please vote against re- peal of section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act. This is the recommendation of the West- ern States Meat Packers Association. It is an American tradition not to force citizens to join any organization?lodge, club, church, association, or labor union. Freedom to choose for oneself is a prin- ciple which has been instrumental in making the United States the richest Nation on earth. Let's not give up this great freedom. Responsible labor unions win their mem- bership by constructive leadership. It is not esSential to the success of labor unions to have mandatory membership. Labor unions have continued to grow pow- erful under the Taft-Hartley Act. As you know, labor organizations are not subject to antitrust laws. Repeal of section 14(b) wohld give them an added monopoly to the detriment of the public welfare. Your vote against repeal of section 14(b) will be greatly appreciated. Respectfully yours, L. BLArNE LIMENQUIST, President and General Manager. 44) ig A4123 Cuba's EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. BOB WILSON OF CALIFORNIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, July 27, 1965 Mr. BOB WILSON. Mr. Speaker, un- der leave to extend my remarks in the RECORD, I include the following article from the San Diego Union of July 24, 1965: CUBA'S ROAD TO RUIN?CASTRO PROMISES BRING ENSLAVEMENT (EDrroa's NOTE.?The Very Reverend John J. Kelly, of St. Augustine's high school, San Diego, lived in Cuba from 1943 to 1959. For 9 years, until he was forced out by Prime Minister Fidel Castro in April 1959, Father Kelly was president of the Catholic university there.) (By the Very Reverend John J. Kelly) Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro cele- brates his 12th anniversary of his revolt on Monday. On 'July 26, 1953, about 100 idealistic young Cubans attacked a military barracks in Mon- cada, Santiago de Cuba, in an unsuccessful and apparently scatterbrained attempt to open armed hostility against the government of Fulgencio Batista. A small hard-core group escaped, including Fidel and his brother, Paul. They surrendered and their lives were saved through the intercession of the archbishop of Santiago, the Most Rev- erend Enrique Perez Serantes, The Batista government pardoned and ex- iled these conspirators in 1955, only to have the pardoned exiles return 18 months later from. Mexico for a new armed invasion, De- cember 2, 1956. The group of about 90 was detected and almost annihilated by the Cuban armed forces, but again, Fidel, Paul and the hard-core group escaped into the hills of the Sierra Maestra in eastern Cuba. There they managed to hold out for 2 years, while the Cuban people became in- creasingly dissatisfied with the Batista ad- ministration. Although Cuba was never so prosperous economically as in 1957-58, Cubans looked for someone to lead them in a political revo- lution to overthrow Batista. In spite of his known criminal record, Fidel Castro became accepted as the ideal leader for that revolu- tion, and he sat defiantly on his mountain top, very inacessible to the armed forces of Cuba, but readily accessible to that sector of the world press which wittingly or un- wittingly favors leftist causes. The vast majority of Cuban people sup- ported Castro then because he promised free elections, honesty in government and a re- turn to the constitution of 1940. These promises were deliberate, calculated lies, such as his shortwave clandestine broadcast: EVIDENCE LACKING "We are not a Communist group. The government accuses us of that to get your support; we are Cubans who hate Batista more than you do and want to get him out and restore free elections, honesty and the constitution to our nation." Much of the propaganda of. the Castro military victories was of like nature. There is no evidence that Castro won any decisive, large-scale military victory; there is much evidence to the contrary that the Cuban armed forces, by and large, were demoralized, corrupt and unwilling to fight. The victory over Batista was not Castro's so much as it was that of the Cuban people. Professionals, students, middle class and upper class were conned Into helping Castro. He had no proletariat, no union help. The Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Releas 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 4124 CONGRES TONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX July 27, 1965 .8. State Department formulated policy inch favored Castro Dyer 13a1ieta. RESULT CF, REVOLT What has been the result Of this "revolt" nd the one-sided poliy of the State Depart- drit7' In some 6 years Castro has parlayed IS 'easy Victory into a fun-fledged Soviet atellite, 90 mites from the U.S. mainland. For "Cubans this Soviet aggression on the rilericas has brought the same enslavement f the people, the same destruction, of a mind economy, :the same misery, hunger and eath that it has visited upon, the peoples of astern Earope and ciiina. 4so 'has brought to Cuba Soviet troops rid war Materills the t openly threaten the mi erity of the meric is, as well as a tactical raining center of subverefon aimed at ride rminng all Latin America.' Many observers thiak that the road the nited States chooses with caba will deter- me the fate of Latin America, and uiti- ate1y the fate of the United States. -,....????????????????11.... Hon. Cleveland M. Bailey =TENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. ROBERT T. SUREST . oF OHIO IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday, July 27,1965 Mr. SECREST. Mr. Speaker, on July 3, my friend, and our former colleague, he Honorable ,Clevel,e,nd Monroe Bailey, assed away. lie was born in St. Marys, . Va., and was a graduate of Geneva ollege, Geneva, Pa., an Associated Press ditor of the Clark-iburg Exponent, an ssistant State auditor, a State budget irector, a schoolteacher, and finally a ember of Congress for 16 years. From the day he came to Congress, the eMbership sensed, both Democratic and epublican, that here was a, man born to ead and not follow. He espoused clearly nd without fear tha principles and be- jets on which his political philosophy as based. As he sc often said, my first wo names should indicate the party of y choice. Cleveland Bailey was a kindly an under that outward rough exterior, nd his word was his bond. I can re- ember as if it were yesterday, when we alked of our respective States, that he old me, "Remember BOB, what is good or one part of your State is good for all he State, regardless of whether or not it your own district.' Many a freshman ember of Congress will recall his words f wisdom and guidance in their legisla- ive actions. The statute books bear evi- ence of his record in the Congress, and very child in Ames ica can thank him or his foresight in the field of education nd every working man can thank him or his friendship to labor. In the spring of 1965, Midwest City, kla., paid him tribute when he went here to dedicate the Cleveland M. Bailey chool. I can mentally picture him and agi.ne the personal pride he took in eing told that a school was being named his honor and that he was to make the edic ation. Every State in this great Union of ours nds a distinguished son to the Congress. eat Virginia can take great pride in now trig that it has contributed one of her sons to the Congress of the United so often and so bitterly that scarcely anyone State, iii the person of the late Hon- orablq Cl aVeland Monroe Bailey. Both symp thy to his wife, Maud, and his sons, Mrs. eciest and I extend pr deepest o Joslyn ax .d Donald, and his daughter, Wanda, and his many grandchildren. Paipar Jabs at Martin Carry Little Weight *XTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. J. ARTHUR YOUNGER IN OF CALIFORNIA E :SOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Yuesday, July 27, 1965 Mr. YOUNGER. Mr. ?Speaker, on Wednesday, July 7th, Mr. Thomas J. Foley of the Los Angeles Times wrote an article which was published In the Washington Post setting forth his views Fn the disagreement by Congress- man ATuunq with Chairman William McChesney Martin, Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. The, article follows: PATiviiirst JABS AT MARTIN CARRY LITTLE WEIGHT (By Thomas J. Foley) When_ W lliam McChesney Martin, Chair- man oi the Federal Reserve Board, was asked to conimer t the other day on Representa- tive WRIGHT PATMAN'S demand that he re- sign, a Smila broke across his face. Despite c ifferences, Martin said in all good humor i "I'm always able to maintain friend- ly relaidorn with Mr. PATMAN and I hope to continue to do so." "I'm alw Iys pleased," Martin said, "when Mr. PA.MA C shows interest in the Federal Reserve." 4 AL WAYS SHOWING INTEREST Marin. Cf course, was being a gentleman. But to hoss acquainted with him and his re- lations 'wit; Mr. PATMAN, the comment had a barb, bleause PATMAN, the 71-year-old Texas Democrat, who heads the House Bank- ing and Cu Tency Committee is always show- ing interes , in the Federal Reserve. Mart n's tone, and his smile, moreover, were sOmel hing more than condescending. And wdll tney might have been. For 4artin knew, and his immediate listen- ers knew, that despite PATMAN'S seniority? only three Congressmen in the 435-Member House have served longer than his 36 years? and deSpite PATMAN'S position as chairman of the , Banking Committee, the Congress- man's xlemind for Martin to resign carries about vs rr uch weight as the pages of the CONGRESSIO CAL RECORD on whioh it was printed. The incic ant serves as an example of how potentild power can be diluted, as PATMAN'S has ovek th3 years. KNOWS HIS STRENGTH It is d.out tful, of course, whether a demand from any Member of Congress right now would prompt Martin to resign. He knows his strength, which is considerable, and his standing in President Johnson's eyes, which is also donsiderabIe. This ls no reflection on PATMAN'S integrity, which ,is high, nor does it bear on the merits pf tis case against Martin. ,,ITTLE ATTENTION PAID ? What, it does mean is that PATMAN has re- buked rind berated big bankers in general and th Federal Reserve Board in particular Approved For Release pays much attention to him any more. Seldom a week goes by, it often seems, that PATMAN does not inveigh at length against them. The main thrust of his arguments is al- ways the same?that these groups want high interest rates and that these rates are the ruination of everything that is good. 'Again, whether this is true is beside the point. The repetition of the argument, and usually in strong uncompromising terms, has cost PATMAN his audience. RECOGNIZES PROBLEM PaTaxeux himself--to his credit?recognizes to some degree wbot the problem is. In the speech, he also said "think hard, think long, my colleagues. I am not making a plea for a pet peeve Of WRIGHT PATMAN'S." At another point, he said, "well, you will say, this is another one of PATMAN'S diatribes against William McChesney Martin?we have been hearing the same for many years." But his pleas went largely unheeded for that very reason--his audience has been hearing the same thing for many years. .-..1?=01111 One Man, One Vote EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. JAMES G. O'liARA ' OF MICHIGAN IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Tuesday.. July 27, 1965 Mr. O'HARA of Michigan. Mr. Speaker, the Michigan Democratic State Central Committee has officially gone on record in opposition to current legis- lative efforts to upset the Supreme Court's historic one-man, one-vote de- cision on apportionment of State legisla- tures. I thoroughly agree with the position taken by the State central committee and consider it a privilege to call to the attention of my colleagues the resolu- tion adopted by the committee on July 18. The resolution follows: RESOLUTION OPPOSING DIRKSEN AMENDMENT Whereas the Congress of the United States is presently considering Senate joint Resolu- tion 2, commonly known as the Dirksen amendment, propos:.ng an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to reverse the U.S. Supreme Court's one-man, one-vote decision, so as to authorize legislative apportionment on any basis in the second house of a bicameral legislature; and Whereas such proposal is contrary to all precepts of democracy assuring majority rule and equal voice in their Government to all citizens, without discrimination on account of race, sex, or residence; and Whereas such proposal is transparently but a smoke-screen to perpetuate malappor- tioned legislatures, which are not only un- constitutional and 'unfair, but also indiffer- ent and unresponsive to the needs of our citizens, particularly urban and suburban dwellers; and Whereas fair and affective people represen- tation has now been secured to Michigan by the courts; and our equitably apportioned one-man, one-vote legislature has demon- strated that people representation is respon- sive and responsible to the needs of all citi- zens, and such legislature has made dramatic progress in meeting the social needs of our citizens; and 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Ap3roved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Notroh 15, 196 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD :777 APPENDIX dents, Of the arts acLhtanit1es Would be bound to challenge. Is jazz any less an art form. than of serious, Modern muaic? Should enbists be sulasislize.d and CoralC strip artists ignored? Would Riley, if he were liv- ing today, be a fit subject for a Government grant, or would the money go to some long- hair poet? 'A n1 who hi better advancing the humani- tiee?the graduate student working on a subsidized thesis or the young writer learn- ing the hard way what humanity is all about? . The bill states in its preamble that "cle- =Crecy demands wisdom and vision in Its Wizens," and the President in. his, accom- panying message says "freedom is an essen- tial condition for the artist." , Those are two of the best arguments we know for finding other methods than Gov- ernment subsidies to aricoura,ge the arts and humanities. quillenge of Citizenship SPEECII or HON. EDWARD J. DERWINSKI Tr..,14-N01$ IN THE HOME OF nEMESENTATIVES Thursday March 11, 1965 7A/fr. DERVVINSKI, Mr. Speaker, in the recent :Noice of Pcmgcracy" con- test cOnaCieted by tile vetprap5 of For- eign Wars, an outstanding young stu- c;.e,:up 404 Fouith District of Illi- nois, 'Harry Wayne Sirnmon, represent- ed tile State of Illinois, , Hr tY is an outstandirg student at 1.4Y0116, TOWrishiR gigh School in La Grange, Ill., He and the other young Alen aig wpMen who,participated in this -year's "Voice ofi:ietiloctacY" contest are outstanding examples of the talented and dedicated young generation who will Mature to accept positions of responsi- bility in our society? am n pleased to insert iitto the itECORD at this point.the winning. ,speech of Jlar- --rY Sinkincgi'15 in talc, Minola ,VaiCe. of Democracy competition; . .Tux CITALizezmx. OF cjr.rzurisnr?. 1954-95 (By Harry Wayne Sinamon La Grange, Ill.) ? lIrcel've heard how Americans have 50 per- cent of the world's wealth and 7 percent of its people. We're lucky to be Americans, .-Agen't wey seenai we were born into a nee col.org-w.orld, 1r,tight now we're, proud Of our 'Country and our heritage. To this kind of talk I say, "Save it." I'm. ??*tarect of 1Koning to eulogies and., pride boasting speeches. Lit men rest on the past; let them lean againat the accomplish- ? Menta of their grandfathers and fall asleep. ?.1.0. this ehanging world, not advancing is, ? effec,t, failing backward. The freshness and vitality of America, these qualities dreve men to make us free, lie dor- shut 'up behind social whims,, cyni- 14 , and selfishness, ou_knew,,people who are talented and incluStrions, but if they do anything at all wit/ Piej.e attributes, it's only to gain ,power, or self-enjoyment. rppare,nt iI recent_political scandals d campaign rnudsllnging. Adult America has a sense of values brain- washed by the corruption and greed of a few. If there is a chance to save the freshness of AMerica, it lies with her youth. Herein is the challenge of citizenship. America's youth cannot-4e carbon copies of her adults. America's youth are willing and wanting right now to give and to create for some- thing they can call their own, and what bet- ter to sail your own than your country. But U their willingness is stifled, they turn de- linquent or withdraw into themselves or set up false senses of values. Just by using all his resources, without slighting ingenuity and imagination, an American can advance the welfare_ and prestige of his country most. The highly developed minds and bodies of American youth deteriorate in waiting for a chance to exploit their talents for a worth- while goal. Give youth a chance; give them freedom; challenge them with something worthwhile and they'll make America a hun- dred times greater than she already is. Perhaps you my that they have chances to work off exuberance for their country. Maybe they do. but it is not the accepted thing in their society because it is not the accepted thing in adult society. When you _hear a siren on the, streets, h,ow ma,ny cars aetually pull to the side of the road, much less come to a halt? What percentage of your adult friends really know the issues of politics and have formulated their own an- swers? II-Ow many times have you heard adults co lain about taxes? Moreover, how 'pitch are he letters "U.S.A." a part of your everyday Vocabalaryl? . Take stpck, friend. 7..op$ at Vag problem. Behold AmeriCa, she really ,progressing in spirit as she is in automation, economy, ? and population? Her youth can and shall carry on the spirit of America. then, is the challenge of citizenship for all Americans: for adults it is to set an example by laying cynicism aside and picking up the banner of vitality and plain, honest drive; for youth it Is to follow the example and exploit their natural freshness and naive courage. , There is a_bonsl betWeenMell which Emer- son called "the nimble air benign.' A is the universality of man, his need for love, for self-pride, for identity, maybe it's just con- science; but whatever it is, we can use it as a connecting agent to help us all know how to use our talents. But talent is noth- ing without courage and imagination to put these natural qualities to work?to work for America. The Symphony Comes to Middletown, N.Y. EXTENSION OF REMARKS HON. JACOB K. JAVITS OF NEW YORK IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Monday, March 15, 1965 Mr. JAVITS, Mr. President, a prime objective of my bill, Senate bill 310, the National Arts Foundation Act of 1965, is to encourage the living arts in communi- 'ties which otherwise would not have op- portunities to benefit from them. The _bill seeks to do this through State art councils and other nonprofit means. New York has had such a council since 1960; and it has succeeded admirably in working with such communities within the State. One such effort came to real- ization recently when the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra came to Middle- town, N.Y., and presented a concert, sponsored by the Greater Middletown Arts Council, in cooperation with other community agencies and the New York State Council on the Arts. I ask unanimous consent to have printed in the Appendix of the RECORD an article?from the February 23 issue of A1147 the Middletown Times-Herald Record? describing this achievement. There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: THE SYMPHONY COMES To TOWN (By Marian Feman) Manarrowx.?"Let's book a symphony this season. Let's bring a topflight symphony orchestra to Middletown. There's nothing quite like the big, full, thrilling sound of live music." ? One enthusiastic member of the Greater Middletown Arts Council convinced the other directors that a symphoni concert would add to the life of the area. The concert by the Minneapolis Symphony which Will take place at Middletown High School this Sunday afternoon at 2:30 was planned almost a year ago. But the price was high for a small city. Art, like other commodities in demand, costs money. The State arts council came to the rescue with a sizable grant. The local arts council paid its share of more than half the guar- antee, which was several thousand dollars. One hundred and 50 patrons gave additional support. Finally the contract was signed. Next came the job of filling those 1,600 seats at Middletown High School. The three arts council sponsors?the Mid- dletown school system, Orange County Com- =inlay College, and the Times:-Heralci Rec- ord went to work. ' Schools in three counties were contacted and students invited to attend for only $1.50. Music teachers talked up the value of hear- ing a live symphony orchestra. Four hun- dred student tickets, the maximum at this price, were reserved almost immediately. The press, radio stations, bill boards, or- ganizations, supermarkets, the libraries, and even city buses carried the musical mes- sage?"the symphony is coming to town." Adult tickets were scaled at $3 and $4.50. Soon the arts council's box office head- quarters, at the Record's switchboard, began to buzz with activity. Mail orders were re- ceived within a 40-mile radius. The program was chosen?Brahms' "First Symphony," Prokofiev's "Classical Sym- phony," and a contemporary work by Gun- ther Schuller "Seven Studies on Themes of Paul Klee:" Another artistic cover for Sunday's pro- gram was created by the arts council's artist, Dr. Fritz Blumenthal. His graphic designs are frequently offbeat and provocative. Ushers were recruited from the high school and from Orange County Community College. Those lucky enough to be selected will at- tend the concert free of charge. The time is drawing near for Sunday's concert. Last Minute details must still be taken care of. Dressing rooms for the con- ductor and the performers must be arranged for. One hundred chairs must be set up. The piano must be tuned. Lighting must be just right, with no glare to disturb the musicians. Early Sunday morning a truck will pull up to the high school, carrying 70 trunks of valuable instruments. These will be care- fully unloaded by professional stagehands. At 12:30 the orchestra members will arrive, and 2 hours later young Polish director, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, will raise his baton and give the cue opening the pro- gram. The artistic success of Sunday's concert, of course, depends upon the Minneapolis Symphony's performance. Behind the per- formance is months of diligent preparation by a large number of people?in the school system, in business, on the arta council? who have volunteered their services to bring more life, more culture, and more spark to the place where they live. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD APPENDIX March ew Castro Fortifications Ring U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo ? 2XTENSIO1 OP REMARKS OF HON. J. ARTHUR YOUNGER OF CALIFORNIA IN THE HOME OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, March 15, .1965 Mr. YOUNGER. Mr. Speaker, for me time I have be .?.n Concerned about 0 lack of inforrnati an on Cuba. I have ade inquiry of the State IDepartinent nty to be assured by the ASsistant Sec- tary of State that Cuba is in a mess nd that communism has been proven ndesirable for the American States. nly yesterday I her,rd the chairman of e P'oreign Relatiors Committee of the enate state that Castro- had been cut own to size, so it is really with great terest that I read .:ratnes Ilittle's ar- icle in the Sunday Star, Washington, C., of March 14. It seems to Me that we are paying too ittle attention to wt at is going on in the uss Lan Colony' which lies within 90 Miles t 'out shore. EW CASTRO FORTIFICATIONS RING U.S. NAVAL BASE AT GUANTANAMO (By James D. little) (Norz.?James 35. Hittle, a retired Marine &pa 'brigadier general, Who is director of atitnial security and foreign affairs for the , recently visited the Naval Base at tanamo.) ' TM spite a the wishful thinking that Cas- re-land is too expensive for Moscow's bud- et, the Kremlin is not pullitig out of Cuba. In:stead, communism is digging in for what ooks like a long and troublesome stay. That what I concluded Coming a recent tour of tratSgically plEiced Citantarairno Bay Naval ase on the southern tip of Cuba. 'Since last August, the Reds have been for- tifying the high ground surrounding the at base boundary. And this is not any amateur pick-and-shovel trench digging. It is a highly professional job, reflecting an un- Utual degree' of skill in the military organi- zation of critical ground. As a result of a tremendous engineering effort the Reds have cleared and smoothed a 300-, to 500--yard wide belt iabout 15 miles long.?coMpletely around the iand boundary Of the base. Jungle, rocks, and cactus have been "cleared. This provides 'a typical coni- rifunist-style death strip like those with Which the Reds hays scarred the dividing line 'between freedcin and Oppression in Europe. One of its purpose's is to prevent freedom-loving Cubans from seeking sanc- tuary in the naval base. To make the flight to freedom more difficult, the Reds have erected a wall of barbed wire down the middle Of the strip. It is about 7 feet high and three rows. wide. In itself it represents a heavy investment of money, material, and labor. But this is only part of the Red effort to seal off Guantanamo Bay. Behind the wire are the fortifications: Taese, in turn, consist of a genes of deeply ,embedded tiring positions. Each pillbox is caretilly located, taking full advantage of terrain, most of which is higher than the base area. TRENCHES SKILLFULLY LOCATED One' highly organized strongpoint consists of more than 20 separate firing positions. All the positions are placed to support each other with shields of fire that Cover approaches to adjacent positions. Connecting these firing positions am skillfully located trenches. These not only run along the front, generally parallel to he base boundary, but also ex- tend frc/m the rear of the line, thus giving covered rou tes of approach for troops and supplied. - - -Probtibly the most surprising and sig- nificant asp sot of these fortifications is their heavy enstruction. Each firing point (pill- box) is constructed with prefabricated con- crete, eptimated to vary from 3 to 6 inches thick. 'When embedded in the ground, only the gull port and low rounded roof pro- trude above the surface. With4glatses I could clearly see the pre- fabricated floncreta roof slabs being put in place. 'These are then covered by layers of poured 'con mete and earth, in a short time fast-grOwing vegetation will give hard-to- discern camouflage. Far Do ti e 'rear of the fortified line, land is being cl3ared for barracks. construction. Cost or Mit hostile fortification around our base is estimated at close to $15 million. When eomplete it will be one of the most intensiVely fortified positions in the world. I doubt that there is anyone in Castro's forces capable of planning and building such a skillful/ and massive network. The type of fortification, use of terrain-covered trenches and emphasis on fields of fire con- form t4 Soviet military doctrine. IMF/EMBER MISSILE CRISIS Why, this vast and surprising Red buildup? There 'is no one pat answer. Communist strategy is based on flexibility, the choice of Meth s--averything from propaganda to raw m Mary power. It appears that the fol- lowing, fac m's are involved In the Moscow- Havana decision to ring our, base with for- tifications. Mosciow srants Guantanamo Bay. The Rus- sian general staff knows full well, even if some lime/ loans do not, that our base is the strategic k( y to the Caribbean, the approaches to Panams and the protection of sea lanes essential to economic and military integrity of South America. Let us nont forget that one of the most consistent themes of Kremlin propaganci I is "kick the United States out of Guantmiarno." Neither Cuban Premier Fidel Castro nor Moscow las s forgotten their scare during the 1962 missile crisis when they were so vul- nerable to U.S. military action. An attack from Guantanamo Bay combined with air and sea assault from the Florida area, would have brokon the Red grip on Cuba. Russian military thought always has been extremely sensitive to an exposed tank. orrEnsury ROLE POSSIBLE If another threat of U.S. retaliation should develdp, Castro and his Kremlin overlords want to prevent the possibility that U.S. units from rtuaatanamo Bay might link up with other fore as and Cuban freedom fighters. Alsq, the new fortifications could perform a dual offensive-defensive role. If the Reds ever decic ed to attack the base, their best corridor cf attack would be down the long and broac plain of the 'Guantanamo River, which rime in the mountains in the north- west end flows in a southeasterly direction into the b ty. In Such tactical situation, Red gunfire from the fortifications, supplemented by ar- tillers) in the hills to the northwest, would try to/ immobilize our forces in the base in order to E ssist the armored attack down the plain, Tais would be in accord with the tactical doctrine for holding forces and ma- neuver fo ?ce. But tho Soviet tacticians must realize it mould no-; be a walk-in for ?shem. Navy and Marine u aits at the base, backed by carrier aviation had naval gunfire, would be doing somethin ;, too. SERVE PROPAGANDA PURPOSE It is m obabie, though, that the fortifica- tions are intended to serve a more immedi- ate piopa,gaxida role. Approved For Releas 15, 1965 'Taking advantage of our well-known de- sire for peace, the Reds could deliberately create a war-threate aing crisis. Then, to the tune of worldwide propaganda, they could offer to negotiate. When the timing is right from their standpoint they can increase ten- sion by firing a few shots and publicly re- enforcing troops in the fortifications. Their investment in these new fortifications will pay dividends in military credibility. This, in turn, they expect, will give added leverage in negotiations. Tribute to John W. Macy, Jr., Chairman of the Civil Service Commission EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. RALPH YARBOROUGH OW TEXAS IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Monday, March 15, 1965 Mr. YARBOROUGH. Mr. President, an excellent tribute to the new Chairman of the Civil Service Commission, Mr. John W. Macy, Jr, appeared in the March 10, 1965, issue of the Government Employees' Exchange. Because of Mr. Macy's most remark- able accomplishments, ability, and vigor- ous talent, I request that the article be printed in the Appendix of the RECORD. There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: MACY'S REAPPOINTMENT AS CSC CHIEF AP- PLAUDED BY 'FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Federal employees everywhere in the world are commending President Johnson' for reap- pointing John W. Macy, Jr., to the chairman- ship of the Civil Service Commission for a 6-year term. Merabers of the Senate Post Office and Civil Service Committee, in con- firming him for the post on March 4, made audible the expressions of pleasure felt by Federal careerists, male and female alike, physically able and partially disabled alike, by majority and minority groups alike. Readers of this newspaper if they haven't, by this time, become intimately acquainted with Mr. Macy, his personality, and his re- markable work history, with the inspiration he inculcated in every Federal department and agency in the Government, with the vigor he has supplied every one of the talented careerists in the Federal service, to- gether with his tireless energy to attract the talented into the Federal service, then this newspaper has not done a good job. At 47, his career has just begun. 'When this re- markable man sleeps no one will ever know. Those who know him never cease to wonder where he unearths his drive, how he amasses his wisdom for fair play, when he gets the time not only to perform his responsibilities but to express himself in the many profes- sional personnel 'ournals, which this news- paper has been fortunate to accumulate. He arrives at his office in the wee hours of the morning and leaves it with a bulging brief- case at night. Members of the Civil Service Commission staff' having business with him one day not so long ago said "you have to catch him on the run. He's on the move practically all of the time." The Exchange, in 1961, recorded for its readers just prior to his confirmation, that he "would go any- where and do anything" to improve the lot of Federal employees. As careerists well know, he has demonstrated that he meant those words, and as daily continuing to do so. Several months ago, this newspaper specu- lated to itself if the unsupported rumors that 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 A1188 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? APPENDIX March 15, 1965 To SSE "P-disa, Lzr's FACE IT - For the past fag;ds Herald readers have - beet/ getting a close inside look at Commu- nist Cujia. Cair Latin. A. can Ohm', Al Burt, spent 8 weeks on the ? ? uttered island, the longest - stay of any nonresident American corre- spondent since the Castro takeover. His dispatches, which will continue to appear for some time, are detailed and revealing. The picture is grim. Cuba is a tota4 police state. Controls are more severe than in any other Communist country. The block warden system has the - entire populace spying on one another. The penalty for dissent is drastic. A re- cent OAS report Said one-sixth of all Cubans have OM the. in.side of a Castro jail since 1959. An estimped 94,000 political pris- oners Ogre ngaw in ?ustody, -There is no Vsible external or internal - force that seems likely to bring about Cas- tro's abrupt dowhfall. ' the whole Cuban nation is transformed into an instrunient of Communist policy. Its niekning for the United States and the - free wOrld is ain't:rang. ' Cuba is available to Russian military power, to strike at the 'United States from the roar in any world confrontation. It is the dagger of subversion aimed at Latin America, a Clear and ever-pr sent danger to every _democratic government in the hernispliere. But more sinis.ter and Subtle is the indoC- -trinAign ,of gi.,gineraikkri. Of Cubans With a hate-An/erica vis. The entire rOlice State, reports Mr.-turt, IS dedicated to the destruc- tion of American ideals: , . . . . .Th&. threat fiorn the Red island m4es it hard to ,understand bow a well-known ,4riter- icau. *newspaper can look with complacency, 0,a It, 1414 this, week, on what it, considerk the forward thrust of the Cubant revolution. , It puts a strange cast on the willingness of anti-Communist Spain to put profit above principle and become Cuba's chief supplier outside the Red bloc. -The 'administration in Washington shows it tender/Cy to shove the Cuban problem into the baeli diawer 'and hope for the best while giving top priority to other foreign crises to the point of risking war. The plain .fact is that Red Cuba is part 774 .a.sngle problem that Must he faced in , bbean alhi 'sbiitheitst , ; 1.(rt'4 dispatches show that Cuba is npt , side Issue of the Cold war but ?a star 4et in corniniiiiienes three-ring' circiis. To ignore that is a risk we Carihot afford. There may never be a free Cuba again unless we face that fact and act on it. mat Falls EXTENSfON OF REMARKS HON. JOEL T. BROYHILL :TR v,419119-* ? -_ IN TEE Irovsp OF REPRESENTATX17gS Mouds?yMarch 15, 1965 Ur. BROXIIILL of, Virginia. Mr. Speaker, an excellent poem written by Mrs.": Marlene Latimer Bondurant of Alexandria, Va., has been called to my attention as it was published in the Falls Church (Va.) ?Sun-Echo in the editor's Words and I quote: Boodinint's poem about Fairfax Countys beautiful Great Falls is indeed timely what with President Johnson's avowal to preserve the historic Potomac River val- ley's natural beauty and grandeur. I commend this work to my colleagues in the Congress of the United States. GREAT FALLS (By Marlene Latimer Bondurant) Along the Potomac Palisades With endless surge all night and day The misty-eyed river cascades Splashing midst snow-white foam and spray While in the sun pink dogwoods bask, Creating a scene so picturesque. Art and Aid EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. WILLIAM S. MOORHEAD OF PENNSYLVANIA IN ..TIU I-I01.T8 OF ItEPRESENTATIvEs Thursday, March 4, 1965 Mr. 1V1OORHEAD. Mr. Speaker, in the last 5 months I have addressed a num- ber of gatherings of professional prac- titioners of the arts and humanities in various parts of the country. To each of these gatherings I have stressed my belief that there is a fundamental change"developing in the attitude toward intellectual and cultural life in the United States and that the time is right for the Federal Government to take steps to encourage this changing atti- tude. This has been one of my argu- ments for establishment of a National Foundation for the Arts and Humani- ties, as proposed in the modified Moor- head bill, H.R. 6051, introduced in the House last week. In a 'recent editorial, the Christian Science Monitor made the point that the artist needs to be honored in his own land. This is true, of course, for the humanist too, and for all teach- ers. I think the National Foundation for the Arts and Huinanities would point us in that direction. I include the Monitor editorial of March 2, 1965, at this point in the Appendix: - ART AND Am While the 13ritish Government is raising its support of the arts by 30 percent, the American Government remains virtually at the beginning of doing anything for them at all. We welcome the burst of activity bespeak- ing Congress belated concern for the arts and the whole field of humanities. Government patronage in the realm of hu- mane values may have more pitfalls than its already substantial patronage of the sciences. But, in a society changing under the minis- trations of the scientist, the insights of the artist and the scholar have become more necessary than ever. The time is overdue for the American Government to define its role in developing a climate for excellence in artistic as well as technological fields. In legislation for education and research, the humanities should not be penalized be- cause their benefits may be less tangible than the visible achievements of science. Among nonprofit institutions such as museums, the- aters, and symphony orchestras, there could Well be Government support as expenses rise in proportion to what the public can be ex- pected to pay. The splendid achievements of private initiative must not be allowed to dwindle for lack of the necessary boost as economic conditions change. The problems of administration would be difficult. How to separate the worthy from the unworthy on artistic rather than political grounds? How to keep the scholar or insti- tution from tempering the work to what it Imagines to be acceptable at a given moment instead of striking out in directions that may be more important in the future? The United States would certainly not go the way of the Soviet Union where Govern- ment support and control go together. It would go in the direction of those European nations that have managed, to a large degree, to keep support and control separate. In Britain, for example, the newly allocated funds will go to the Arts Council, which pro- vides a kind of buffer between the arts and political influence. Some such body would presumably be cre- ated in the United States if Federal aid to the arts goes ahead. Indeed, President John- son has already appointed an Advisory Coun- cil on the Arts. It is an estimable group, but stronger on what might be called estab- lishment names than those further out, where 'nevi- ideas, good and bad, often arise. It hints at the problem of creating an ad- ministering body that would not inhibit the very creativity it was set up to foster. And, with constituents' money involved, does any- one doubt that Congressmen would be look- ing over the shoulders of an avant-garde that might seem to be involved in things even less probable than going to the moon? Such questions would become more urgent if Federal aid should extend to individual artists. The great ones will survive in spite of Government as well as because of it. Others might forgo the potential break- through in favor of the project thought more likely to get a grant. Indeed, if Government patronage is added to that of the foundations and the universi- ties, some artists might be cut off from the human experience that gives substance to art. Against such considerations must be placed the possibilities of enriching the public with more ,works and performances freed of com- mercial limitations. Ironically, as Congress awakes to the arts, the country is in the midst of a "cultural explosion" without con- gressional patronage. Judiciously administered aid is necessary. But its effect will be diminished if the Gov- ernment fails to show a sensitivity toward the differences between the arts and other things. More than money, what the Govern- ment needs to give the artist is a sense of be- ing honored in his own land. Pacific Northwest Floods EXTENSION OF REMARKS ? OF - HON. AL ULLMAN oRtdoist THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, March 8, 1965 Mr. ULLMAN. Mr. SPeaker, one of the major concerns throughout the flood- damaged regions of the Pacific North- west is for the immediate repair or re- construction of forest access roads. Tim- ber processing is the leading provider of Industrial payrolls in the region, and it is of the utmost urgency that authority and funds be granted to complete the job on federally managed forest areas. The following resolution by the Ore- gon Logging Conference emphasizes the importance of this problem: OREGON LOGGING CONFERENCE, Eugene, Oreg., March 8. 1965. Hon. AL ULLMAN, House of Representatives, Washington, D.0 . DEAR REPRESENTATIVE ULLMAN : The 27th annual session of the Oregon Logging Confer- Approved Fpr Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R0005000800054 Marfh .15, 1965 clutiblt to prOvide the type of comprehensive medic I care to which our rietercins' are en- ' Why?' ' "'Sufficient highly ' trained and skilled profesSiOnal personnel cannot be per- stiaclecl to actept-paitions in these areas, nor is the ,provision Of expensive facilities atid er itipmerit Xeatible..* The 1VA. has drawn a 'list oi' Whatlt regards as 19 'essential professional serviced" which shotil be "reasonably available" to hospital- ized v s. Such as radiation treatment; heart singer ; and psychiatric services: 4ssnirrrIA4 pgrivioas Of t e hospitals - slated for closing, it says, the o in F',ort Bayard, N. Mex., is able to pro- vide o ly one of these services; Dwight, Ill., and t e Broadview Heights Division of the Brecks ille, Ohio, hospital, three; Miles City, Mont., four; Grand Junction Colo:, six; Bath, N.Y., even; Rutland Heights, Masa., eight; and C der Point, N.Y., McKinney, Tex., and Sunm unt,,N.Y., nine. . Onl the VA hospital in Linco:n, Nebr., rates igh on this score. It can provide 14 of th 19 essential servicer. But the VA wants to _close the Lindoln facility on grounds there already are 350 excess beds in the area up chiefly to the fact that so many vets ae moving away. . Dr. rem, a prOfessor of medicine at the tlniveilsity of Southern Cal fornia, says the VA's 3-member Snebial Medical Advisory Groupi which he heads has expressed strong suppo t for-the changes proposed. ' , The group is made up of 16 physicians, a social worker, a dentist, a psychologist, a nurse? a sociologist, a hospital direCtor, and a nutritionist. ' NOT .?Dr. Thomas H. Brem, proIessor Of medic ne at; the University Cf Southern Cali- fornia s School' of Medicine and chairman of the V 's Special Medical Advisory Group, a body f or:n*1e medical experts established by la to advise the VA on the treatment of Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIO sick a d disabled veterans. Al, RECORD APPENDIX A1187 Mr. Ketzenbach',r straightforward, down-to- earth analysis is .nost salutary. Immigra,tigin liroposaLs always open the door to the bogeyman of unemployment. The adminis ,ration billyould permit the ad- mission,of only "7/00 more iminigriintri than are authorized under existing law. But be- cause of 'Ur Nt ay in which immigration quotas are nurroatly rigged?so that many go unused pees use assigned to countries whose citizens have Ilo desire to comehere-- there would 13er:1.3...actual increase of approXi- Mately 60,00p intmigrants over the number now admitte ea 'r.h year. As M. IKe.tzenbach pointed out, thir. would amount, in relation to the American internal populaticn growth of nearly 3 inill on each year, to 9 percent. He refers to this as "an infinitesimal price to pay for our own advancement arid advan- tage." In sirnple truth, it should be reckoned not as a "pribe" it all but as an enrichment. The simpt, cc ntral point about the pro- posed ?chang s Is. immigration policy is that they wouldA3c) away with the national origins quota quo syste ?a meanly racist basis of se- lection?and pui In its place a selection dil the basis of killi useful to the'United States. The old syst4m, is the Attorney General said, "ought to b intolerable on principle alone. We must be col caned with the quality of persons, not of pedigrees." Immigrants with skills to contribt te to the American economy will, as producers and consumers, help to keep that economy in high gear. : Immigration Ch,inges TENSION OF REMARKS OF HI N. PETER W. RODIN?, JR. OF NEW JEESDY IN E HOUSE OF RDPR ZSENTATIVES Monday, March 15, 1965 Mr RODINO. Mr. Speaker, the Marci 11, 1965, issue of the Washington Post contains a fine editorial calling attention to the excellent testimony whicl Attorney General Katzenbach prese4ited last week in support of the im- migr tion revision legislation now under consi eration by our Judiciary commit- tee. The editorial Clearly and Concisely poin out the central purpose of the legisl tion and the benefits, both actual and ? tangible, which it will bring to the Natio . It deserves consideration by all Mem ers of Congress and I am pleased to h ye the editorial included in the RECO D: /11IMIGRATI0N CHANGES If y u want to know precisely what changes Would be made in American innhigration policy by the immigration 3111 which Presi- dent eimedy sent to Congress, read the At- tome General's statement cf last Wednesday to th House Judiciary Committee: It sets forth in simple, lucid, nor rhetorical terms just hat the bill would do and what it would, not do. In view of some of the non- sense that has been uttered recently about opening the floodgates to immigrant hordes, Rev. John J. Reeb EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. GEORGE M. RHODES OF PENNSYLVANIA IN THE 111:1?USE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thurisclair, Febriary 18, 1965 Mr. RI-10DES of Pennsylvania. Iktn Speaker, last Friday I suggested that American flags be flown at half-mast to express th l ation's sorrow over the death of the reverend John J. Reeb in Alabama,'ho gave his life in the cause of humah 4ghls, dignity, and freedom. Lowerin the flag would also be an expression ,of shanie for the events in Alabama, tirheie the courageous clergy- man was a vic;im of ignorance, bigotry, and hate, a natural reaction to the breakdown of civilized government in that State, Where the murder of innocent men and the killing and crippling of little girls goes unpunished. The GoVernar of Alabama and his police-state tactics have seriously dam- aged the iniag3 of the United States in the free wcirld and have given the Com- munists a jpowerful propaganda weapon. Our Nation mourns today with a widowed miather and her four fatherless children. et us hope that the recent brutal killing will encourage the good citizens of Alabama to cleanse their State of (Oficial lawlessness, brutality, and national shame. Over the years, Mr. Speaker, Alabama has been represented in both Eouses of Congress by dedicated Representatives, of whom thle people of that State and the Nation are mighty proud. Let us give Encouragement to the de- cent white eiti2ens of that State who last week marched to the courthouse in Sel- ma to exprss i sense of outrage at offi- cial miseonduct, police 'brutality, and suppression of the rights of citizens. The leader of the group of 72 white citizens which made the courageous march was Joseph Ell wanger, chairman of the Concerned White Citizens of Ala- bama. As white citizens of Alabama?Ell- wanger said: We have come to tel the Nation that there are white people in Alabama who will speak out against the events which have recently occurred. By our presence we affirm our faith in the abiding principles upon which our Nation is founded?a nation un- der God with liberty and justice for all. Mr. Speaker, if the recent tragic event In Selma will awaken the consciences of Alabama citizens, Reverend Reeb will not have died in vain. ust Not Forget Red Cuba While We Worry About Vietnam EXTENSION OF REMARKS OF HON. PAUL G. ROGERS ' OF FLORIDA -IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, Mar:* 11, 1965 Mr: ROGERS of s Florida. Mr. Speaker, while the American people have their attentions focused on the conflicts building up in Vietnam, and pressure builds as international news dispatches carry developments as they occur by the hour, the problem of communism in Cuba continues to plague the stability and security of this hemisphere. We cannot allow our national atten- tions to be diverted from one Communist- initiated crisis to another, to be drawn into the position of constantly reacting, In Cuba, for example, while authorities ponder solutions to Vietnam, Fidel Cas- tro has been readying a new wave of subversion and terrorism in Latin Amer- ica. This is typical of the tactics which the Communists employ as they attempt to further their purposes throughout the world. Americans must not relent in their ef- forts to replace liberty where it has been deprived through communism. Ameri- cans must dedicate themselves to the constant effort of effecting the downfall of Communist Castro and the denial of rights he has placed on the island of Cuba. The risks are too great to over- look the fact that Cuba is of vital stra- tegic importance to communism. We need only to recall the events of October 1962, when the world looked on while the United States held to demands that missiles be removed from this hemi- sphere, to know the treachery of com- munism. One of Florida's leading newspapers, the Miami Herald, which certainly ranks as a distinguished authority on events in the Caribbean and Latin America, artic- ulated the problem of overlooking Cuba In the face of Red-inspired pressures elsewhere in a very succinct manner on . March 5. I include the Herald editorial of that day in the Appendix of the REC- ORD: Approved For Releas 2003/09/26 : Clk-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Release 2003/09/26 CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005- CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE Mr. EhLSWORTH. Mr. Speaker, I alk unanimous consent that this bill be passed over without prejudice. The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Kan- sas? There was no objection. , GREAT EtRITA:mr SUPPLYING CUBA vrk'n- tnttiox wovra OP CERTAIN EQUVIVrENT Ro Td. (Mr. GERS f ri a a., e and was givenPerniislion to address the House ?for: 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.) Mr. ROOERS of Plorida. Mr. Speaker, s, all of us have been shocked by the news that great Britain has' entered. into an agreernerliWitliCominimiSt Cuba to sup- ply thein with $10 Million worth of equipment: GreatBritain, knowing that it is the Oficial policy of this Govern- merit.and he nations of this hemisphere to isolate Cuba, has seen fit to ignore this policy. I think it is higlitiine for this Govern- ment to take actio li to show its displeas- ure. The _beSt.?107y to do it is for this Congress itself to Cake aCtion by passing fi-14111 that has been introduced to close the porta of this gation to the ships of any government Which allows US ships to trade with daft'. If We were to close the ports of this Iqation to the British ships until they Stopped this shipping to Cuba We Wouhf haVe a quick reaction and we fpu,ld quickly isolate Cuba and . get rid of Castro and his Communist governnient in Cuba. 4 1 Ti R, 1RIVA CALENDA The SPEAKER This is Private Cal- -- endar day. The Clerk Will call the first bill on the Private CalcOdar? ALEXANDER HAYTKO The Clerk called the bill (HR. 6092) for the relief of Alexander Haytko. There being no objection, the Clerk read the bill, as follows: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of Ameriqa in Congress assembled, That the limitation on the time within which appli- cations for disability retirement are required to be She'd under section 7(b) of the Civil Service Retirement Act (5 U.S.C. 2257(b) ) is hereby waived in favor of Alexander Haytko, Los Angeles, California, a former employee of the Department of the Air Force, and his claim for disability retire- ment under such Act shall be acted upon ' under the other applicable provisions of such Act as if his application had been timely filed, if he files application for such dis- ability retirement within sixty days after the date of enactment of this Act. No ben- efits shall accrue by reason of the enact- ment of this Act for any period prior to the . o Enr Tonts, INC. , The Clerk called the first bill on the Private Calendar (H'it- 2360), for the relief of the Out14t Stores, Inc. Mr. AIBER$0 ,? Ur. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that this bill be passed over without prejudice. The .*.4011: Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Illi- nois? There was no o14jection. ? _ R. AND MRS. ABEL GORFAIN The, Clerk called the bill (H.R, 2'706) ? for the relief of Dr. and Mrs. Abel Gor- f Mr. CrgOSS: Kr. Speaker, I ask unan- imous consent that this bill toe passed over Without prejudice. The 813EAKElt, Is there objeciton to the request, of the gentleman from Iowa? date of enactment of this Act. SEC. 2, Notwithstanding any other pro- vision of law, benefits payable by reason of the enactment of this Act shall be paid, from the civil service retirement and dis- ability fund. , The b,ll wa,s,ordered to be engrossed and rea a third time, was read the third time, and passed, and a motion' to re- consider was laid on the table. CAROLINE G. JUNGHANS The Clerk called the bill (H.R., 8878) for the relief of Caroline G. Jurighans. Mr. HEMPHILL. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that this bill be passed over without prejudice. The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from South Carolinc,? There was no objection. ESTATE OF PAUL F. RIDGE ? The Clerk called the bill (H.R. 4361) for the relief of the estate of Paul F. Ridge. There being no objection, the Clerk read the bill, as follows: There Was no Q jectian. Be it enacted by the Senate and HOUse ? 6f ReprgSentatives of the United States of _ ___, ,44nter/ca' in Congress assembled, That the ' CHARLES WAV ELY _WATSON, JR. Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and ' . 'The Clerk calle$ the bill (Ha. 2728) - Treasury not otherwise directed to Pay' out of any niOnef in the appropriated, to Paul for the rclief Of harles Waverly Wat- H. Ridge and Hilda Ridge Neill, as executors son, Jr.. ., _ _ , of thp cptate,cf Paul F. Ridge, who died a r,, dprr .. g. )vir Speaier, i ask resident of Alaraance County, north' Ciro- unanimPUs congept tbq this bill be Una, On "July 15, 1957, the sum of $5,581.28, passed over 31,1 th9ot 'pre odiee. -With interest thereon at the rate of 6 per rentum per annum from October 15, 1958, to The Is there objection to date the da of payment under this Act. The the request of the gentleman from payment of such sum shall be in full settle- /S/C.8.539,414ett8? - moot ?Lail claims of said estate against the tthere as rio O - -United States for refund of Federal estate , .er onnusly paid by reason of the in- .911, ?Wit s.s.tge .:of -El I Al*. JAI wIllefi e 5-alf aul.' P.-Ridge-held callY a' CouttsY iranterest- plus interest: Provided, That no El.1 .part of the amount appropriated thereof shall sAcet lieu- i. , n excess of n , per cenu h m 9f ll be 'paid or delivered to or received by any agent -ThCjrk'.a , for the rilief, tenant, U.S. Navy. rcived January 8 or attorney on account of services rendered in connection with the enactment of this Act, and the same shall be unlawful, any contract to the contrary notwithstanding. Any person violating the provisions of this Act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined In any sum not exceeding $1,000. With the following committee amendment: Page 1, line 9, strike "October 15, 1958" and insert "May 31, 1962". The committee amendment was agreed to. The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, was read the third time, and-passed, and a motion to reconsider was laid on the table. ROBERT E. McKEE GENERAL CON- TRACTOR, INC., AND KAUFMAN & BROAD BUILDING CO. The Clerk called the bill (H.R. 4972) for the relief of Robert E. McKee Gen- eral Contractor, Inc., and Kaufman & Broad Building Co., a joint venture. There being no objection, the Clerk read the bill, as follows: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized add directed to pay, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to Rob- ert E. lVIcKee General Contractor, Incorpor- ated, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Kaufman and Broad Building Company, of Phoenix, Arizona, the SUM Of 41.145,2C3. The payment of such sum shall be in full settlement of all the clatias Of n'otert E. McKee General Con- tractor, Incorporated, and Kaufman and Broad Building Company, against the United States, remaining unpaid, for certain addi- tional amounts due on account of work per- formed under a contract (nuihbered AF 20 (602)-636) with .an agency of the United States (dated September 24, 1959) for the construction in connection with the housing project built under title VIII of the National Housing Act at Selfridge 'Air Force Base, Michigan. The necessity for payment of ad- ditional amounts under the contract arose because of unforeseen expenses resulting from errors in the topographical survey, but such payment could not be made On account of the statutory per-unit ceiling contained in sec- tioa 505 Of the Act SA. September 28, 1951 (65 Stat. 365) : Provided, That no part of the amount appropriated in thia Act in excess of 10 per centum thereof shall be paid or de- livered to or received by any agent or attor- ney on account of services rendered in connection with this claim, and the same shall be unlawful, any contract to the con- trary notwithstanding. Any person violat- ing the provisions of this Act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in any sum not exceeding $1,000. With the following committee amend- ment: Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert: "That notwithstanding the per-unit cost restrictions of section 803(b) (3) of the National Housing Act, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1748(b) (3) (B), or any statute of limitations, jurisdiction is hereby conferred on the United States Court of Claims to hear, determine, and render judgment on the claims of Rob- ert E. McKee General Contractor, Incorpo- rated, and Kaufman and Broad Building Conwany, against -the 'United States, for cer- ? tarn- additional. amounts de on account" of work performed under a contract .(numbered AF20 (602)-636) with the United States dated September 24, 1959, for the construction in conneation with the housing project built R:kr Release:2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R00050008000?- , Approved Fizr.R,eleas 2003/09/26.: CIA-RDP_67800446R000500080054 CONGitES raNTAt notyst ? ten 1y eicCessive use of overtime causes .incased unemployment. So, 'therefore, r csinalkiend leglilation'authorliing the ere Oen of tripartite industry commit- tee to ,..'4eterrnhae, on an industry-by- Industry basis, as to where a higher penalty rate for overtime would increase job openings without unduly increasing cos ?and authorizing the establish- mezrt of such higher rates. Lt me make one principle of this a Migration abundantly clear: All of thee increased opportunities?in em- plo ment, in education in housing, and in every field?must be, open to Amen- can. of every colqr. As far as the writ of ederal law will run, we mUst abolish not some but all racial discrimination. Flor this is not merely an economic iss e?or a social, political or interna- tlorjal issue. It is a moral issne?and it mu $t be met by the passage this session of tie bill now pending in the House. I members of the public should have equ 1 access to facilities open to the public. All members of the public should be qually eligible for Federal benefits tha are financed by the public. All me bers of the public should have an equi I chance to vote fcr public officials, a ? to send their child:en to good pub- lie chools, and to contribute their tal- ent to t tie public good. day Americans of all races stand sid ? by side in Berlin and in Vietnam. Th :y died side by side in Korea. Surely the can work and eat and travel side by 'ide in their own country. e must also lift by legislation the bar of discrimination against those who see entry into our country, particularly tho e with much-needed skills and those joi ing their families. In establishing pre erences, a nation that was built by the 'mmigrants of all aiads can ask those whc now seek admission: "What can you do for our country?" But we should not be asking: "In what country were you born?" For our ultimate goal is a Ix orld with- out war, a world made safe for diversity, In hich all men, goods, and ideas can free y move across every border and every bou4adary. e must advance toward this goal in 196 in at least 10 different ways, not as partisans but as patriots. First, we must ma ntain--and our - red ced defense budget will maintain? that margin of military safety and su- periority obtained through 3 years of steadily increasing both the quality and ? the 'quantity of our strategic, our con- venfional and our antiguerilla forces. In 1964 we will be better prepared than ever before to defend the cause of free- don?whether it is threatened by out- .eigl aggression or by the infiltration practiced by those in Hanoi arid Havana i wh ship arms and mer across interna- ton 1 borders to foment insurrection. An we must continue to use that stre gth, as John Kennedy used it in the Cub n crisis and for the test ban treaty, to emonstrate both the futility of nu- clea war and the possibilities of lasting pea e. S collet, we must take new steps? and we shall make new proposals at Bro. 2-13 de-neva?tm aid the contra, and the eventual aboltion of arms. Mlven in the abience of agreement we must- not stockpile arum beyond our needs or seek an excel of military power that could be Provo atiee as well as wasteful. And it is in this spirit that in this fiscal year we are cittiag back our production of enriched uranium by 25 percent. We el are shutt ng down four plutoniumepiles. We are cising many nonessential mili- tary ins ails tons. And it is in this spirit that we today call on our adver- saries to do ,he same. Third, we must make increased use of our fooll as an instrument of peace, making 0 aeailable?by sale, or trade, or loan oil donation?to hungry people in all nations which tell us of their needs and accept proper conditions of dis- tribution, Fourth, wo must assure our preem- inence in the peaceful exploration of outer space, focusing on an expedition to the meon in this decade?in coopera- tion with, ott er powers if possible, alone If necessary. Fifth, we must expand world trade. Having rqcog nized in the act of 1962 that we must puy as well as sell, we now ex- pect our tra ling partners to recognize that we Must sell as well as buy. We are willing to give them competitive access to our market?asking only that they do the same for us. Sixth, we must continue, through such measures' as the interest equalization tax as well as the cooperation of other na- tions, our reel nt progress toward balanc- ing our inter rational accounts. This admit istration must arid will pre- serve the pretent gold value of the dollar. Seventh, we must become better neighbors with the free states of the Americas?w irking with the councils of the OAS, wi h a stronger Alliance for Progress, ani with all the men and Women a this hemisphere who really believe in liberty and justice for all. Eighth, we must strengthen the ability of free nations everywhere to develop their indepen lence and raise their stand- ard of tivin g?and thereby frustrate those who prey on poverty and chaos. To do this, the rich must help the poor? and we must do our part. We must achieve a mc re rigorous administration of our development assistance, with larger roles for private investors, for other industrialized nations, and for in- ternational agencies and for the recipi- ent nations themselves. Ninth, we must strengthen our At- lantic and Pat ;Mc partnerships, maintain our alliances and make the Vnited Na- tions a more effective instrument for na- tional independence and international order. Tenth, and finally, we must develop with our allies new means of bridging the gap between the East and1 the West, facing danger boldly wherever danger exists, but being equally bold in our search for now agreements which can enlarge the t opes of all while violating the interests )1* none. In short, I would say to the Congress that we must be constantly prepared for the worst am1 constantly acting for the best. 105 We must be strong enough to win any war, and we must be wise enough to pre- vent one. We snail neither act as aggressors nor tolerate acts of aggression. We intend to bury no one?and we do not intend to be buried. We can fight, if we must, as we have fought before?but we pray that we will never have to fight again. My good friends and my fellow Ameri- cans, in these last '7 sorrowful weeks we have learned anew that nothing is so enduring as' faith and nothing is so de- grading as hate. John Kennedy was a victim of hate, but he was also a great builder of faith, faith in our fellow Americans, whatever their creed or their color or their sta- tion in life; and fa:th in the future of man, whatever his divisions and differ- ences. This faith was echoed in all parts of the world. On every continent and in every land to which Mrs. Johnson and I traveled, we found faith and hope and love toward this la:ad of America and toward our people. So I ask you now, in the Congress and in the country, to join with me in ex- pressing and fulfilling that faith?in working for a nation?a nation that is free from want and a world that is free from hate?a world of peace and justice, and freedom and abundance, for our time and for all time to come. [Applause, the Members rising.] At 1 o'clock and 16 minutes p.m., the President, accompanied by the commit- tee of escort, retired from the Hall of the House of Representatives. The Doorkeeper Escorted the invited guests from the Chamber in the follow- ing order: The members of the President's Cabi- net. The Chief Justice of the United States and the Associate justices of the Su- preme Court. The ambassadors, ministers, and charges d'affaires of foreign govern- ments. JOINT sEssIam DISSOLVED The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint session of the two Houses now dissolved. Accordingly, at 1 o'clock and 18 min- utes p.m., the joint session of the two Houses was dissolved. ? The Members of the Senate retired to their Chamber. RECESS The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the House in recess until 2 o'clock. Accordingly (at 1 o'clock and 25 min- utes p.m.), the House stood in recess. REFERENCE OF PRESIDENT'S ? MFSSAGE Mr. BOGGS. Mr. Speaker, I move that the message of the President be referred to the Comraittee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered printed. The motion was agreed to. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 iliaproved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 140 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE munist country? This is especially dis- tressing in view of Secretary preeman's ad- mission to the wheat subcommittee that he had denied preferential treatment to at least one free-world customer a few days before he granted the bargain to Russia. The best price friendly countries have re- ceived recently was 59 cents on December 19. In his testimony Secretary Freeman 'also admitted the bargain to Continental was not on a competitive bid basis, and indeed, so far as he knew, was the only bid for durum wheat that day. What is the au- thority for granting preferential treatment to Continental? I respectfully repeat my request that the export license be suspended until question- able legal aspects are clarified and until conflicts in statements by your two Cabinet officers are resolved. PAUL FINDLEY, Member of Congress., I challenged the legality of the trans- action in a letter Monday to the Comp- troller General, Joseph Campbell. The text of my letter follows: DEAR MR. CAMPBELL: I would appreciate a report at the earliest possible date on ques- tionable legal aspects of the export transac- tion announced Friday by the Department of Agriculture, involving the sale of about 13 million bushels of Durum wheat to Con- tinental Grain,Co. for resale to Russia. 1. It appears-to me that the Department of Agriculture exceeded its authority in granting an abnormally high export sub- sidy in this transaction.. The rate paid was 721/2 cents a bushel, 141/2 cents a bushel higher than that granted for recent exports of the same wheat variety. In fact, the Wall Street Journal today re- ports as follows: "Underlining the abnor- mally big subsidy on the Durum destined for Russia is the fact that on December 30 the Department refused to pay a 59-cent sub- sidy on 110,000 bushels, and on Friday re- fused to pay 73 cents on 37,333 bushels. These smaller export deals were for Durum to be exported to free world destinations." Most news reports explain the abnormal export subsidy as an indirect subsidy to cover part of the cost of ocean shipping. The Associated Press on January 5, report- ing the Continental Grain transaction said, "One Department official questioned about the possibility that the Durum subsidy in- cludea both an export and a transportation subsidy denied flatly that there was a trans- portation subsidy. But another said the Department does not contend that no in- direct transportation subsidy is involved." These questions arise: Does the Department of Agriculture have the legal authority to grant preferential treatment in establishing export subsidy rates on durum wheat? It is quite clear that Continental Grain Co. was singled out for this special rate. This preferential rate was not announced publicly to the trade in ad- vance, and since the announcement of the Continental transaction, the preferential rate has been withdrawn. Did the Department of Agriculture seek competitive bids before granting the abnor- mal subsidy? If not, why not? Does the Department of Agriculture have the author- ity to grant subsidies on commercial ship- ping beyond U.S. ports? If so, does the Department of Agriculture have authority to include an indire,q trans- portation subsidy in establishing_ an export subsidy rate? It is my understanding that the authority for establishing export subsi- dies can,not Inc l4cle the cost of transporta:- tion beyond U.S. ports. If the hidden reight subsidY is construed to be legal, is the Government guaranteed a refund if the freight subsidy is not needed In its entirety? 2. It appears that the Department of Com- merce violated its own published regula- tions in issuing the export License for this transaction. I call your attention to Export Bulletin 883 of the Commerce Department, issued November 13, 1963, which requires each ex- port license application must be accompa- nied by form PC 842. This form must list the quantity, value of commodities involved, and numerous other details. Was it prop- erly filled out in advance of the issuance of the license to Continental? From what I have learned, it appears impossible that this requirement could have been met. This question arises: Did the Commerce Department have the legal authority to waive regulations in issu- ing the export license to Continental? Prompt attention to this request is in the public interest, as this bizarre transaction, if not challenged, may be cited as the prece- dent for future deals. Sincerely yours, PAUL FINDLEY. Text of my telegram on Monday to the President: Respectfully urge that you suspend the ex- port license to Continental Grain Co., which Friday received an abnormally high export subsidy for shipment of durum wheat to Russia, until questionable legal aspects of the deal are clarified by the Comptroller General. PAUL FINDLEY, Member of Congress. THE OTTO OTEPKA CASE UP TO DATE (Mr. HOSMER (at the request of Mr. REERMANN) was granted permission to extend his remarks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous mat- ter.) Mr. HOSMER. Mr. Speaker, on De- cember 30, last, the respected American Security Council issued a paper prepared by its Washington bureau chief, Frank J. Johnson, bringing up to date the facts on the Otto Otepka case. Because of its important relevance to the national security, I have asked the paper be here reproduced in full as follows: THE CASE OF OTTO OTEPKA On September 23, 1963, a long-smolder- ing issue broke into public view when the State Department served notice on the Chief of the Evaluation Division of the Office of Security, Otto Otepka that is proposed to fire him for actions unbecoming to an of- ficer of the Department of State. On No- vember 5, 1963, Otepka's answer to the charges was disregarded and the action was carried out subject to appeal and review by Secretary Rusk. The reasons given for firing Otepka are based mainly on charges that he cooperated with the Senate Internal Security Subcom- mittee (SISS) in the course of its still continuing investigation into State Depart- ment security procedures. The real reason, however, apparently lies in Otepka's obsti- nate and conscientious effort to do his job too well. In trying to keep persons of ques- tionable character or affiliation out of sen- sitive Government positions, he made a nui- sance of himself in the eyes of his superiors. In placing loyalty to country, as he saw it, above institutional loyalty to the State De- partment, he violated the latter's code. In the eyes of State Department officials, he is out of step with the times. Mr. Otepka is a professional security of- ficer and a good one. He came to the State Department in 1953 as a personnel security evaluator under the late Scott McLeod. In January 8 1960 his State Department efficiency report noted his long experience with and extreme- ly broad knowledge of laws, regulations, rules, criteria, and procedures in the field of per- sonnel security. He is knowledgeable of communism and its subversive efforts in the United States. To this he adds perspective, balance and good judgment. This was the last efficiency report he received. His knowledge for correct procedures and insist- ence that they be carried out was to lead to his undoing. On January 20, 1962, Otepka was down- graded froin Deputy Director of the Office of Security to Chief of the Evaluation Division. This Division has authority to clear persons who do not, in the judgment of its Chief, warrant an adverse ruling. Where there is derogatory information, the case is required to proceed through higher channels; any higher official may overrule the Evaluation Division and grant a clearance, but only the Deputy Under Secretary for Administration may concur and suspend the individual. After hearings are held only the Secretary of State may actually separate the man. This procedure has particular application to Otepka, because it concerns a security case in which he was importantly involved? that of William Arthur Wieland. In part, this case is responsible for Otepka's troubles. These difficulties really began in 1959 when the new Director of the Office of Security, William Boswell, a Foreign Service officer who was not a security expert, announced that he was going to eliminate the "McLeod image." Scott McLeod had been the first Administrator of the Bureau of Security and Consular Affairs until 1957. McLeod's strict procedures succeeded in eliminating many security risks from the State Department, though apparently at some cost to the "mo- rale" of a number of Foreign Service officers. Boswell proposed to place Foreign Service of- ficers in a position to check on other Foreign Service officers?an arrangement to which Otepka objected in principle. Otepka personally worked on two major personnel security cases?John Stewart Service and William Wieland. Service had been separated from the State Department in 1950 for turning over documents to Philip Jaffe, publisher of Amerasia magazine (a definitely pro-Communist publication) . He was ordered reinstated by the Supreme Court in 1956. In readjudicating his case, Otepka found that he was not a loyalty risk, but raised questions as to his judgment and con- duct. Service was subsequently cleared on all counts and sent as consul general to Liverpool. He retired in 1961. Wieland was a State Department desk officer who had a hand in shaping U.S. policy toward Cuba, both before and after Castro's takeover. To his superiors, he was an apologist for Castro, although he told friends privately as early as 1958 that Castro "is a Communist." A full security check was done on Wieland in response to an allegation that he, himself, was a Communist. Otepka's conclusions did not support this charge, but did raise ques- tions as to Wieland's integrity, based in part on falsehoods in his testimony before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee. Nevertheless, Wieland was "cleared" by Roger Jones, Deputy Under Secretary for Adminis- tration. He did so in September 1961 on the basis of only the "digest" of the Wieland findings, without first obtaining the recom- mendation of the intervening head of the Bureau of Security and Consular Affairs, and without notifying the Office of Security of his decision. Not until January 25, 1962- 1 day after the Wieland case was raised at a Presidential news conference, was Otepka notified in writing by Boswell that Jones had, in fact, closed out the Wieland case. Otepka objected to these irregular procedures. In the Service case the procedure in clearing him had at least been correct; not so in the case of Wieland. Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 196 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R0005000802,W74.? CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE prese t parks superintendent, Earl Gaylor, and . COnmaission chairman, Sam L. Good. Mr. Wirth, or "Connie" as a few fortunate local citizens are privileged to call him, has had proud, distinguished public ,career and a he voluntarily retires from the De- part ent of the Interior, he does sa with the well- ? eserved approving applause of millions of gr teful people, which We hope will touch his h art and in some way reward him for his I felong dedication to the parks and peopl of America. After retirement, in Janu ry, we earnestly hope Mr. and Mrs. Wirt will more often visit Wheeling, enjoy our riendship, continue to give us wise coun I as our parks become increasingly value le each and every year, and rest corn- forta ? ly in this appreciative community. [From the Roanoke Times] A PUBLIC SERVICE W:YI,L DONE OTIG of this Nation's most important assets Is its liational park system which comprises some 00 areas, including 3:. parks, and cov- ers 26 million acres. Each year the system draws 100 million Americans to enjoy its benefits. On of the men chiefly responsible for all this i Conrad L. Wirth, who has just retired after 2 years as Director of the National Park Servic . Mr. Wirth literally grew up with the Park erviee, having been with it in all but the SSt 15 of its 47 years of existence, and he de erves a great deal cf credit for the Servic 's popularity both :.n Congress and amon Americans generally. The familiar Mission 66 program designed to gre tly strengthen the national park sys- tem uas conceived by Mr. Wirth, who then dilige tly worked for its approval and saw it well ola its way to fruition when be stepped down. In this section of Virginia, with its great national forests and popular Blue Ridge Parkway, Mr. Wirth is widely known and h s work appreciated. Prai e for the Park Service comes from Sena r BYRD, who said, in commenting on Wirth s retirement, "I regent the national park ystera as one of the most worthwhile of all ederal programs." And Senator BYRD paid t is tribute to Mr. Wirth in remarks on the Sc ate floor: "I suspect there is no other single man in the United States who has done o much for the healthful recreation and p ease:ire of so many people, along with prom ing conservation of our natural re- source and preservation of our historic areas.' In retirement as well as during his more ctive years, Mr. Wirth has earned the gratit de of millions of Americans. [From the Conservation News, published by he National Wildlife I'ederat.on] Mrs lox 66 A TESTIMONY TO VISION OF "TOWNIE" WIRTH As r ported in the November 1, 1963, issue of Co servation News, Conrad L. Wirth, Di- rector of the National Park Sercice since 1951, i retiring from office :n January 1964. torn n 1899, "Connie" Wirth had already logged many accomplishments and many years .f park experience when he became Direct r. He has been a dedicated crusader, puttin his whole heart inco the preserva- tion o the parks, at the same time maintain- ing th t "parks are for people." Wirt directed the Civilian Conservation Corps, first the State and c3unty work and then t e Department of the Interior's entire CCC p :ogram. This, it has been said, ad- vance the Nation's park program by at least 0 years. In 1936, 1.e initiated the move ent which resulted in passage by Con- gress ? the Park, Parkway and Recreational Area S udy Act. But the crowning achieve- ment f his career is Missian 66, the dra- matic and hnaginative Nat onal Park Sys- tem development program which caught the attent n of the public and won the support of Co ress by the magnitude of its design. In the 1 years following World War H, a deep concer a for the National Parks plagued Conrad Wir h. The parks were deteriorating. They had suffer ed through the lean war and postwar yeaks. Appropriations had been cut to the bone, all but absolutely essential work had stopped, and staffs had been trimmed fci mere skeleton forces. Yet, in the postwa yee re, droves of visitors flocked to the parts. Their impact hastened the deterioratio . , Mearly, something had to be done to cal' [Iteration to the plight of the parks. It as then that Wirth conceived a fresh and oi4jective idea of park development, and he gave it the name of Mission 66, to o commemorate l 'ark Service. 11 1966 the 50th anniversary of the Nati Wirth nained a special task force which enunciated ;the following guidelines: Preser- vation of park esources is Et basic require- ment; substential and appropriate use of the National Perk Eiystem is the best means of assuring the per aetuation of the System; and adequate and aapropriate developments are required for pu3lic use and appreciation of any area, and for prevention of overuse. From this beE inning, the goals of Mission 66 evolved ap: Better public accommodations and serviceS; campgrounds, roads and other improvements provided by the government; a more adequate, better-trained staff; effec- tive presentntio i and interpretation of the historic and nE tural scene; acquisition of needed park lands; cooperative planning for a national recreation program; and preser- vation of Wilderness and the historic and natural scene. The parks: already accommodate more vis- itors than the lumber planned for by 1966. The original: goals are now reachin; achieve- ment, and Will continue under a new long- range plan -Ice provide for constantly growing demands. Thus, Misaion 66 is a vital force that will leave its mar* up on the National Park System and Service; This, in turn, will remain an enduring tettimany to the vision and dev tion of Conrad e..... Wirth. i i BRITISH BUS. DEAL WI U- NIST CUBA PROVES "BUST" OF AD- MINISTRAITON'S ANTI-CASTRO TRADE POLICIES , (Mr. CR.O.MliiR (at the request of Mr. BEERMANN): WES granted permission to extend his ,renr.arks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous mat- ter.) I Mr. CRAMM. Mr. Speaker, the British bus de 11 with the Cuban Com- munist Government proves what a com- plete "bust!' the administration's efforts to isolate, . through trade restrictions, Castro's islitnd fortress have been. Our lack of real determination to pro- vide needeid nadership to accomplish trade restrirtio as is best evidenced by the administra ion's failure to protest this deal. This, deal could be accomplished only with the 3ritish Government's ac- quiescence.; The opening of an office in Havana by the British firm, Leyland Motor, Ltd., rpecifically required ap- proval by dash o and the British. Such a sale, with an operating office in Havana, am mnts to tacit recognition of the Captro government by Great Britain and leads to the logical question, "Is this the first step toward normaliz- ing trade rela ,ions with Cuba, toward eventual recognition?" This is an example of the natural after- math of the administration's push for trade of wheat with Russia on credit be- cause Greait Britain can logically ask, 139 "what is wrong with our trading buses with the Communists when the U.S. Gov- ernment is trading wheat on credit with the Communists?" It is obvious that the wheat on credit deal has undercut the strength of our moral position calling for trade restric- tions against Communist Cuba in the eyes of the world. We are reaping the harvest of this clandestine compromise already. The press report covering this bus deal, from the Washington Post of Wednesday, January 8, follows: CASTRO MAKES BIG BLS DEAL IN BRITAIN MIAMI, January 7.?The Fidel Castro gov- ernment announced today a $10 million deal with a British firm in an effort to rehabili- tate Cuba's broken-down bus system. Havana Radio said the agreement calls for early delivery by Leyland Motor, Ltd., of 400 buses with 45-passenger capacity each and $1.1 million in spare parts. The broadcast, monitored here, said the British firm announced it will establish an office in Havana with commercial and tech- nical personnel. In Washington, officials said the adminis- tration has told Britain it is unhappy with the sale but has filed no formal protest. They said the administration was aware of negotiations between the British firm and Cubans, and had been in touch with the British Governfnent on this and other sales to Cuba for a long time. ARE TAXPAYERS FINANCING WHEAT SHIPMENTS TO RUSSIA? (Mr. FINDLEY (at the request of Mr. I3EERMANN ) was granted permission to extend his remarks a.: this point in the EC RD and to include extraneous mat- Mr. FINDLEY. Mr. Speaker, to what extent are the U.S. taxpayers financing bargain rate shipments of wheat to Rus- sia? The strange secretly concluded deal with Continental Grain Co. for ship- ment of Durum wheat to Russia, just an- nounced last week, leave many questions unanswered. Today I sent this telegram to-'resi- dent Johnson: On Monday I requested that you suspend the export license to Continental Grain Co. for shipment of durum wheat to Russia until questionable legal aspects are clarified. My request is even more urgent and per- tinent in light of conflicting statements yesterday by two members of your Cabinet. The American people are deeply concerned about this strange new policy of using U.S. tax dollars to finance trade with the Com- munists and are entitled to know which Cabinet officer has the facts straight. Agriculture Secretary Freeman stated yes- terday to the House wheat subcommittee that the 72-cent subsidy approved for Con- tinental did not include a subsidy for ship- ping. Mr. Freeman described my ques- tioning on this point as spurious. The sam.e day Commerce Secretary Hodges told a press conference it was his under- standing that the shipping subsidy was in- cluded and was the reason why Continental got the abnormally high subsidy. As the officer responsible for issuing export licenses to Communist countries, Secretary Hodges certainly should know what he is talking about. If the shipping subsidy was included, what is the legal authority for this? If no shipping subsidy was included, what authority and justification can be given for granting preferential treatment to a Com- Approved For Release' 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Apiaroved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 308 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD - hOUSE ? sfon for which it is more valuable. At the same time the owner would be able to sell his rice acreage allotment and put other land into the production of this commodity. I just wonder if by the great expansion of the Space Program in the State of Texas we have not twice enriched the rice producers. Does this Mean mounting surpluses at the expense of the taxpayers when the sale of land for nonfarm purposes could otherwise curtail production? Mr. Chairman, I have very serious Questions about the whole philosophy of this program. The CHAIRMAN. Under the rule, the Committee rises. Accordingly the Committee rose, and the Speaker having resumed the chair, Mr. DAvis of Tennessee, Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, reported that that Committee having had under considera- tion the bill (Hit, 3742) to amend the provisions of the Agricultural Adjust- ment Act of 1938, as amended, relating to the transfer of producer rice acreage allotments, pursuant to House Resolu- tion 570, he reported the bill back to the I-Iouse. The SPEAKER. ,Under the rule, the previous question is ordered. The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill. The bill was ordered to be engrossed And read a third time, and was read the third time. The SPEAKER. The question is on the passage of the bill. ? The bill was passed. A motion to reconsider was laid on the table. Mr. JONES of Missouri. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 570, I ask for the immediate consideration of the bill (S. 1604) to amid the Provisions of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, relating to the trans- fer of producer rice acreage allotments. The Clerk read the title of the Senate bill. The Clerk read the Senate bill, as follows: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress casembled, That sub- section (f) of section 353 of the Agricultural Mjustment Act of me, as added by Puhlic Law 87-412, is amended in paragraph (3), clause (1) thereof, by adding immediately following the word "acquire" the language ", except for land," and by striking out the language ", and any land owned by the transferor to which any of the transferred rice history acreage may be ascribed". The Senate bill was ordered to be-read a third time, was read the third time and passed, and a motion to reconsider was laid on the table. A similar House bill, H.R. 3742, was laid on the table. o.rowamoaritwaiMOP.....*??????".' GENERAL LEAVE TO EXTEND Mr. JONES of Missouri. Mr, Speaker, I Ask unaniMmiS PenZent that all Mem- bers have 5 legislative days to extend their remarks on the bill, H.R. 3742, to amend the provisions of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 relating to the transfer of producer rice acreage allot- ments. The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Missouri? There was no objection. EMERGENCY COMMITTEE FOR D ASTER RELIEF TO CUBA (Mr. WILLIS asked and was given Permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.) Mr. WILLIS. Mr. Speaker, on Decem- ber 16, 1963, shortly before the first ses- sion of the Congress adjourned, a two- column, page-length ad in the Washing- ton post appealed, "in the spirit of Christmas," for contributions to the Emergency Committee for Disaster Re- lief to Cuba, with offices at 41 Union Square West, New York City. The ad revealed that the chairman of the organization was Sidney J. Gluck and the medical director, Dr. Louis Miller. The contribution coupon in the ad stated that checks should be made payable to Elizabeth Sutherland, treas- urer of the group. The ad further re- vealed that the three initiating sponsors of the appeal were Mrs. Ava Helen Paul- ing, Carleton Beals, and Waldo Frank. The names of 80 cosponsors of the Emer- gency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba were listed in the ad. Among them were 20 clergymen, 7 professors, a judge, 10 doctors?medical or Ph. D.'s?a paint- er, a sculptor, and some attorneys and writers. It was quite an impressive display. And this display, coupled with the state- ment in the ad that the Emergency Com- mittee for Disaster Relief to Cuba "is a nonprofit organization formed by a group of U.S. citizens for the purpose of carry- ing out a humanitarian, nonpolitical mis- sion," probably succeeded in eliciting large contributions from readers of the Washington Post who thought they were helping a worthy cause. I wish that the full facts about this organization and its appeal could have been made public the very day the ad appeared in the Post, or within a day or so after its appearance. Unfortunately that could not be done, but it is still im- portant that the facts be given, that the public knows who is behind this organi- zation, how and for what purpose it was formed. The tact of first importance is that the appeal in the ad was a hoax, a phony. It was completely unnecessary. It was made to serve not the suffering Cuban People, but the evil designs of their op- pressors, the enemies of freedom and humanity in this hemisphere and the en- tire world. Before I spell out the hoax in. this ad, however, I would like to state for the rec- ord some of the facts about the people who are the initiators and leaders of the committee and thus responsible for plac- ing this Communist-serving ad in the Washington Post. Sidney J. Gluck, chairman of the or- ganization, was identified as a member of the Communist Party by Mrs. Mil- January 14 dred Blauvelt, an undercover informant for the New York City Police Depart- ment, when she testified before the Com- mittee on Un-American Activities on May 3, 1955. She stated that he was a member of the Flatbush Club of the Communist Party and, in 1944, was cred- ited with recruiting 54 new members for the party. Gluck has served as an Instructor in the Communist Party's major training institution in the United States, the now defunct Jefferson School of Social Science. As treasurer of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, he was subpenaed to testify before the Com- mittee on Un-American Acivities on No- vember 14, 1962, in the course of the committee's investigation of that group. During his appearance, he invoked the fifth amendment when questioned about present as well as past Communist Party membership. Dr. Louis Miller, medical director of the Emergency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba, was also medical director of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. The Committee on Un-American Activi- ties was unsuccessful in its attempts, made over a period of many weeks, to locate Dr. Miller so he could be sub- penaed to testify in its hearing on the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. Testifying before the Committee on Un-American Activities in executive ses- sion in 1951, Louis Budenz, former mem- ber of the Communist Party's national committee and managing editor of the Daily Worker, stated that he had met Dr. Miller during the 1940's at enlarged meetings of the Communist Party's na- tional committee. A 1948 report of the Committee on Un-American Activities stated that during the 1940's Dr. Miller was one of the "principal New York con- tacts" of Soviet espionage agent, Arthur Alexandrovich Adams, who is known to have had information about the atom bomb in his possession when he escaped from the United States. Dr. Miller began his "medical aid" role In the Communist movement during the 1930's when he served as chairman of the Medical Aid Bureau of the American Friends of Spanish Democracy, a cited Communist front. Elizabeth Sutherland, a senior editor for the publishing firm of Simon & Schuster and treasurer of the Emer- gency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba, was also treasurer of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. Miss Suther- land was subpenaed to testify before the Committee' on Un-American Activities last year in the course of its investiga- tion of illegal travel to Cuba. She ad- mitted in the course of her appearance that she had been a member of, and had made a number of speeches at meetings of, the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. She also admitted having signed an ap- peal to Great Britain to grant asylum to the late Dr. Robert A. Soblen, who had jumped bail and fled the United States after being convicted of spying for the Soviet Union and sentenced to life in prison. Miss Sutherland, who had been granted validation by the State Depart- ment for travel to Cuba, testified that Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Releas CONGRES ay pasaed the ?the! body by unani- s consent some mcnths ago. en the cominittee was considering It, here was no objection raised; and as I r ad the report of the committee and as note the opposing views, it impresses m that the opposition' is to the farm pru gram as a whole rather than to this m aaute Which seeks only to cure an in qiiity and Which applies to a small Sc:et, perhaps not over 10 percent, of he rice Producers in California, Texas, So th Car&Zria, and parts of Louisiana. e basic legislation which passed in 19 2 provides that if a rice producer per- M nently withdraws from the business, he may transfer his acreage history to ther producer or producers provided sells his entire rice fanning equipment any irrigation not perinanently Ched to the rani; The difficulty a ses Over the furtherpreVisier that he m at sell any land to which the produc- t' n rice is ascribed. In the States Co caned, the-allatient is not ascribed to the Iand and so confusion exists over th wording which found It way into P bile taw 412r of the 87th Congress. ?1,17e you: "an eitainDle of just one in quay Which the present situation has d eloped, let us take the example of a f mer who owns 1,000 acres of rice land d who has, himself, a 100-acre allot- nt to which he has become entitled to On smite ,niece cf land other than ovrii. Then suPpOse he decides to nel Ve this 100 acres on to his own prop- y and to rent to 9 other farmers 100 crs each. Anyone g the nine others rent- Of the rice- business merely &posing Orhis arotment according PUblic Law" 4121iiit the Man who hap- ns to own the iifee:e of land involved has sell the land. This was never intended in the original islation. It is not the wishof the Lte- rtment of Agriculture. It creates a est hardship on the landowner; d should most certainly be corrected: That is all that ig involved in this islation---simnly the correction of an r. RIVERS of South 'Carolina. Mr. airman, I rise today to give my whole- arte4 support to H.R. 3/42. This bill uld return an element Of free enter- p lie to the ii.efd of rice production. It ould pe nitproducers nd longer in- rested in raising -rice Co- tran.sfer their laments to perhor s who deL wish to Ise rice, but would no longer require em to also sell the land involved with ese allotments. In effect, the land and e allotment -would no longer be indel- ly attached to each other. This bill is of great significance to the uth Carolina low country. At one t ue, Charleston was the rice center of t e /lotion. Indeed, rice production be- n in Charleston. The first field of rice America was planted there and, for arty years, rice planting was an enif- eritly succestful has ness in that area. In later years, other businesses re- laced rice in the low cOuntrY. But the tential remains. There are those in y district who wish to reviVe rice plant- g near Charleston; they feel that it ill be a million-dcllar business. But rst they must be able to purchase these 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080105-4 ICNAL RECORD HOUSE 397 now-um/ed rice allotments--allOtments which are presently attached to lands which tle owners do not wish to sell and the pro ecttve producers do not wish to buy. H. It. 3742 would remedy this situa- tion to the E atisf action of all concerned. I am sire the problem I have just out- lined is tot ,:onflned to the Carolina low country alone; it is found wherever rice is?or vviis--raised. H.R. 3742 is the an- swer. 1 urg?. all Members to support its Passage.' Mr. LEG(1ETT. Mr. Chairman, the bill before you authored by the distin- gtiished , gentleman from Texas [Mr. CLARK THO vison] , should generate no debate because it is a measure that helps the little man and costs the Government and taxPayers nothing. If you, are going to assume the unreal- isticticle atti u that you disfavor all supply- manage er t programs and you do not want aty program improved to give growers more freedom at no taxpayers' expense thm close your ears and vote against this bill. On the other hand if you think it was right back in 1938 that rather than give an allotiment to a feudal r.,ce landlord that the allotment in fact be given to the tenant, then you should support this bill. ' As yclu recall we are currently sup- porting, six crops: Feed grains, wheat, cotton, tobacco, peanuts, and rice. CCC losses for the period 1.954 to date: Corn,' $2.1. billion, CCC losses, 10 years. Wheat, $4.4 billion, CCC losses, 10 years. ' Grain serghum, $604 million, CCC losses, TO years. Cotton, 31.3` billion, CCC losses, 10 years. Rice--rough, $964,000, CCC losses, 1962-6T. Frojebtec losses on all commodities for the cur: ent year are $995 million. In rite Ye determined in 1938 that it Was to the tdvantage of the entire coun- try that we not overplant this commod- ity.' Rice 'represents a potentially surplus comincidity when supply management has bean successful. First; Costs have been minimal. Secotd. We are planting 98 percent of the allOtmilnts. Third. We have protected the little tenants. The cur .ent bill would further pro- tect thp te nant because it would allow him to biKT an allotment without being saddled with an expensive land pur- chase. (Rice land is extremely expen- sive.) Ty enty-five years of operation has seth no precedent for other commod- ities. * Tod y, as a result of the 87th Congress legisla ion if a landowner-producer watts to get out of rice production he can fit'st, lie and his allotment is sev- ered from the land and goes to his fam- ily; seeone, he can sever a portion of his allotment and give it to members of his family' third, he can break up a part- nershik; fourth, he can sell his whole allotment, his equipment, and land. If he his no family he cannot retire from rite unless he dies or gets rid of his farm. A tenant has this flexibility and so should the landlord. Many land- lords have two kinds of allotments? some affixed to the land and some not so. The rules should be made uniform. As a practical matter it is better many times to rotate rice land, and this is another reason to support this bill. At the present time in my State the only way for anew farmer to get into rice is to: first, buy a whole farm; sec- ond, buy a tenant allotment and lease; and, third, obtain a. new farmer 30-acre allotment. I believe farmers in the last two categories should be encouraged and thus I would ask your support for this The CHAIRMAN. The Clerk will The Clerk read as follows: Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That sub- section (f) of section 363 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as added by Public Law 87-1412, is amended in paragraph (3), clause (1) thereof by adding immediately following the word "acquire" the language except for land," ii,nd by striking out the language ", and any land owned by the transferor to which any of the transferred rice history acreage may be ascribed". AMENDMENT OFFPRED BY MR. FINDLEY Mr. FINDLEY. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment. The Clerk read as follows: Amendment offered by Mr. FINDLEY : On page 1. line 5, strike lines 5 through 9 and insert in lieu thereof the words "is hereby repealed". Mr. JONES of Missouri. Mr. Chair- man, I make a point of order against the amendment on the ground that it is not germane to the bill. The CHAIRMAN. Does the gentle- man from Illinois desire to be heard on the point of order'? Mr. FINDLEY. Yes; I do, Mr. Chair- man. Mr. Chairman, the title of the bill makes it clear that it is to amend the pro- visions of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, as amended, relating to the transfer of producer rice allotments. The amendment that I have offered simply changes the subsection which is a part of the seclon dealing with the transfer of producer rice acreage allot- ments. The CHAIRMAN (Mr. DAVIS of Ten- nessee). The Chair is ready to rule. According to section 2949 of Cannon's Rule of Procedure, I read: To a bill amending a law in one particular, an amendment repealing the law is not germane. The Chair rulee, that the amendment is not germane. The point of order is sustained. Mr. RYAN of New York. Mr. Chair- man, I move to strike out the last word. Mr. Chairman, as a city representative I am somewhat lo it in this maze of Alice in Wonderland :tam legislation, But something struck me as I read on page2 of the report on H.R. 3742 the letter from the anonymous representative of the Department of Agriculture in which it appears that one reason for this bill is to permit some owners of rice producing land to sell their land for urban expan- 2003/09/26 : CWRDP-67B00446R000500080005-4 1964 -1, ? A. -she haat seen a number of other Ameri- cans at the Cuban Writers and Artists Congress which she had attended while in Havana in August 1961. She refused, however, to identify these persons for the committee. Basil Pollitt, legal counsel for the Emergency Committee for Disaster Re- lief to Cuba, was also legal counsel for the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. Over the years, he has been active in various Communist fronts and has served several terms as a member of the board of directors of the New York City chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, cited by the Committee on Un- American Activities as the "foremost legal bulwark" of the Communist Party. Years ago he admitted to an investigator for the Committee on Un-American Ac- tivities that he attended meetings of the Young Communist League while a stu- dent at Harvard. He denied, however, that he was actually a member of the group. Mrs. Ava Helen Pauling, like her hus- band Linus who was one of the cospon- sors of the ad, has been active in Com- munist-initiated peace agitation for a considerable number of years. Some of the well-known Communist fronts with which she has been associated are the American Committee for the Protection of Foreign Born, the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, the American Con- tinental Congress for Peace, Everybody's Committee to Outlaw War, and the Con- ference of Greater New York Peace Groups. ,Waldo Frank, one of the initiating sponsors of the Emergency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba, was the original chairman of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee and also a sponsor of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. He has been active in Communist fronts since the late twenties and early thirties when he was a contributor to the Com- munist magazines, New Masses and Soviet Russia Today, and also a backer of the Communist Party's candidates for President and Vice President of the United States. At one time, he served as special correspondent for the Communist Party's official newspaper, the Worker. In 1955 he was invited to Red China. The State Department denied him a passport and was upheld in this action by the Supreme Court, Frank has admitted to the Senate In- ternal Security Subcommittee that he was paid $25,000 by Castro's government to write a book about Cuba. Carleton Beals, another initiating sponsor of the Emergency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba, was cochairman of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee at the time of its formation. He has been ? active in Communist-front groups since the late twenties when. he was a contrib- uting editor for New Masses, Recently he has written for the blatantly pro- Communist newspaper, the National GuarAian, I mentioned 4efore that the display of naMes in the ad?the 80 cosponsors? was One impressive, _I s4oui4 also point out that a fesg of thon Persons have been identified as CoMinuntst Party No. 6-13 Approved For Release 2063/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE members and that a large number of them are well known to students of the Communist movement in the United States. They have, for years, been among the foremost fellow travelers in the country. Now, what are the facts about the need or desirability of any American contributing to this obviously Commu- ? nist-serving relief organization? In other words, what was the validity of the appeal? Was it an honest one or a fraud? Hurricane Flora struck eastern Cuba on October 4 and lashed large parts of the island for 4 days. It did tremendous damage to crops, cities and towns, and took hundreds of lives. Immediate offers of relief came from all over the world? from non-Communist nations as well as those under Red control. The United States did not hold back despite the fact that it had severed dip- lomatic relations with Cuba, the island is serving as an oversea center for So- viet subversion of all of Latin America and an advance Red military base for fu- ture use against this country. The American Red Cross and other welfare agencies, with the knowledge and con- sent of our Government, offered to send medical supplies, food, emergency equip- ment, and relief and disaster specialists to Cuba?just as they did to Haiti, To- bago, and other Caribbean areas dev- astated by Hurricane Flora. What happened? Castro's Communist regime accepted the relief offered by all Communist coun- tries and organizations and also the re- lief offered by non-Communist sources? except for the United States. The Amer- ican Red Cross offer, of assistance was turned down. Castro had decided that he would deny to his suffering people the benefit of the funds, equipment, and know-how of the American Red Cross which, over a period of many years, has chalked up an out- standing record of speedy, effective, and massive relief to victims of disasters in all parts of the world. Castro had a Com- munist card up his sleeve, and he was going to play it no matter how much it hurt the Cuban people. He was going to use the disaster as a vehicle for anti-U.S. propaganda in Cuba and throughout the world. He was going to use the disaster in an attempt to divide the American people from their Government. He was going to use it?and this was his primary objective?to break the U.S. economic blockade of Cuba and bring about a reversal of our Cuban policy. Worldwide, this is a major Communist objective today because the blockade has hurt not only the Communist regime in Cuba but all Communist nations. All are economically hard pressed, yet they must keep Cuba going?the Cuba whose economy was wrecked by the bungling, waste, and mismanagement of Castro's Red regime even before Hurricane Flora struck. Cuba is a drain on the inter- national Communist economy. The U.S. economic blockade intensifies the drain. Castro's first step, following his re- jection of U.S. aid, was an attempt to 399 justify his action in the eyes of the Cu- ban people, the American people, and the world. In typical Communist fash- ion, he claimed that his decision was based on his concern for world peace. On October 11, a Havana broadcast in English made the following statement: The Cuban representatives in the United Nations in rejecting the offer of help used harsh words not just for the sake of calling names, but in order to alert the world to the dangerous role that the U.S. Govern- ment is playing, for it is an admitted fact that the warmakers are trying to do exact- ly what the hurricane did. * * * Is it not hypocrisy and a fake gesture of generosity to offer help under such conditions? What is behind this deception? Is it not to blind the peace forces to the real nature of the warmaker's intentionsrto dress up the beast of imperialism and make it look like -a sweet kitten? In refusing to cooperate with a lie, Cuba may be passing up some food and clothing and medicines that might have come through the Red Cross, but it is also pre- venting the warmakers from putting over a bluff. In that sense Cuba's rejection of the hypocritical or demagogic offer is a sacri- fice that it is making in order to safeguard the peace of the world, and of course that is for the benefit of the people of the United States also. Another English language broadcast to the United States on October 14 quoted from an editorial in the Cuban Commu- nist newspaper Hoy of October 11, in ex- planation of why the U.S. offer had been rejected. This editorial claimed that the U.S. aid offer was "nothing more than a cheap way to confuse international public opinion about the policy of the United States toward Cuba" and a "trick to throw the world off guard, through which the imperialists hope to be able to carry out their war plan even more effectively." Castro wanted to do more, however, than simply brand the United States as a hypocritical, warmaking imperialist na- tion. He wanted to use as many Ameri- cans as he could against their Govern- ment. He wanted, if possible, to split American opinion on the question of U.S. Cuban policy. For this reason, the Oc- tober 11 broadcast, from which I have al- ready qucted, directed an appeal for as- sistance to the American people, as distinguished from the U.S. Government. The broadcast reviewed aid that had been given to foreign Communist causes in the past through Communist fronts operating in the United States. It men- tioned, as examples, the work of the North American Committee To Aid Spanish Democracy during the thirties and the World War II operations of Rus- sian War Relief. The broadcast stated: The common people in the United States have proved by their past action * * " that they will respond to calls for help just as generously as the people of Prance, Israel, the Soviet Union, or any other country, provided that an organization is present to help them channel their sentiments. The last part of that quotation is most significant and bears repetition: "Provided that an organization is present to help them channel their sentiments." Then the appeal for help was made to the American people. The Cuban broad- cast said: Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500680005-4 ? 4,00 ,,Let ua.renzember that, at the same time Cuba's Unitee Nations' Ambassador re- jected an offer of aid from the United States, also said; "However, we will accept any offer of help from the North American peo- pl S, from any U.S. citizen who wishes at this time to express solidarity with us in any way he sees fit." Those are the wards of an offi- cial spokesman of the Cuban Government. In another English language broadcast on October ,14, Havana radio stated that though Cuba had rejected American Red ClaaSS assistanee' The first thing to notibe is that the Cubans have not tiumed their backs on an offer of riOp from the people of the United States, but only on offIciel or semiofficial agencies Of theUS. qovOrnment. We cannot repeat this too often. ThiS k]r0114CEISt again quoted the words Used by the Cuban Ambassador to the United Nations in rejecting the U.S. of- fer of assistance: However, we will accept any offer of help from any U.S. citizen who wishes at this time to express his solidarity with us in any Way he sees fit. The Havana radio broadcasts did not fall on deaf ea -s. On October 18, a "1)ear Friend" letter was mailed from the post office box of Dr. Louis Miller in New York to persons who had been on the znailing list of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee when ft was function- ing. The letter told of the damage Hur- fleane Vlora, had done to Cuba. It an- nounced that the signers of the letter "are working to dispatch shipments of Medical and relief supplies directly through hospital institutions as we did 'With, medical aid before." It closed with an appeal for contributions and word that oheeks should be Made payable to Dr. lVfiller. The letter was signed by Zr. Miller, as former medical director of the Megical Aid to tuba Commitee; Sidney 3. luck, as the former treasurer ?of the arganizati on; and Basil Pollit, as its_former legal counsel. he Va14. Play" for Cuba Committee also acted., A few days later, Vincent 'Theodore e, the PPdCs national di- rector, mailed a letter in support of the Communist-proznoted relief for Cuba ? drive to giose_ on his group's mailing list. , Lee, by the way, appeared before the Coinraittee on _.1:n-American Activi- kms last year in the courie of its investi- gation of illegal travel 'to Cuba and in- voked the fifth amendment on present Communist Part,' membership. Here are a few excerpts from the two-page 'ap- Ileal that Was mailed from the Fair Play I ar Cuba headquarters in New York City over Lee's signature: Already an independent ad hoc committee of persons With various attitudes toward the Xfuloan revolution has been formed to con- duct such a [Cuban relief] program. It i E s called the merge icy Gonimittee for Disaster Relief to Cnba. It is the will and the desire of the Pair Play for Cuba Corimittee to use every one of our reSources to see that this committee slic- cessfvaly achieves its goal of raising the funds needed to buy medical supplies and ilood items Such as powdered milk for chil- dren in hungry- Cuba. * * -;We ask you to open yonr hearts and Bend check for this cause Immediately. * * * Please, this Is not for the Fair Play for Cuba Coinmittee, send all moneys for the Cuban Approved For Releas 2003/09/26: CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 CONG ESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE January 1J, rell1ef to the Entergency C'ommittee for Dis- ast r i lief to Cilba or Its treasurer. nal this new committee obtains an office of tts own we will accept checks at the na- tiollal office of rair Play but they should be made cut to the aforementioned organiza- tion for their use only. Mr. Speaker, the Fair Play for Cuba Comm .ttee has been the major pro- Castro front in the United States since its organization in the spring of 1960, a few months after the bearded dictator sated control of Cuba. Lee Harvey Os- wald, Excused assassin of President Ken- nedy, tias head of the New Orleans chap- ter of his group. The U.S. Communist Party, of course, dicl not remain idle. It did just what we would expect it to do. Within a few days it, too, had issued an official state- ment on the Cuban disaster. Havana Radio played up the statement in an October 23 broadcast. The full text of it Was published in the party's news- paper, the Worker, of October 27. The statement read in part as follows: Ike c ll upon the members and friends to be in toe forefront of this activity [the col- lection of relief for Cuba] and to spur their organizations for the collection of urgently neelded aid. It ended with these words: We call upon each and every Communist to look upon the mobilization for immediate dislister aid to Cuba as a sacred duty in the care cf common humanity as well as an act of solider* binding all those sharing a coin= a ideal. Sigr iflcantly, this official Communist Party statement pointed out that "a nu,mbe r of people's organizations are al- ready moving to collect funds, food, clothing, and urgently needed medi- cines.' l'People's organizations," in Commu- niat parlance, means Communist front or fellow traveling groups. The issue of the Worker which carried the full text of the above statement also featured an article about the formation of the Emergency Committee for Dis- aster Relief to Cuba--and noted that contributions were to be made payable tci Dr. Miller at his New York City post office box. No "Jommunist or fellow traveler who reads the Worker could fail to get the message. Havana radio summarized the Ctanntunist Party statement in these words: the communique also asks all members and Communist Party sympathizers to head movements of aid for Cuba. * * * The corn- milnique concludes by asking each North Amertfan Communist to consider an im- media a mobilization to help the people af- fected by the disaster * * as an act of solidai ity which is binding on all those who share ,t common ideal. the Communist Party fully understood the political move Castro was making in rejecting the American Red Cross offer of help. It knew that Communist front aid to Cuba was only a secondary aim and that breaking the blockade was the major one. The statement therefore nmde this point: Tod ty when the heroic people of Cuba, uider the leadership of Fremier Fidel Castro, a uidergoint such untold hardships, it Approved For Releas must become the immediate duty-41 every decent American to demand that the prim' nal blockade be lifted forthwith In order to allow the full st expression of solidarity and humanity 'Oy the people of our country to the people of Cuba. There must be renewed and concerted effort on the part of all peaceloving and demo- cratic-minded Americans to demand that the Kennedy administration put an end to the present Cuba policy and embark upon a new policy of peace and friendship and normal trade and diplomatic relations. This IS essential in the interests of our own peo- ple as well as Cuban people and for world peace. The Worker followed this up with an editorial in the issue of October 29 de- manding an end to the embargo and calling on its readers to write letters to the President and the State Depart- ment urging such action. Meanwhile what was the Emergency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba doing? By November 1, it had an office and printed stationery on which, under that date, it mailed out a second appeal for contributions. This letter was signed by Gluck as chairman of the new organi- zation, Elizateth Sutherland as treas- trer, and Dr. Miller as medical director, checks to be made payable to him. Various Communist groups in the United States which, despite their ideo- logical differences, have been united in their support of 'Castro, went to work on behalf of the Emergency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba. Favorable items about the formation of the group and its activities appeared not only in the Worker, its west coast counterpart, the People's World., and the National Guard- ian, but also in the Militant, official organ of the Trotskyists? and the Work- ers World, the publication of another Communist splinter group. The Communist Party's monthly mag- azine, New World Review, in its issue of December 1963, told its readers that they should support the Emergency Commit- tee for Disaster Relief to Cuba and called for an end to the "inhuman embargo whereby our Government seeks to stran- gle Socialist Cuba." The committee was also helping it- self. It had sufficient funds to place a half-page ad in the National Guardian of November '7 and to pay for a full-page, back cover ad in the November 30 issue of the Nation magazine. The Washing- ton Post ad of December 16, which cost approximately $800. was apparently the high point in its advertising campaign. I believe the facts make it incontest- ably clear that the Emergency Commit- tee for Disaster Relief to Cuba is a Com- munist agency?Commupist in its inspi- ration, Communist in its operation, Com- munist in its aims. Contrary to its claim in the Washing- ton Post ad, it is not carrying out "a humanitarian, nonpolitical mission." The ad was a fraud and a hoax. The committee is designed to exploit the suffering of the Cuban people in order to play on the generosity and gullibility of non-Communist Americans to aid Castro and Ithrushchev in their efforts to break the U.S. embargo on Cuba, to undermine this country's overall policy toward Cuba, to strengthen Castro, and thus to aid 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67B00446R000500080005-4 /964,Approved For Release 2191RigiliPainkgPAliffliMAROIRffitilk0005-4 ?CommUnist subversion throughout Latin America. Its purposes, to put it bluntly, are primarily anti-United States. Even as this committee and other Communist organizations throughout the world are pleading for funds to help the Cuban people, Castro is attempting to round up 500 Americans who will defy their Government by visiting Cuba this summer?with all expenses paid by his Red regime. This will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars?a sum which would pay for extensive relief for the Cuban people if Castro were at all interested in their welfare. But, no, Castro is not concerned with the welfare of his slaves. He wants only the expansion of Communist power. And, unfortunately, there are people in this country who are all too ready to help him?and there are newspapers which, for the money, will assist Communist op- erations of this type. Some people wonder about how Com- munist. fronts get started, how they func- tion, the disguises they use to conceal their true purposes?and what those pur- poses are. The facts about the Emer- gency Committee for Disaster Relief to Cuba go far toward answering all (mei- dons? of this type. This organization is one that no American loyal to his coun- try and the principles on which it Is founded would touch with a 10-foot pole. PRESIDENT JOHNSON AND THREAT TO CANAL ZONE (Mr. DORN asked and was given per- mission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.) Mr. DORM. Mr. speaker, President Lyndon Johnson issued the following statement this morning at 12:30 a.m. after a 21/2-hour conference on the Pan- natna crisis: The.Upitecl States tries to live by the policy of the good neighbor and expects others to do the same. The United States cannot allow the secur- ity of the Panama Canal to be imperiled. We have a recognized obligation to operate the Canal efficiently and securely, and we Intend to honor that obligation in the in- terest of all who depend on it. The United States continues to believe that when order is fully .restored, it should be possible to have direct and candid discus- sions between the two governments. I commend President Johnson for his strong and reassuring statement, Over the years the American people have been gravely concerned about Com- munist agitation, mob violence, and dis- order all aimed at American ownership of the Panama Canal. Communist agents, subversives, and saboteurs from Red Cuba, Russia, and China are con- stantly at work to undermine U.S. sov- ereignty over the Canal. I joined the distinguished and able gentleman from Pennsylvania [Mr. noon) and the distinguished and able gentleman from Alabama [Mr. BELDEN] and others in opposing the flying of the Panamanian flag over the Canal Zone beside the U.S. flag. We knew then that U.S. acquiescence to this demand would lead to further demands and eventually would lead to a demand that the United States withdraw front the Canal Zone entirely, placing the Canal under inter- national control or under Panamanian control. It is now imperative that we make no further concessions to Commu- nist inspired mob violence and the wild demands and ridiculous charges in Hav- ana, Peiping, and Moscow. Mr. Speaker, I again commend Presi- dent Johnson for assigning to the Pan- ama crisis the proper priority and for immediately realizing the grave threat to the security of the Canal Zone and thus the security of the United States and the Western World. CORRECTION OR VOTE Mr. BURKE. Mr. Speaker, on roll- call No. 228 I am recorded as not voting. / was present and voted "yea." I ask unanimous consent that the permanent RECORD and Journal be corrected ac- cordingly. The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Mas- sachusetts? There was no objection. CORRECTION OF VOTE Mr. MONTOYA. Mr. Speaker, pre- viously I made a request with respect to correcting what / thought should be roll- can No. 247. Actually, the request should have related to rollcall No. 248. On rollcall No. 248 I am recorded as not voting. I was present and voted "yea." I ask unanimous consent that the permanent RECORD and Journal be corrected accordingly. The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from New Mexico? There was no objection. THEIR PRESCRIPTION: INTEGRA- TION?U.S. NURSES ASKED FOR "QUIET, PLEASE" (Mrs. FRANCES P. BOLTON (at the request of Mr. THOMSON of Wis- consin) was given permission to extend her remarks at this point in the RECORD, and to include extraneous matter.) Mrs. FRANCES P. BOLTON, Mr. Speaker, as you know, my interest in nursing goes over many, many years, and I have been particularly interested in the very effective and quiet way in which the Negro nurses have been taken into the American Nurses Association. The Association for Colored Graduate Nurses was the first group to amalga- mate with another organization. This was due very largely to the consecrated work of Estelle Riddle and Mable Keaton Staupers. To my mind, there is no group in this country who make better nurses than our colored people. They seem to have an intuitive capacity for it. Now that it is possible for them to get the best training there is, they are able to project themselves into the work with their minds and their hands trained? their hearts already working for the best for the patient. The Washington Post on January 5, published a very interesting article about Mrs. Staupers and her work. I have taken the liberty to edit it a little 401 that It may not be too long, but I feel sure that all House Members will want to know what is in this interesting article: U.S. NURSES ASKED FOR "QUIET, PLEASE" (13y Louise Durbin) "Integration in the nursing profession? We did It quietly. The nursing leaders thought the quiet way was the best way." It was Mabel Keaton Staupers, former presi- dent of the National Association for Colored Graduate Nurses which merged with the American Nurses' Association, talking in her Washington home. Though she undertook it quietly, the sprightly, '73-year-old Mrs. Staupers thor- oughly accomplished her purpose and achieved equality for members of her pro- fession. Today, the State nurses' associations in every one of the 50 States are integrated? Georgia was the last to lower the barrier in 1962. The American Nursing Association itself is a smoothly operating and integrated organi- zation that has a full-time department de- voted to intergroup relations. More and more Negro nursing schools are closing their doors as qualified Negro stu- dents are attending integrated schools of nursing. All six District of Columbia schools of nursing?Capital City at D.C. General Hos- pital, Catholic University of America, Freed- men's Hospital, Georgetown University, Lucy Webb Hayes at Sibley Memorial Hos- pital, and Washington Hospital Center?ac- cept Negro nursing students. The number who enroll Is small?as reflected in the 5 Negro girls out of the total 181 students who are seeking to become R.N.'s at Capital City School of Nursing. Of 178 collegiate nursing programs throughout the country, 109 had accepted qualified Negro students by 1961. * * Today, several of these 12 colleges already have changed their policies and now admit Negro students. * ? ? Negro RN's are accepted as officers M all branches of the Armed rorces, More and more hospitals are employing Negro nurses as members of the staff in all departments that require R.N.'s. Of the hos- pitals in the District of Columbia, only Doc- tors Hospital has not employed Negro regis- tered nurses to date. Typical of area hospitals is George Wash- ington University Hospital, where 94 of the 174 full time R.N.'s employed on the staff and in administrative positions are Negroes. But in 1984, when the NAOMI opened its office in the same New York building with the other nursing organizations, things were tough, though the ANA had, since its begin- nings in 1890, offered membership to all qualified nurses. "You must remember that at the age and time we started, people definitely believed in segregation," said Mrs, Staupers. "Frequently I had to send a girl, who came to my office, back to prepare herself before she could even be accepted by a good school of nursing. The dual educational system in Southern States didn't provide adequate high school training. And of course we had to work to get the good nursing schools to accept Negro students. PEOPLE IN HIGH PLACES DID THE FRONT- RUNNING "How did we get nursing schools and hos- pitals to accept Negro students and R.N.'s? You can't do it all alone. The most impor- tant thing is that you have to get people in high places to understand the problems and do the front-running," explained the remark- able pioneer. "For years Catholic University didn't ac- cept Negroes though it was the only place in Washington where nurses could take grad- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 ittaktillsTOBRWARacrschige45-4 January 1.4 it has conducted to eliminate discrimination ATTORNEYS SOCIALIZE in nursing education and employmet. And the remarkable Mabel Staupers has (Mr. POFF (at the request of Mr. told her own story, of her tireless, unceasing THOMSON of Wisconsin) was given per- campaign in her book, "No 'Time for Preju- mission to extend his remarks at this dice," which was published by the Macmillan point in the REcORD, and to include ex- Co. in 1961, traneous matter.) 402pproved For Release 2003/010246 nate work. /n 1936 we appealed to the Cath- cilia Interracial Council and asked them to change the situation themselves. They did." Mrs. Staupers recalled another incident: "A Negro who had applied for admission to Yale Graduate School of Nursing was told she would be happier in a Negro school. "I wrote her and told her nursing at its best was a lot at hard work and the most important thing was to get the best qualifi- cations?you didn't go to nursing school to be happy. "Then we appealed to a member of the Yale board, Dr. ADS011 Phelps Stokes. He under-. stood the problem. In 1946 the first Negro nurse graduated from a Yale collegiate nurs- ing course. "One of the greatest champions we ever had is Representative PRANCES PAYNE BOLT TON, Republican, of Ohio. She spearheaded the opening of the Wesern RIDSOTH3 Univer- sity school of nursing?which is named for her?to Negro students in 1946." The Barbados-born and Harlem-bred Mrs. Staupers recalled other parts of the NACGN nursing history of her time. "Only tour of the some 200 hospitals in the New York metropolitan area employed Negro nurses in 1937?Lincoln, Harlem, Seaview, and Riverside. "And in the few hospitals in the North where Negro RN's were employed there were subtle ways to differentiate-1f a Negro nurse was given a supervisor's job, she wasn't given the title or pay that went with it." When Mabel Staupers went to bat for the NACCIN, she put her appeal for equal pay for Negro nurses to hospital boards strictly on an eConomic basis. "We pointed out that a Negro nurse had to pay just as much for her uniform and shoes RS a white nurse did," she explained. "We were trying to win our fight for the tuning profession and policies?to give the best patient care?not just for Negroes. The most precious friends the Negro nurses had, in both the North and South, were the white nurses who took up the fight with us?and for us," she continued. "When a person is ill, the average patient would never refuse a Negro nurse so long as he knows the hospital is responsible for the nurse's qualifications. Qualifications are all- important," she stressed. During World War U, a quota of Negro nurses were accepted in the Army?then relegated to serving prisoners of war or segregated Negro troops. The Navy refused to accept Negro nurses. Then, after endless redtape and talk with generals and admirals, Mrs. Stumm was received in November 1044, by Eleanor Roosevelt, who listened carefully and sympathetically to the-problems. By Janu- ary 1945, the Navy Nurse Corps announced it would accept nurses regardless of race, and, at the same time, discrimination in the Army was on the wane. The smooth blending of the NACC1N into the ANA took place 12 years ago, in 1961, without fanfare or fuss. An intergroup rela- tions department had been set up' within the ANA in 1946 so that by the time the NACGN disbanded in 1961, the ANA and Its predominantly white membership were well prepared for the merger. "We dissolved our corporation, and turned our well-being over to the ANA," Mrs. Staupera said simply. Ironically, it was the Negro girls who had to be prepared for integration when it came. "We went all over' the country urging the girls to Join State nurses' associations when they did open their doors to qualified Negro graduate nurses. We told them If they didn't join and participate, we couldn't help them, for we were working for nursing and policies, not just Negroes.' she explained. Today, the nursing profession, represented A41; ANA, is _proud of the continuing cam'ovegleFaoReieaseri0031.0.026 TIME FOR COOL HEADS (Mr. KEITH (at the request of Mr. TnomsoN of Wisconsin) was given per- mission to extend his remarks at this point in the REcoRD, and to include ex- traneous matter.) Mr. KEITH. Mr. Speaker, all of us are well aware that the situation con- fronting both the United States and Panama is ominous. Now as much as at any other time in the history of our rela- tions, all sensible, diplomatic means should be used to reach an agreement and understanding which will be mu- tually satisfactory to both the United States and Panama. Our long-term in- terests and those of Panama are iden- tical and demand the continued and efficient operation of the canal. In this connection, I would like to call an ex- traordinarily reasonable and farsighted editorial from the Standard Times of New Bedford of January 11, 1964, to the attention of my colleagues. [From the New Bedford (Mass.) Standard- Times, Jan. 11, 1964] TIME volt Coot HEADS It would be a terrible tragedy if hot- headed young Panamanian leftists, and American students who should know better, were allowed to provoke a permanent break between the United States and Panama. The situation in the Canal Zone is made to order for Fidel Castro. He is only too aware of the undercurrent of ilIwili against the United States in Panama and he fans the flame at every opportunity, hoping to force Washington to abandon the Canal Zone. The United States has no intention of get- ting out. It Is in the zone by mutual agree- ment between the two countries, pays sub- stantial wages to those who operate the canal, and needs the zone as a lifeline be- tween the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The United States has been regularly wanting new and more generous economic and political concessions to Panama. Last January, this country permitted Panama to claim titular sovereignty over the Canal Zone, and agreed that flags DORI both coun- tries would fly side by side over 16 designated locations. The agreement when into full effect Jan- uary 1, 1964, but American high school stu- dents broke it this week when they raised the American flag at a nonauthorized spot in front of Balboa High School despite an appeal from Robert J. Fleming, Jr., U.S. Governor of the zone. Young Panamanians, spurred on by Fidel- leas, then attacked the U.S. Embassy, de- stroyed American property and fired on U.S. troops who were forced to return the fire. The result: At least 20 dead, about 200 wounded and the most serious disagreement yet between Panama and the United States, Mr. POFF. Mr. Speaker, an item ap- peared in the December 20 issue of the Washington Star which may have escaped the attention of some lawmakers and in which, in my judgment, every law- maker and law practitioner should take an interest. I quote herewith the news article which is datelined Warsaw: Poland's 6,700 lawyers will be forced into collectives under a measure ending private legal practice in the Communist nation. The bill was passed last night by Poland's Communist-dominated Parliament with only five opposing votes. Although a client may still select his own attorney, fees will be set by the Government and paid to the lawyers' association. Part of the income will be di- vided equally among all members of the col- lective and part in proportion to the work they do. Sponsors of the bill argued that legal fees were too high for ordinary people. Mr. Speaker, many lawyers seem un- concerned about the fact that some peo- ple in America would like to see the medical profession socialized. Because they are not personally and immediately concerned, they have closed their eyes and ears to the threat. Lawyers would do well to come to the aid of their sister profession. Who can say that the next Proposal might not be "Legal Aid to the Aged," and next "Medical and Legal Aid for Everybody." MASSACHUS CITIZENS FOR PRAYER (Mr. BECKER (at the request of Mr. THomsoN of Wisconsin) was given per- mission to extend his remarks at this point in the RECORD, and to include ex- traneous matter.) Mr. BECICER. Mr. Speaker, I am in- serting herewith "A Challenge to Ameri- can Democracy," by the Massachusetts Citizens for Prayer in Public Schools. This is a bona fide organization of good solid American citizens and I am certain anyone reading this, will be able to de- cide for themselves just what it is Ameri- cans want, and that they do not intend that Almighty God and prayer, be barred from our society, public and otherwise This organization has been intrumental In calling discharge petition No. 3 to the attention of many of the Members of the House from Massachusetts as well as of other States. I commend this to your attention. THE PRAYER AMENDMENT: A CHALLENGE TO AMERICAN DEMOCRACY Once upon a time there was a country, a democracy, which had a congress of several Panamanian president Roberto Chiari has hundred Members. When the highest Court demanded a cOmplete investigation of the in that country banned prayer and Bible flareup by the Organization Of American reading from its public schools, nearly 160 States. The United States should have no Congressmen filed proposals to amend the objection to a fair and unbiased examination Constitution to return the longstanding of the situation, and has ordered a full-scale practice of such prayer and to forestall inquiry on its own, further judicial inroads into other cherished In the meantime, each side would gain instances of public reverence. This was a by a return to normal operations in the high percentage. At the same time many, Canal Zone. Anything less would permit though not all, of the religious leaders of Communist agitators to ply their trade and the country denounced the Court's action tretgaRDP07131161446R000500080005eg dangerous precedent Besides ENGLISH BUS DEAL WITH CASTRO ADDITIONAL SETBACK FOR U.S. _DIPLOMACY CHARGE66/AY: Eagpiii4agiziekki3F0KcjaA A FREE CUBA Approvea ror Kelease zuu.s/ aim (Mr. CRAMER (at the request of Mr. SHRIVER) was given permission to extend his remarks at this point in the . . . 1964 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE RECORD, and to include extraneous mat- ter.) Mr. CRAMER. Mr. Speaker, since last week 'when the Bilglish trade with the Communist Cuba bus deal CaMQ to pub- lic attention, I demanded the State De- partment t file a protest with the Brit- ish and I insisted upon an effective trade ban against Castro's Cuba. The Citizens' CoMmittee for a Free Cuba has since charged that this deal amounting to $12.2 million is the lat- est in a .series of setbacks in U.S. di- plomacy." The committee cites tie sale of Ca- nadian wheat to Russia, with a portion set aside for Cuba," the increasing num- ber of spare parts reaching Cuba for in- dustrial plants and- this bus deal as showing the "porousness" of U.S. poli- cy. I enclose in the RECORD the full text of the Cftiaens' Committee for a Free Cuba press release of January 10, 1964, which gWes a full review of the bus deal, points Out the further implications of the bus deal in that Cubars transport system was bogged -crown as the -result Of effectiVe sabotage on the part of the Cu- ban people and "the Leyland bus deal goes far in getting him?Castro?off a very serious hook with his own rebel- lious subjects." The committee joins in a call I have been making, for some time for "greater determination" on the part of the Unit- ed States in our policy of "isolation" of Cuba. . ENGLISH Bus SALE UNDERMINES CUBAN RESISTANCE The current sale of 450 Leyland buses by England to Castro, with adequate supplies of spare parts included, is the latest in a series of setbacks in U.S. 'diplomacy; The deal amounts to 912.2 million. The sale of Canadian wheat to Russia, with a portion set aside for Cuba, and the in- creasing numbers of spare parts reaching Cuba through various unauthorized c.han- neIs for Castro's desperate industrial plant, underscores the porousness of U.S. policy. Perhaps the most important effect which this porousneas has had, and will continue to have unless something drastic is done, will be on the determination of the Cuban people to continue their resistance to Castro's Commu- nist regime. Perhaps inadvertently, possibly deliberate- ly, the determination of the United States and the free World to maintain and strength- en its economic blockade has been matched by an equal determination of the Cuban peo- ple to sabotage the regime Out of business. Breakthrough now by Castro in essential transport, represented by the purchase of buses, cannot but have a weakening effect on the future resistance of the Cuban people. It may presage future deals by our own al- lies, triggered,- some lawmakers maintain, by our own Government-sponsored sale of grain to Russia .and Iron Curtain countries. Our policymakers who hope and expect the Cuban people to continue their resistance, and Cas- tro effectively undermined, can only see their policy smashed by spare parts, wheat, and other grain deals. If, over the past several years, our Govern- ment had told the story of Cuban resistance to our press and made it a point of policy to relate this resistance to its economic embar- go, perhaps the stake of all, including our allies, would be more readily understood. In- stead, the embargo has been handled as a part of impersonal economic relationships between nations without regard to human Values to which it should have been related. Here is a partial history of the partially effective U.& economic blockade on Castro's transportation, the contributions which have been made by the Cuban people themselves: In 1958 there were 303 urban, interurban, municipal, and provincial bus companies in Cuba which operated 4,459 passenger buses. Many of these companies were run as highly efficient and democratic cooperatives. A large percentage of bus drivers owned their own air-conditioned, modern U.S.-built buses, with automatic transmissions, and Cuba had bus service unequalled anywhere in the Caribbean or Latin America. Castro and the Communists seized the bus lines arid incorporated them into state-run enterprises. In defense of their rights, former owner-drivers who were then im- pressed into working for the state, set about sabotaging the Government lines. They per- mitted people to ride free; they "managed" to miss bus stops; drove into groups of Com- munist demonstrators; and in many cases actually burned their vehicles. Their ex- ploits were documented from 1961 on?in daily accounts in RevoluciOn and Hoy of ar- rests and confinement. Of some 3,000 anti- Castroites rounded up and jailed in a tunnel in Principe Prison on April 17, 1961, the fate- ful day of the landing at the Bay of Pigs, 258 were bus drivers, another 183 were con- ductors., and still another 102 were taxi drivers. In February of 1963, Minister of Transport, Omar Fernandez, publicly de- nounced Cuba's bus drivers as "the most counterrevolutionary element in our coun- try." The combination of shortage of parts and sabotage reduced the number of buses op- erating in Havana from 1,400 in 1958 to fewer than 800 in 1963. These figures were sup- plied by Hoy itself on March 27, 1963. Of the 800 left in service, the bulk of them were of Czech make, with manual transmissions, no air conditioning, and no safety glass or stor- age facilities for baggage. Ill adapted to Cuba's terrain and weather, the Czech buses constantly broke dawn and were easy targets for the sabotage visited upon them by their drivers, maintenance men, and conductors. Passengers slashed the seats and broke the doors. The breakdown in transport also made it difficult for factory and office managers to determine virelither absenteeism which was plaguing the regime was deliberate or was due to the breakdown in public transporta- tion, as the confusion in industry mounted. The regime desperately tried to overcome the critical situation by impressing domestic servants into learning to drive confiscated private automobiles and assigning them to routes as "popular transport." This merely increased the traffic hazards. By the time of the sale of BritiSh Leyland buses, the Castro regime was reduced to using Soviet military trucks, equipped with makeshift benches and a small ladder extending down from the tailgate. Last May, Omar Fernandez excoriated Cuba's taxi drivers who, like their colleague bus driver-owners, had been deprived of their autonomy and virtually of a livelihood. Speaking at the National Congress of Taxi Drivers, he charged that their ranks are "filled with negative elements, bums, and de- linquents." He threatened that those "who do not stop to pick up passengers will be severely punished." Describing their atti- tude as "one of anarchy," Fernandez called for tighter controls. Just prior to his out- burst, in March of 1963, nine cab drivers were put on trial for "displaying an unco- operative attitude and a failure to maintain revolutionary vigilance during the night hours." The implication was that they either were working against the regime as members of the resistance or had refused to become informers for the Comr4Unists. In an editorial last May 18, Hoy accused bus drivers of "running their buses onto the curbs without regard for their tires." 297 Last August 27, the Department of Public Order (the secret police) Issued an order which set up "popular tribunals to judge those workers in the field of public trans- portation for their infractions." Those found guilty were sent to the concentration camp of Guanahacabibes in Pinar del Rio Province. "Popular tribunals" also were em- powered to determine, among the public transport drivers, those who "drove crazily and without regard for the equipment." A militiaman was assigned to each eight drivers to "watch their attitudes." In September, Cuban workers were required to fill out forms indicating the types of transportation used, the names of the drivers, and "observations." Cuba's railways?also administered by the Ministry of Transport?have been struck as well by sabotage. From December 28 of 1962 through the middle of February of 1963, Cuban saboteurs caused three major train wrecks. They occurred In Las Villas, Matan- zas, and Pinar del Rio Provinces. Workers at sugar mills did their share, as well. In checking the falling sugar produc- tion INRA headquarters "noted" the extraor- dinary number of accidents, with locomo- tives. Sugar Central Josefita in Havana province radioed that it had only one loco- motive in operation. "The other," said the radio operator, "had been derailed." /NRA headquarters asked for a full explanation and dispatched an inspector to the mill to investigate, stating that "there is not an extra locomotive in all of Cuba." In a 3-week period from the end of Febru- ary to the middle of March, a rash of reports sent to LNRA in Havana told of locomotives being derailed at sugar mills. Sugar Central Mercedes in Matanzas Province reported on February 27 that "a train had been derailed while transporting cane to the mill." On March 9, the Cuban Government re- vealed that another train wreck had taken place near Ciego de Avila, Camagtiey prov- ince. The engineer of one of the trains and several others were killed in the crash. The Government announced that the balance of the train crews "have been detained by agents of public order." In February, the radio operator of the provincial delegation of sugar mills foi Camagiley radioed Havana that "the people most against us are those at the sugar mill of San Francisco." On March 20, the head of the sugar mills for the province stated that "anti-Government groups spread the rails of the lines at the sugar mill of San Francisco, causing the derailment of two trains." The inability of Omar Fernandez to stem the tide of sabotage led, just last month, to his being ousted and replaced by Faure Cho- mon. Yet, last Wednesday, January 8, Ha- vana's Radio Progreso revealed that train wrecks were still continuing, and were the result of sabotage: "An important meeting was held at the Cuban-Spanish (Communist) Friendship So- ciety by the railway workers where agree- ments of the National Railway Council were approved. 'With respect to the train wrecks, it was agreed to ask the State Railway Enterprise and the Ministry of Transport to punish those responsible. [They] should be pun- ished uniformly and inflexibly with a 1- year's suspension of work without pay or enjoyment of any benefits of labor legisla- tion. After the year of suspension, they should spend another year earning a lower salary at lower position than before. In the case of being implicated in a train wreck, those responsible should be taken before the State Railway Enterprise, the labor union, and before the courts." The announcement also admitted to the disappearance of essential property: "To combat theft, the State Railway Enterprise and the union will both support action against the thief, including his final and Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 CONGRE c inplete punishment ad indictment before t e courts." The calumny heaped upon bus and taxi ivers extended to porters: "It was also a eed to suspend and punish those porters w o refuse to load baggage." An effort to do away with taxi drivers was c.ntatiied in the resolution to "study the ad- v sabiltty of using the 'popular transport' to d lye passengers and so put an end to the a uses of some taxi drivers and auto own- It it clear that the Castro regime itself ^ lates the breakdown of Cuba's transport s stein to effective sabotage on the part of t e Cuban people. The Leyland bus deal goes far in getting him off a very serious h..k with his own rebellious subjects. If or our allies sell Castro planes for his rlines, trains for "interprovincial travel," a d taxis to be driven by militants of the C nununist Party, whtch he said he was d terreined to purchase abroad, our policy o "isolation" will have been turned into a ajor disaster. Our Cuba policy, which has b-en under bipartisan fire, will have col- ,psed entirely. From all indications it .uld appear that this growing trend must It.t only be stopped, but rolled back with a eater determination than has yet been splayed. KENTUCKY'S RETURN TO THE MAJOR LEAGUES (Mr. CHELF (at the request of Mr. oGEF.s of Colorado) was given permis- s on to extend his remarks at this point the REcoan, and to include extraneous atter.) Mr. CHEL.P. Mr. Speaker, for the St time in over 60 years Kentuckians ye an opportunity to secure a major 1 ague baseball club. The city of Louis- v lie has always been a splendid baseball wit She was a.member of the National ague as far back as 1876, and had a f anchise with them from 1892 to 1899, a tine when Louisville's present base- 11 critics were unborn, unknown, and -diapered. Ever since I was E4 small child I can ^ all the accomplishments of our Louis- lie "Colonels." It hasn't been but a few ars ago when it beeame apparent that r minor league Louisville team had run to financial difficulty and it was most eartwarming, refreshing and stimulat- g to witness the eager and voluntary s pport of Kentuckians as they rallied ound the Louisville ball club by pur- e awing enough stock to bail the team t. If Kentuckians would do this for a riple A" club I submit that they would verwhelmingly support Charles 0. Fin- 1 y's major league team. Yea, Mr. Speaker, I was just a kid in t e old Louisville Masonic Widows and rphans Home wl,en I first heard rownup's" talk about traveling to S eh cities as Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Ws, and others in order to see a major gue ball game. Mr. Speaker, this ractice has been .standard operating rocedure in Kentucky far too long. We eserve a major league ball club. We an, and I sincerely believe, we will be ble to support it. Our State, county, and city officials ave joined with all of us who have the onor to represent our Commonwealth the Nation's Capitol?irrespective of arty affiliation?in order to make this ransition of the Atiletics possible. Not SIONAL RECORD ? HOUSE only i Kentucky's officialdom united; but what's. more important, the vast majority cf Kentucky's over 3 million people are likewise behind this move. Mr. Speaker, no more than I had learnecl that our energetic Mayor Wil- liam Ceavgar of Louisville and our fine young , KBntucky Governor, "Ned" Breathitt, had caused to be signed a con- tract with that courageous Charles 0. Finley,, sol3 owner of the Athletics, in which the 3tate of Kentucky had agreed to spend over a half-million dollars in- creasing tie seating capacity in the sta- dium Of the Kentucky State Fair- grounds from 20,000 to over 30,000 and had agreed on terms for the 1964-65 sea- sons, *an I heard that the other base- ball ch1bs .n the American League were opposed to this very legitimate contract that had been entered into by and be- tween !the sovereign State of Kentucky and the complete owner of a very legiti- mate business enterprise. Mr. Speaker, this situation brings rise to the veil practical question as to just who owns the Kansas City Athletics fran- chise?the man who put his money on the line at the time he purchased it or these self-appointed and self-anointed repre- sentatives of the various clubs of the Ame,ridan eague? Mr. Sps taker, when these interested parties possessing possibly several shares of stock in an incorporated club?these "glass docr fronts"?not a sole owner of a ball club?such as Finley?take on their hblie athan-thou, go-thither look? their Chess-cat grin, their affidavit ex- pressions, and their funeral mannerisms of "gloom doom, and tomb," we had better look out because, in my opinion, bad tremble lies ahead for every legiti- mate busir ess in America. If these base- ball clubs are allowed to dominate, con- trol, pressure, and even intimidate a fel- low alb cwner, a horrible precedent is being established contrary to the Con- stitution and the laws of our land. This is, as I see it, legalized blackmail in that it absolutaly forces one?against ones will to do tv not to do?or to perform or not to perform an act that may be preju- diced or datrimental to one's self or best interests. Mr. Spe aker, in a letter written to me by the Honorable Ford Frick, baseball's commiSsioner, dated May 21, 1958, he stated that he was opposed to the then Celler *bill. H.R. 10378, on the grounds that: It wotuld threaten baseball and other sports with eficilees litigation of every sports rule and agieerr ent. He went on to say that: AlthOugh baseball is opposed to the Celle,: bill it 4 str mgly in favor of legislation which will give fair treatment to all four organized team sgort by declaring a clean-cut exemp- tion of the s sports practices from the anti- trust laws. So, Mr. Speaker, baseball knows when It has r ge,od thing, and I do not believe that si e will make a move that will jeop- ardize hex rather unique and cloistered position. Mr. Speaker, if the time ever comes? God fcrbiet?in America that a bona fide, absolute, sole owner of any type or form of busnesa cannot sell, transfer, convey, January 13 loan, hypothecate or in any other manner trade, barter or even give his interests away without a group threatening or coercing him, that is the day that there should be introduced before my com- mittee, the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives, appropriate and remedial legislation, not only to in- sure justice with respect toward property rights but an accompanying resolution that would seek to inquire into this whole blasted mess of baseball. If major league baseball is to enjoy its present immunity, its status of isolation- ism, its inner sanctum, its holy of holies of preferential treatment; if baseball seeks to continue to be over, above and away from the worry pangs of antimo- nopoly and its legal application, then her leaders, such as Mr. Joe Cronin, presi- dent of the American League, and the Honorable Ford Frick, baseball high commissioner, should wake up, come down off of their cloud No. 14, get their feet on the ground, take a good, long breath of fresh air, get in the amen cor- ner, adopt a new kind of baseball reli- gion, acquire a new code of baseball rules and ethics or they are headed for a fall like mother's bread when her oven door slams. Mr. Speaker, when it became known that Finley had signed a contract with Kentucky to transfer his ball club there? listen to this written order by Mr. Joe Cronin, American. League president, to Charles 0. Finley. Among other things, he said: I therefore, as president of the American League, direct you to refrain from any further arrangements and await the deter- mination of the American League concerning the matter. This is a form of a threat. Mr. Speaker, boiled down to simple, plain, unadulterated, foothills of Ken- tucky language, this is not a fight between the cities of Kansas City and Louisville. It is far more fundamental and basic than that. I agree with Shirley Povich, that great sportswriter for the Washington Post, when he said: Will a club owner be ousted from the league for the first time in history if he chal- lenges the league's right to make him con- form? And how would they make him con- form? Naturally by pressure and other illegal means. Mr. Speaker, I can understand why an individual might be blackballed from his acceptance into a lodge, but I must con- fess that I am at a loss to understand why a group of men representing other Ameri- can League clulas are permitted to threaten, intimidate or in any other man- ner, push, shove or force a bona fide, sole club owner, literally out of business when it is known that such action will produce hardship, financial loss, and even the destruction of his very own "civil rights." If we are to have a civil rights bill, maybe baseball ownership rights ought to be made a part of that list. PAUL ROBESON RETURNS FROM SELF-EXILE (Mr. WAGGONNER (at the request of Mr. ROGERS of Colorado) was given per- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 1964 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD? HOUSE self from the garage and basement below and does not mean, as the word might imply, that the Center will be an empty shell. But even though the Center will be com- plete with seats and lights and chandeliers and drinking ? foUntains, it will still, in a sense, bean empty shell until it comes alive as a showplace Of American culture. This perhaps, will be the Trustees' most difficult task--one that has probably been complicated at least a little by the large Fed- eral contribution that has now been prom- Wed. Although it is planned that the Center Will be self-supporting and that there will be no need for annual Federal appropriations, it Would be naive not to assume that at least some Members of Congress would take lively interest in what goes on at the Kennedy Center. 'PRESSURE FEARED , . Representative LINDSAY, Republican, of New York, raised this question briefly during House debate on the bill last week and asked ' if the Center would not be subject to the same pressures as the cultural exchange pro- 'gram. Representative SCHWENGEL, Republican, of Iowa, said he looked forward to hearing the =mid of Meredith Willson played at the Center. Certainly, no member of the Cen- ter's Trustees can look forward to explaining to any Member of Congress why he can't hear the music he likes or see the drama of his State at the Kenendy Center. As the Nation's first living Memorial to a President, the Kennedy Center undoubt- edly will arouse questions of what is ap- propriate in a Presidential memorial. The Bolshoi Ballet might well perform at a na- tional cultural center, but someone is sure to ask if Russian Communists should perform in a center erected to the memory of an as- sassinated President. Tomorrow the Center's Trustees will hold their annual organizational meeting at 2 p.m. at 1701 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., fol- lowed by a meeting with the Center's Ad- visory Board at the State Department. Mr. Stevens said he expected the meetings to be routine, but it was apparent that he and his colleagues had already begun to grap- ple with the problems that lie in the next 21/2 years of construction and- yond., ' The United Kingdom our closest ally, is betting not only the Castro will still be run- ning Cuba 5 years from now but that the country will be fiscally sound with a Surplus to pay off debts. It is hard to imagine a more devastating critique of our policy In relation to COM- raunist subversion next door. The blow is compounded by the fact that West Germany, France, Japan, and Spain competed with Britain for the privilege of bailing Castro out of his transportation morass. Our policy of toppling Cuban communism by economic containment is sunk without a trace. Willingness of the British to deal with the enemy of all democratic governments in the Americas?and tossing it off as routine? should not be too surprising. England, as Ed Lahey put it in the Herald yesterday, has been known to rise above principle when a quick dollar was to be earned. We must admit also that our containment tactic was never firm and sure handed. It was full of leaks. We never really cracked down, as we said we would, on Allied ships bearing goods to Castro. If the economic blockade ever served a purpose, it is ineffective now. Castro has proven he can get what he wants from free nations while the Soviet Union pumps in arms. So what now? There are signs that President Johnson is moving to reassess the Cuban situation and strengthen the team to deal with it. The OAS has matters pending that could lead to an inter-American blockade, one that could be made to stick. The restless exiles might be unleashed to help fight for their country's redemption. The vast internal unrest in Cuba could be exploited rather than damped down. The British, in their business-as-usual ardor, may have done the free Americans a service by making the situation and the need for action clear. As we said long ago when the strengh of the Communist thrust became apparent, halfway measures will not do the job that inevitably must be done to return Cuba to the Cuban people. We might as well get to it. Mr. Speaker, the proper reemphasis a the problems caused by Cuba is fur- ther seen in an editorial in the Thursday, January 9, edition of the Chicago Trib- une, emphasizing the same problem of nations trading and maintaining the economy of Castro's Cuba. The inability to isolate and crush the Castro economy is dramatized by the Johnson administration's insistence to subLidize and aid the economy of the Soviet Union and other Communist coun- tries. The self-defeating purpose of this foreign policy is clearer than ever. WHO'S ISOLATING WHOM? Fidel Castro has once again thumbed his nose at our economic blockade, this time with help from Britain. He has arranged to buy at least 400 British buses to replace American buses which have been disabled by the lack of spare parts. These buses will help Castro restore Havana's crippled transportation sys- tem and thus mollify one of the more per- sistent of his people's many complaints. This is the latest of a number of deals Castro has made with our allies which are thwarting our policy of trying to isolate Castro and thus bring about his downfall. Yet the State Department's only comment is that It is "unhappy." There is no ground for formal complaint, because Britain has never agreed to help us isolate Castro. In response to our many pleas COMMUNIST DOMINATIO "AMERICAN ROADBLOCK" (Mr. DERWINSKI (at the request of Mr. SHarvint) was granted permission to ektend his remarks at this point in the RECORD and to include extraneous mat- ter,) Mr. DERVVINSKI. Mr. Speaker, the fanfare of the New Year and the Presi- den't state of the Union message have not brushed away the cold facts of life? that our foreign policy throughout the world, and especially in Latin America continues to deteriorate. We are somewhat diverted at the present time by the crisis in Panama but we must reali7e that the Communist domination of Cuba is the basic road- block to peace and advancement in Latin America. The Miami Herald, in a very kindly editorial, discusses our Cuban foreign policy, which as I have emphasized, is at the root of our complications. OUR CUBAN POLICY GOES UNDER Angry as we May be over Britain's deal to sell Fidel Castro buses under favorable long- term credits, the development has some so- bering implications for our decisionmakers in Washington. 273 for help, Britain has merely promised to exert "vigilance" in preventing further kidnapings by Castro in the West Indies. Our other allies have been likewise un- moved. Canada listened politely to our re- quest for cooperation, and responded by sell- ing a large supply of wheat to Castro. Spain expressed doubt that our blockade would be effective, and then proceeded to confirm its own doubts by buying $80 million worth of Cuban sugar in exchange for Spanish ma- chinery and fruit. The French Government replied sanctimoniously that what French exporters arranged with Cuba was none of its business. Foreign trade with Cuba has, in fact, pro- vided employment for the nearly 200 foreign ships?most of them British, Greek, or Leb- anese?which have been caught trafficking with Cuba and have been banned, under the decree of President Kennedy, from carrying cargoes financed by the U.S. Government. Thus the uselessness of our present pol- icy has been compounded. We have added to the inconsistency of our position by agreeing to sell American wheat to Russia and thus conceding, in effect, that there is no point in penalizing American farmers and exporters by restrictions which nobody else recognizes. We don't know how Castro is going to pay for the British buses, but there is little the State Department could say even if it should turn out that Britain is giving him credit. After all, the administration has insisted that we give credit to Russia for the purchase of wheat. There is no rhyme or reason in a policy which must necessarily depend on the co- operation Of allies whom we obviously can't control. If we cannot isolate Cuba ourselves, there is no point in trying. Let us hope that the light of reason will dawn upon the White House and the State Department, and an immediate reversal of our tragic foreign policy will be promulgated. PROPOSED LEGISLATION TO COR- RECT INEQUITIES IN OUR MONE- TARY AND FISCAL POLICIES The SPEAKER. Under previous order of the House, the gentleman from Texas [Mr. PATMAN] is recognized for 60 min- utes. (Mr. PATMAN asked and was given permission to revise and extend his re- marks and to include extraneous mat- ter.) Mr. PATMAN. Mr. Speaker, there is nothing more important in the business of legislation than to make certain that inequities in our monetary and fiscal policies be eliminated. Special favors for the fortuitous few?for the financially powerful?at the expense of the many, make for trouble whether in Latin America or in the 'United States of America. I wish to call to the attention of the Congress an iniquitous absurdity in re- gard to the special treatment we afford a large section of our banking institu- tions. We are indebted to the Domestic Finance Subcommittee of the Banking and Currency Committee for compiling and releasing for your consideration and that of the general public a volume en- titled "Banks Holding Treasury Tax and Loan Account Balances as of October 15, 1963." Upon request, Members of Con- gress or their constituents through their Congressman may receive this report. It Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP671300446R000500080005-4 CONGR]fSS:[ONAL RECORD ? HOUSE ntains a list prepared at my request by Federal Reserve of the private com- ercial banks-11,71)0 of them?which re this very minute receiving a subsidy t? in my opinion ;Ives the lie to the d saw that you cant get something for othi ag. The banking system of the United tates of America at this time is strong d powerful. Banks from one end of e country to the other are highly *Wit able. They can afford to pay their ay. Any subsidy to them is wasteful. subsidy to them is paid for by the erican taxpayer. It is indeed ironic that one gentleman I know who has gone around the country d rying subsidies is the president of a nk in Wilmington, Del., which re- Ives in effect a Government subsidy at least $400,001) annually. This oney accrues to the bank since it had o de:posit as of October 15, 1963, more t an 88 million of Federal money, a fig- that was exceeded during most of the ar. As a matter of fact, in early ?o- ber the bank had over $17 million of demi money on e:eposit. His bank ys Uncle Sam not 1 cent for this ney, but it is loaned out to the citi- ns of Wilmington and the State of D 'law are at the going interest rate for c ramercia,1 banks. You know that I an. talking about Ed N ilan, president of the Bank of Dela- w re. He is in the tradition of the old s 0 who was lecturing on the virtues o honesty with the stolen goose up his eve. His great crusade against you, Representatives of the people? a ainit several hundred local chambers of commerce, paxt of a national organi- ze, ion hepurports to head; against busi- n amen in general; against any pro- gr ive Measures for the betterment of o country, such at ARA; and yes, ag nst subsidies?alas, this crusade is j t as phony as I sale it was before you ge tlernen some time ago. And how do I now? Has Ed Neilan cried out against th subsidy to his bank, accruing from th more than $8 million of Uncle Sam's m ney on deposit for which he pays not 1 enry of interest? Has Ed Neilan co e to the support of the extremely as ute and capable Joseph Campbell, C ptroller General of the United St Vas .who, according to the Wall Street Jo al on December 31, 1963, urged th t bunks be charged for the use of F eral deposits? The General Account- in Office, a Federal "watchdog" agency, su gests that Congress require large ba ks to pay for the use of Government f ds kept on deposit with them. here, oh where, has the scrooge of WI rnington been in fa ling to decry the gr t giveaway to American banks in the fo of billions of Federal funds on de- post free for nothing? Mr. Neilan wants no ederal subsidies going to depressed are for projects that will put men back to or. No, he says area redevelopment is b d for the country, it is destructive of pri ate initiative, it just saps the soul of free nation. But a subsidy to the Bark of Delaware that eosts not a Penny to Ed Nellan nor to his iirectors, includ- ing a few Dupont stooges, he says that Is a it should be. Acco.rding to Mr. Nei- Ian, the bank renders services Which would cogt the Government a lot of money, and today the bank does this out of the goodness of its heart. Incident ally, I do not want the Bank of Delaware or any other bank rendering any service to the Government of the United, States without being adequately paid for that service. Most emphatically I favor a .;ervice charge for any service rendered to the Government by the banks. Iv 'ant to see a fair ratio between a reasenable profit made by banks on Government deposits and actual work done fer tie Government by the banks. I do not vet ,nt a bankers' bonanza as now exists. But how to return to the subcommit- tee report I mentioned a moment ago regarding banks holding Treasury tax and loan a3count balances. What do we mean by a tax and loan account? This is simp,1y U.S. Government money that sits in private commercial banks. The banks ar/L interest on it but not the Treasury o:' the United States. The total amount of such money in private banks as of mid-October was $4,040 million. Now hew did it get there? Several ways. Fir3t, when a bank buys Gov- ernment ecurities, whether for its customers or its own account, the Treas- ury may permit the bank to pay for the securities without turning the money into the Treasury or the Federal Reserve. Instead; th e bank opens an account in the name of the U.S. Treasury and puts the motley into that. In this manner the bank gets to keep the money which is earmarked for the Government, and waits for tre Treasury to call it into the Federal Re erve. In the meantime, the bank gets interest on the securities which it d d not pay for, but got by creating the deposit that bears no inter- est. These same securities could have been sold to the Federal Reserve and it would not lave cost the people interest. A second source of funds in the tax and loan account is income taxpay- ments?not the big, single payment you make at the end of the year that goes straight into the Treasury--but with- holding income taxes from payrolls and large quarte rly payments made by cor- porations. This gives rise to probably the most luc icrous situation in the whole relation4aip between banks and the Treasury. :Iere the Treasury deposits tax colleetio IS in commercial banks and the Governnent receives nothing for them. This same money can be used by the banks to purchase Government secu- rities on which the Treasury pays inter- est. 1)V10 benefits from this nonsensical situation? Only the commercial banks. Who pays the bill? The poor taxpayer. Other scan ces of tax and loan account funds inelude railroad retirement taxes, payroll Wee from the old age insurance program, aril certain excise taxes. All of this money is available for the unre- stricted use of the banks until it is later called into tae Federal Reserve system. It all earns interest, but not a penny of interest goes back to the Government. The Federal money on deposit is not a convenience to the Treasury. The Treas- ury does not, draw cheeks on it. The Treasury, I repeat, cannot use it until January .13 it is called into the Federal Reserve banks. Whenever the Treasury balance of working cash, which is kept in the Fed- eral Reserve banks, gets too low, then they call in tax and loan money, but since it is always coming into the banks as fast as it is goi:ng out to the Treasury, even faster, the banks know that they have a juicy subs:dy in the form of free money from Uncle Sam. That is, depos- its which cost them nothing, but which can be loaned to the public. During the fiscal year 1963, there was never any less than $2 billion sitting there. Sometimes, on the other hand, there has been over $10 billion, and the average for fiscal year 1963 was $5.3 bil- lion. The interest for 1 year an $5.3 bil- lion at 5 percent is $267 million. Do I hear Mr. Ed Neilan screaming about the $267 million annual subsidy to himself and his friends? Will someone who listens to his next "never-never" speech on the wickedness of subsidies be good enough to ask him why he has not been opposed to the big bankers bonus? Now there are 13,500 commercial banks in America, end 11,700 of these are official depositaries for tax and loan account funds. The average amount of Government money on deposit with each bank is something over $345,000, and the average annual interest on this amount at 5 percent is about $23,000. Some banks have much more than the aver- age. The Bank of Delaware holds over $8 million in Federal money, which is 23 times the average, and the more than $400,000 a year interest this bank earns on this money is 23 times the average. Eight banks in New York City?Chase Manhattan, First National City, Chemi- cal Bank, Morgan Bank, Manufacturers Hanover, Bankers Trust, Irving Trust, and Marine Midland?have over $800 million combined, or more than 20 per- cent. That is, 8 banks out of 11,700 that have one-fifth of all the money in the tax and loan account. In the main, I have discussed but one key subsidy that the Government pre- sents commercial banks. There are sev- eral ,others besides the tax and loan account. Now let us consider for a moment an- other special treatment afforded our commercial banks. It is a simple fact that banks are not permitted to pay in- terest on demand deposits. Now every- body else pays interest on their deposits, savings and loan, and even insurance companies, but not the commercial banks. These demand deposits are raw materials, just like pig iron, that rep- resent $150 billion on which banks are earning interest which they are not pay- ing to the depositors. Checking ac- counts are demand deposits. It is lawful for a bank to lend money to the holder of a checking account and, of course, charge him interest. But the banker would be violating the law if he were to pay interest on this checking account money which he in turn loans out, Some time or other this inequitable arrange- ment will be changed. Then there are many free services pro- vided to private banks by the Federal Reserve at an annual cost to the Ameri- Approved For Release 2003/09/26 : CIA-RDP67600446R000500080005-4 964 APproVed For ReleaSe_20049/26 ICWIlic367_BODIfili000500080005-4 ?-?} 261 1' CON6RtSSI AI, sEN- cmr),%t AgOJOURNMENT UNTIL - Mr. HIIMPIIREY. ' Mr. President, I a* unai'llitis oblisett that when the Senate cOricltdes its -business today, it stapd in adjournm.erit until 12 o'clock , noon on TueSaay nod. The Pht SIDING OFFICER. With- oUt objection, it is so Ordered. .., i. DECENTRAIZATI46N br . - POLTCY . Mr, mortsE. Mr. ?resident, I 'rise courteously 'and respectfully to express s?ne differences Of opinion which I have th the Senator from Arizona [Mr. GoLinvAixit] Ovef Certain foreign policy issues .abOtif which he has expressed views in recent days. - - I have Se* a coPY of-my remarks to the Senator from Arizona, and I have had a brief' and pleasant visit with him, telling him that I *ciuld be happy to have him caw to the floor of the Senate he cared to : do: go. He Very good- natUrediy told nie that it would not be necesSary , to do that, and that if he deemed it necessary, in due course he WOUld express himself on the floor of the Senate: He told me that he was about to leave his office to make a dona- tion of blood. I aSsilred him that I was not going to deplete him of his blood autiply and that II was -Merely going to express sonie respectful disagreement With his point of view. I would discuss in3r disagreement With the Senator from Arizima, On foreign peaky under the heading=w4hich 1 think Would be quite appropriati=-PThe Decentralization of rorejgn Policy." I do so this afternoon becauSeTWOuld not want anyone to think that in my capacity' as of the Subcommittee on American Republics Affairs of. the Coriunittee on Foreign Relations t, would remain silent when EtnyOne titthe fifipliftanCe arid the stand- ing of the 'junior Senator from Arizona expressed views on the Cuban situation so diametrically opposed to my own. On_ the . basis of his recent campaign state11141its'.,inlqe*HairiPshire, the junior Senator from AriZoila appears to be off- ering hlmaelf as' a '15-residential candidate who will lead the United States into in- ternational banditrY. That is the best that can be Said for his statement that if he were President, he would support and promote the e'fforts of Cuban ref- ugees to invade Cuba and Overthrow the Castro diotatorghip. "I would help them,' said the Se.riator, "I would train them, surifly- them' get them there." In addition, he would be "inclined" to pro- vide "air cover to any refugee invasion attempt. ? - The Senator's proposal for Cuba is ap- parently n'art of his grand design for dismantlyik, the foreign policy powers of the'dOveriiinerif of The-United States. As the fVfebabers"df this body have been privilege to heatinarlY 'times, the Sen- ator'figniArizonals deeply dedicated to the task-Of liberating' the Cuban people 41 tke caStro -Ural-MY: He believes ast7078-modirsdi-ris a grate and itime -W,Ilireart"6 The United States arid that7eVery "Ey Of its survival is a day of mortal peril for the United States. Because 'the Senator is known to held hope to accbtnplish in the decentraliza- tion of our foreign policy? There is another aspect of the Sena- tor's views on Cuba that give me some concern. That is that what he proposes is clearly illegal, a clear and direct vio- lation of our obligations under the Charter of the Organization of American States. I commend to the Senator arti- cle 15 of the OAS charter, which clearly prohibits the kind of U.S.-sponsored ref- ugee action that he advocates. Article 15 reads as follows: No state or group of states has the right to intervene, directly or indirectly, for any reason whatever, in the internal or external affair's of any other State. The foregoing principle prohibits not only armed forces but also any other form of interference or at- tempted threat against the personality of the State or against its political, economic and cultural elements. There are those who regard treaties and other instruments of law as mean- ingless pedantries, suitable areas of con- em for vague and sentimental law pro- fessors but hardly a fit basis for the hard decisions of international power politics. I, for one, believe that the United States can play fast and loose with its interna- tional legal commitments only at grave peril to its own vital interests. Interna- tional legal commitments have the same meaning for the shapers of foreign policy as contracts have for businessmen. There is nothing sentimental or particu- larly idealistic about them. They pro- vide a basis for predicting the actions of others, for being able to judge who is with you and who is against you, whom you can count on and whom you cannot' count on. As long as international legal in- struments are honored, the parties to them have in effect increased their own power because they can add to their own resources those promised to them by the international agreements. To disregard international legal obligations is to un- dermine this addition to national power, to destroy the basis for predicting the be- havior of others, and to destroy the con- fidence of other nations in our own promises and commitments. I am sure that these observations about law, as they pertain to Cuba, will be of interest to the Senator from Ari- zona. They will interest him because he is a conservative, and if there is anything that is vital to the ideology of conserva- tism it is the fundamental importance and inviolability of law. The Senator has spoken frequently and wi